Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
How to smooth a spray-painted surface?
Old 11-19-2015, 08:28 PM   #1
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
How to smooth a spray-painted surface?

I bought this inexpensive IKEA table to use in my eat-in kitchen: DOCKSTA Table - IKEA

To improve the looks of the cheap base (and to complement the all-white kitchen), I spray-painted the base with flat white enamel Rustoleum paint before assembling the table.

Now that I've been using it for a few weeks, I'm discovering that the spray-painted surface is a bit rough. Dust and hair catch on the paint and are very difficult to wipe off.

To create a smoother surface, I'm thinking that sanding the surface of the base with an ultra-fine sandpaper might be a solution, but I'm concerned about rubbing right through the thin veneer of white paint that I applied (and having it look terrible). An added concern are the contours of the base (which will add complexity if sanding).

Any suggestions on how to create a smooth surface at this stage?

omni
__________________

__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-19-2015, 08:37 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Senator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Eagan, MN
Posts: 3,039
The only way I know is to sand it. Then, if you have to apply more paint, it will look like new.
__________________

__________________
FIRE no later than 7/5/2016 at 56 (done), securing '16 401K match (done), getting '15 401K match (done), LTI Bonus (done), Perf bonus (done), maxing out 401K (done), picking up 1,000 hours to get another year of pension (done), July 1st benefits (vacation day, healthcare) (done), July 4th holiday. 0 days left. (done) OFFICIALLY RETIRED 7/5/2016!!
Senator is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2015, 09:57 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 2,946
Wet-sand it and/or topcoat with clear coat spray.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
...with no reasonable expectation for ER, I'm just here auditing the AP class.Retired 8/1/15.
jazz4cash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2015, 10:53 PM   #4
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 13,248
I would not have thought about the last suggestion, but reading it, it makes perfect sense....


The problem you have is that you used a paint that is not designed to be smooth and there is probably nothing you can do with it... covering with clear coat that is smooth will probably work... however, be prepared in that all you might do is make the rough surface look shiny.... it might not dry smooth with a rough base....
__________________
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2015, 06:33 AM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Senator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Eagan, MN
Posts: 3,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
spray-painted the base with flat white enamel Rustoleum paint
After re-reading, I see you used flat paint. It needs to be a glossy paint. Flat paint will always gather more dirt than gloss. And gloss paint can be wiped down. I am wondering why you painted a piece of furniture white, when it looks like it comes in white...

You may not need to re-sand, just get it smooth and clean. Just wipe the painted surface down, and re-paint. Maybe a scrub brush or wire brush to get it smooth and get rid of any debris on the furniture.

The original coat of flat was not a bad idea, as flat paint covers better than gloss. It does need a coat or two of gloss as a final coat.

In my first comment, I thought that a bunch of dust settled on it when the paint was wet.
__________________
FIRE no later than 7/5/2016 at 56 (done), securing '16 401K match (done), getting '15 401K match (done), LTI Bonus (done), Perf bonus (done), maxing out 401K (done), picking up 1,000 hours to get another year of pension (done), July 1st benefits (vacation day, healthcare) (done), July 4th holiday. 0 days left. (done) OFFICIALLY RETIRED 7/5/2016!!
Senator is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2015, 06:48 AM   #6
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Getting a good finish is the hardest part of any woodworking project, IMHO...

Very fine sandpaper (400?) or 00 steel wool, with a light touch, then a coat (or two or three) of gloss or clearcoat seems like a good tactic.
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2015, 07:45 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Cobra9777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,132
I just refinished an old rocker. DW wanted it painted white. I used semi-gloss Rustoleum spray paint. Put on 4 light coats, allowing it to dry 24 hours between coats. After the last coat had fully cured (2-3 days), I rubbed it down with 0000 steel wool (very fine). The surfaces are now smooth as glass and it looks great.
__________________
Retired at 52 in July 2013. On to better things...
AA: 55% stock, 15% real estate, 27% bonds, 3% cash
WR: 2.0% SI: 2 pensions, some rental income, SS later
Cobra9777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2015, 04:27 PM   #8
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
When I was building model airplanes the tactic was to wet-sand with 600 paper and spray two coats of gloss paint, sand that, and then a coat or two of clear, sanding between coats. That produces a very smooth and shiny surface.

You might get away with just steel wool and a gloss paint (depends on how fussy you are) but if you're not happy with the result then you'll have to sand anyway so I'd go that route from the start.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2015, 05:57 PM   #9
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,333
Omni - I use a 600 grit sandpaper or 0000 steel wool for sanding painted projects - between coats but never on the final coat. In your case, I'd sand and then add another coat of paint or a flat lacquer. It's tough to get a good looking finish when the final step is sanding. The sandpaper/steel wool usually dulls the painted surface unevenly. But if the surface is sanded prior to the final coat, then the final coat should end up smooth.
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2015, 10:46 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
Senator - the "factory finish" on the table base was a tiny bit off-white and had the slightest occasional surface imperfections. I thought the flat enamel would cover and hide the imperfections better than gloss. And the white color would give me a bright white finish. And it did that, but gave me a non-smooth finish.

I've never done much spray painting or other fine surface finishing work.

My takeaway, I need to use fine grit sandpaper (400-600) or 0000 steel wool, lightly. Unclear as to whether wet is better than dry. Then follow-up with --- some here say clear coat and some here say white gloss. I'm thinking I might need to do the sanding first and see where that leaves me. If I end up sanding through the white paint in spots, I'll definitely need to touch that up before I can even think of a clear coat.

Question on clear coat...Is it less susceptible to leaving a rough micro- finish than the white paint OR are they both about the same?

Thanks, all,

omni
__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 01:08 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Senator - the "factory finish" on the table base was a tiny bit off-white and had the slightest occasional surface imperfections. I thought the flat enamel would cover and hide the imperfections better than gloss. And the white color would give me a bright white finish. And it did that, but gave me a non-smooth finish.

I've never done much spray painting or other fine surface finishing work.

My takeaway, I need to use fine grit sandpaper (400-600) or 0000 steel wool, lightly. Unclear as to whether wet is better than dry. Then follow-up with --- some here say clear coat and some here say white gloss. I'm thinking I might need to do the sanding first and see where that leaves me. If I end up sanding through the white paint in spots, I'll definitely need to touch that up before I can even think of a clear coat.

Question on clear coat...Is it less susceptible to leaving a rough micro- finish than the white paint OR are they both about the same?

Thanks, all,

omni
Wet sanding helps to keep the sandpaper from clogging, I think it's easier to get an even, light sanding with the water. Some even add a drop of detergent.

One thing I've noticed with spray paint - if you are giving it the very light coats that help to avoid runs, it might actually be a little dried as it hits the surface. So instead of a liquid surface all pooling together smoothly, you might get something a little more like semi-dry grains of paint sticking together with semi-rough edges. This either needs to be sanded and/or coated with a smoother coat(as others suggested).

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 01:13 PM   #12
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Senator - the "factory finish" on the table base was a tiny bit off-white and had the slightest occasional surface imperfections.
All paint does is change color. Never expect it to hide imperfections. You have to take care of those first with filler and sanding, preferably with a sanding block. That's why surface preparation is so important.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 01:42 PM   #13
Full time employment: Posting here.
bjorn2bwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Western US
Posts: 690
Quote:
Originally Posted by omni550 View Post
Senator - the "factory finish" on the table base was a tiny bit off-white and had the slightest occasional surface imperfections. I thought the flat enamel would cover and hide the imperfections better than gloss. And the white color would give me a bright white finish. And it did that, but gave me a non-smooth finish.

I've never done much spray painting or other fine surface finishing work.

My takeaway, I need to use fine grit sandpaper (400-600) or 0000 steel wool, lightly. Unclear as to whether wet is better than dry. Then follow-up with --- some here say clear coat and some here say white gloss. I'm thinking I might need to do the sanding first and see where that leaves me. If I end up sanding through the white paint in spots, I'll definitely need to touch that up before I can even think of a clear coat.

Question on clear coat...Is it less susceptible to leaving a rough micro- finish than the white paint OR are they both about the same?

Thanks, all,

omni
In addition to what others have posted.
A quick painting primer - Spray enamel (as opposed to laquer) is thicker, slower drying and designed to self level. Among other qualities, flat finish enamel will be faster drying, giving less time to self level. If you want a smooth finish, gloss finish is a better choice.
At this point the best option is to wet sand smooth with 400/360gr wet/dry paper. Wet sanding is more efficient - the soft paint will not accumulate and clog the paper. The method - dip the w/d paper in a small container of water and sand, making sure to keep the working area wet. Wipe off the residue with a damp cloth. The finished surface should be smooth and dust-free.
To paint with spray enamel (there are special paints designed for plastic) - 1st spray a light ‘tack’ coat, then follow immediately with a full cover coat - this is tricky, you want to use enough paint to allow the self-leveling, but not so much as to cause the paint to sag (run). I think a clear-coat final finish would be overkill for this project. JMHO
__________________
How's it going to end..............
bjorn2bwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 05:20 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 2,946
Clear coat would generally be same as gloss or semi gloss paint in terms of micro finish. They make several levels of sheen now. Higher gloss equals smoother surface.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
...with no reasonable expectation for ER, I'm just here auditing the AP class.Retired 8/1/15.
jazz4cash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 06:53 PM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
Thanks for the detailed information on what to do (and why).

It'll be a few weeks before I can get back to this project due to an upcoming cruise and then hosting family visiting from Europe.

I'll report back on how the table base turns out.

Love the helpful folks on this forum. I learn so much here.

omni
__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 07:27 PM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazz4cash View Post
Clear coat would generally be same as gloss or semi gloss paint in terms of micro finish. They make several levels of sheen now. Higher gloss equals smoother surface.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum

And a slightly harder surface as well...
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 08:07 PM   #17
Full time employment: Posting here.
bjorn2bwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Western US
Posts: 690
A tip on staging for a re-spray - mounting the base horizontally, say through a piece of PVC pipe atop a couple of weighted cardboard boxes, will greatly improve the odds of a good job. And if a sag should develop, gravity is at your command.
Edit - I see the base and pedestal can separate, this advice would only apply to the pedestal if it will be painted.
__________________

__________________
How's it going to end..............
bjorn2bwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What's engine starter spray/should we get some? Amethyst Other topics 51 03-12-2011 03:46 PM
Have you ever painted a table? bank5 Other topics 10 06-13-2010 07:58 PM
painted hands: another rave Martha Other topics 12 10-10-2008 07:44 PM
How to Spray Olive Oil TromboneAl Other topics 16 03-05-2007 02:24 PM
Great deal...spray coal with tar and it qualifies for synthetic fuel credits! cute fuzzy bunny Other topics 1 03-03-2006 12:12 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:40 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.