Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-15-2010, 12:41 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha View Post
... or need to try some telemark, back country skiing.

I favor back country skiing and cross country and have equipment for both. Last year when up north I only did ungroomed backcountry on the big wide telemark skiis. I could go right out the back door.
Agreed, which is why I restricted my comment to downhill skiing. I have done a ton of backcountry skiing and ski-camping.

I lived in Europe and did a lot of downhill skiing in Austria (had to please the spouse). One part of our two-part honeymoon was cross-country skiing near Leadville, CO. My sister and BIL lived near Winter Park, CO when they retired in their early 40's, so we've had plenty of ski-from-the-door vacations.
__________________

__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-15-2010, 12:53 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 2,257
I would buy ski pants and goggles. I would rent the skis/boots.

I've skied about 10 times over the years. I could ski straight down without a problem, but I could not turn very well and fell a lot... until I took a 45 minute private lesson. After that, no more falling. Interesting that a short lesson like that could change so much! (I was evidently leaning the wrong way when I made turns.)
__________________

__________________
tmm99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Do it!
Old 12-15-2010, 01:02 PM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 126
Do it!

Skiing is a great to learn at any age. It's a "gravity sport" (you''re sliding downhill), so takes much less effort than you think. It certainly changed my life.

I started skiing at 43 (shamed by my skiier-wife who scheduled a mid-winter ski trip with her sister's family). A month before the trip, my wife took me and our two boys (7 & 12) to small ski area in W. VA for a five day weekend. The boys and I took group lessons every morning and practiced the rest of the day and discovered we loved it. By the end of the weekend we were skiing blue and easier black slopes. By season's end we were skiing the blacks and easier double blacks s at Snowbird in Utah (one of the tougher areas in the US). Within 3 years the boys were both racers (and continued through college) and I was an instructor. (My wife, in the end, never quite shared our enthusiasum).

That said:

1) Rental equipment should be fine at the begining and higher end rentals are usually available for a few dollars more, if desired (lots of good skiiers rent hi-end "demo" equipment when traveling by air).
2) A private instructor is great, but pricey. Group lessons are fine, particularly at the start. An hour or two a day of lessons should be plenty for beginners. Getting mileage (practicing on your own between lessons) is also important.
3. Most Western resorts offer half and full day group lessons, which are great once you're an advanced beginner or low intermediate (skiing in control and progressing from wedge to parallel turns or beyond)
4. Take it easy (less is usally more in skiing)
5. Be prepared to fall (I think I fell about 30 times my first day!).
6. I didn't find snowboarding any easier to learn than skiing. You fall harder at the beginning (though once you get the knack it seems to move quicker).
7) Definitely get appropriate ski clothes....good gloves, long underwear, thermals, ski bibs (or pants). googles, etc. They don't have to be expensive....but you do want to stay warm and dry!
8. Have fun!!!!

And good luck!
__________________
jerryo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 01:22 PM   #24
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,032
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha View Post

I favor back country skiing and cross country and have equipment for both. Last year when up north I only did ungroomed backcountry on the big wide telemark skiis. I could go right out the back door.
Ungroomed backcountry skiing (what I called ski touring in my previous post) is indeed fantastic. IMO, downhill skiing had become expensive, elitist and, more often than not, crowded. I favor the quiet solitude of backcountry skiing. The cross country skis I use are big, heavy, and wide, but they have a latch to lock in the heel of the shoes when going downhill (no telemark skiing for me).
__________________
FIREd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 01:39 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor View Post
Disagree. While the rentals are not the best, for a beginner there are probably the best bang for the buck. When you are a beginner you don't know what your preferences for style of skis and length are going to be. It also gives you ability to try different skis & boots.
Rentals are probably around $30 per day, used ski/bindings/boots/poles combos are running anywhere from $200 on Craigslist. (In the Spring you can get much better deals on skis of course).
One thing you might want to get is goggles, if you plan to ski while it is snowing, otherwise good sunglasses should suffice.
In the colder weather myself and the kids like to wear a balaclava (full face hat, like Seirus Combo Clava at REI.com )
Agree as well. Often (especially at the start of the season) rental equipment can be brand new.

Note that for younger kids, snowboarding is now much more popular. Us old dudes ski! I did try snowboarding, it is a totally different skill set. I was falling when I could have been skiing. And you can break wrists easily. But the boots are a lot more comfortable.

Give the skiing a try. Just be careful and don't be afraid to do a controlled fall onto your a$$ if you are unsure. Much better than flying into trees.

I've been skiing for 30 years and have never had an injury (other than a bruise or two).
__________________
Surfdaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 02:48 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
thefed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,203
Well, I talked it over with my partner, and he is 'making' me come out to his condo for the last week of Feb. We are actually taking along two of our foreman as well for a long weekend of male bonding and skiing. So I need to get to practicing!
__________________
thefed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 02:57 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,072
Have skied three times already in the Alps and will be going again this weekend - great advice above - get some lessons to learn the basic technique - it's very important to understand the body mechanics in downhill skiing. Most injuries occur because of improper body mechanics - it isn't intuitive but you need to lean down hill to get better control over the skis because your center of gravity is orthogonal to the hill and not at an angle. Also, you can learn about the different slope conditions and adjust your technique.

I love downhill skiing - although FD is right, it can get expensive and overcrowded, hence my usual skiing being done during the week if possible.

Snow boarding is a very different animal - again, body mechanics can make a huge difference.

Have a great time - learning locally is smart, also going for a week in Feb will help your skills much more quickly as well.
__________________
Deserat aka Bridget
“We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.” - George Orwell/Winston Churchill
deserat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 03:24 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ronin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,190
How does one practice male bonding, I shudder to think?
__________________
We are, as I have said, one equation short. – Keynes
ronin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 03:35 PM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
zinger1457's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,452
I learned to ski when I was a young kid by going to our local golf course (very hilly) during the winter. It was also popular place for tobogganing. No lifts, just walk up the hill and ski back down, never could get up enough speed to get hurt so the falls weren't so bad.
__________________
zinger1457 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2010, 12:06 AM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
thefed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,203
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronin View Post
How does one practice male bonding, I shudder to think?
booze and strippers?
__________________
thefed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2010, 08:30 AM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
donheff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 8,635
Fed: you might consider trying snow boarding. Most people say it is an easier learning curve than skiing. I started skiing at age 30 - the first week was pretty hard and my progression was slow. I took up snowboarding when I was about 54. After a day on my butt (look for soft snow I was up and going pretty good. The switch to snowboarding makes the small slopes available near DC fun. I have to admit, I still like skiing more and always switch back to skis after a couple of hours on the board.
__________________
Every man is, or hopes to be, an Idler. -- Samuel Johnson
donheff is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2010, 08:33 AM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
freebird5825's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: East Nowhere, 43N Latitude, NY
Posts: 9,017
Stay off any slope that has black diamonds on it until you have enough control over your skis.
__________________
"All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." - Walt Disney
freebird5825 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2010, 08:46 AM   #33
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronin View Post
How does one practice male bonding, I shudder to think?
BIL goes on an annual fishing trip for this. They don't even take the fishing equipment anymore. I have a feeling thefed won't see much of the slopes....
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2010, 10:16 AM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Htown Harry's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,516
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunningBum View Post
Strengthen your legs before going. "Wall sits" are the best. Put your back against the wall and lower to where your knees are bent 90 degrees, like you're in a chair. If you can strengthen your abs and calves, that's a bonus, but the quads get stressed the most.
+1, particularly if you are even a little out of shape.

thefed, I remember you are a DIY home improvement guy.

Remember how your body felt the day after you did a flooring job? Thighs and rear end sore from the squatting, kneeling, standing up and lowering yourself back down? Your back a little stiff from the exertion of twisting or reaching out to lift or move your tools while you are in other than a straight-up standing position?

Until you get the hang of staying vertical on your skis, you'll be repeating many of the same moves. Definitely get those upper legs toned up before your trip.

For the same reasons, arms and shoulders get more of a workout for a novice than you might expect. Your beginner lessons may be given without poles, but early in the learning cycle you will be learning to use poles to get yourself back up from the ground. Once you advance beyond basics of skiing under control, poles are also used in the motion of setting a point for a turn.

There's a specific position and motion involved in standing up with the help of your poles. You will be sitting on one side of your rear, feet together off to the side, holding both poles in the opposite hand at the handles. The poles are pointing into the snow near your rear. Reaching up a bit above your head to the pole handles, you pull down the axis of the poles, hard enough to pull your rear up off the snow. Once your rear is high enough to swing over your feet into a squatting position, you use your thigh muscles to raise up to the standing position. All in thin air with heavy clothes on.

I'm not familiar with the lingo of weight machines or the muscle groups involved to give you exercise advice. But the motion is similar to sitting down in a sidesaddle position while pulling down on a rope that you are using as an aid to raise yourself up to the standing position.
__________________
Htown Harry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2010, 11:04 AM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmm99 View Post
...I could not turn very well and fell a lot... until I took a 45 minute private lesson. After that, no more falling. Interesting that a short lesson like that could change so much! (I was evidently leaning the wrong way when I made turns.)
Having been on only one ski weekend...

I took some beginner's lessons, where mostly we were taught how to snowplow, which will wear you out in a hurry on a real slope. One of my fellow travelers gave me a quick lesson on how to turn, and by the end of the second day, I was doing reasonably well. Never quite got the hang of getting off the lifts, though. Busted my assets every time...
__________________

__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need to learn to say no...! vicente solano Other topics 19 06-01-2009 05:37 AM
Will they never learn? deepc Other topics 3 09-22-2008 09:04 AM
Want to Learn Spanish Twinkle Toes Travel Information 35 02-10-2008 06:54 PM
Hi, I am 53, and looking to learn RockOn Hi, I am... 4 01-20-2008 09:20 AM
Angel Fire NM - ski condos twolane Other topics 3 04-10-2007 04:12 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:53 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.