Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-18-2014, 03:45 PM   #21
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 32
Don't be so shy.
__________________

__________________
Nothing I say should be considered medical,psychiatric,legal,financial,electrical,or plumbing advice. I know nothing about anything.
FLD3C is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-18-2014, 03:49 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kerrville,Tx
Posts: 2,710
Quote:
Originally Posted by razztazz View Post
Knowing what I know now? Am I 18 in 1975 or 2014? That would affect the military option. Otherwise I'd go for whatever was the fastest way to a steady buck. That would likely be a trade school of some kind. Since there's no inherent necessity to earn a huge amount of money, college up-front would not be necessary.
Actually to factor the draft in make in 1972 (It was abolished in early 1973, and back then the earliest anyone was inducted was 18.5 due to processing times. By 1975 there was no draft thus its just another career choice.
__________________

__________________
meierlde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 04:00 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
steelyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Triangle
Posts: 3,218
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRG View Post

Yea so did I, minor in possession of alcohol. I was married, not living at home. Four of us got caught with a 12 pack.

DF found out about it in the local paper. Even though I was not living at home and supporting myself, he failed to see the humor.

I'd go into healthcare. Goal would be to get good education and whatever it took to get PT certification.

MRG
Mine was for marijuana and booze. We were playing a dance and the other nuts in the band left the stuff in my car. The cops were waiting and gave me a courtesy ride to the police station. But they were really nice, said "Look, you're from XXX, this is YYY" (two different towns). "We'll file this and you're on probation but chances are XXX will never hear about it."
__________________

steelyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 04:36 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,103
I think the op question tends to imply we would change either what we are or how we got to where we are. My early years were a hodge podge of education, and was married at 19 (still am and it's one of my/our greatest assets). Came from a father and his father who were engineers but I went for biology degree and then med school. After a month of med school and realizing impact on married life, dropped out and worked in a warehouse for a year. Also realized I wasn't up to witnessing a lot of pain and suffering. After reading want ads in the paper realized engineers made a lot more $$ than scientists, so got BSCE and MS (while DW supported me). First three years of consulting engineering were misery and I wondered why I ever left med school! Then hit my stride in utilities management.

So my point is I appeared to make mistakes along the way, but I would not change a thing. We all have to stub our toes, break a bone or two, maybe get arrested. In the end though, if you can look back and realize how all of this built who you are and you are reasonably happy, it was all the price to be where you are, who you are. Not to say there aren't a ton of mistakes that are pretty much irreparable (jail sentences, broken families with really bad consequences) but if you try hard you can end up with what you want.

One of lessons we taught our kids over and over was they needed a career that paid the bills but that they were going to have to do it for a long long time so choose carefully and be willing to change. Both ended up engineers (chemical). They've made some rather substantial decisions regarding careers that have made for some interesting lives. If you asked either of them the "what would you tell yourself at 18" I don't think you'd get any deep life altering suggestions.

So, while if you posed this kind of a question in my 20's I'd probably have had some pretty strong suggestions. Now at 62 I'm good with all I did. And what I didn't do!
__________________
H2ODude is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 04:39 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,564
Quote:
Originally Posted by meierlde View Post
Actually to factor the draft in make in 1972 (It was abolished in early 1973, and back then the earliest anyone was inducted was 18.5 due to processing times. By 1975 there was no draft thus its just another career choice.
Has nada to do with the draft. I meant that considering it at a time when war was highly NOT likely vs a time when it's all war all the time would be a factor.

Ultimately tho I had no real choice. At the time, as Dick Armey said, all the capitalists were trying to prove Marx was right. The home environment was shtty. The only goal in life was to jump. Job, money, drag the bag on my own. There were no "choices."
__________________
razztazz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 05:11 PM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
Jack_Pine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 834
Probably would have gotten an engineering degree. Easier to consult after retiring.

But who knows? I have a marketing degree and am now running an IT department.

BTW, They just stopped the draft in time. We had to get numbers and I drew 6.
__________________
The Constitution. It's not just a good idea...it's the law.
Jack_Pine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 05:33 PM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Buy MO...
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 05:37 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,579
Would go down same path as I am: BS Engineering; although now it seems wise to go on to MS or even PhD if you can afford to keep going. Have to be able to handle the math and science for engineering.

Alternatively, go into medical, nursing is good way to always be in demand and can live anywhere you want. Nursing jobs are everywhere. If you can do the further schooling, become an MD.

Going into military as officer is a good path. If you can get into one of the military colleges, then come out with officer rank and move up. Put in 20 years and get reasonable pension and have enough time for another career choice. Military will give lot of opportunities for leadership that can be used on outside. Plus you can get the education paid for. Current military pay for officers is close to civilian side, not as far below as used to be. One drawback is have to be willing to move around during those 20 years for change of assignments.
__________________
After Monday & Tuesday even the calendar says, W-T-F...

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/16 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 05:41 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by 38Chevy454 View Post
Would go down same path as I am: BS Engineering; although now it seems wise to go on to MS or even PhD if you can afford to keep going. Have to be able to handle the math and science for engineering.

Alternatively, go into medical, nursing is good way to always be in demand and can live anywhere you want. Nursing jobs are everywhere. If you can do the further schooling, become an MD.
I'm an MD and would rather have been an engineer. The MD lifestyle is a killer unless you are a dermatologist. 💀
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 06:03 PM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
redduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: yonder
Posts: 2,052
Simple decision: I find a field where there was a predicted shortage of skilled labor. So...

If I were 18, and knowing what I know today, (actually, I learned of this yesterday on another thread started by MasterBlaster):

Modern Problems - Clown Shortage Looms

"Oh no !

As if we don't have enough to worry about. A Looming Clown Shortage may affect us all !

As the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus returns to Brooklyn Thursday, membership at the country's largest clown organizations has plunged over the past decade."









__________________
redduck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 06:11 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsmeow View Post
If I was 18 and know what I know now, I would have majored in Psychology going on to a PhD.
Neat!!!That was my original plan, and I DID major in Abnormal Psych. The
Army, and marrying the love of my life (since age 7) put a small crimp into the original plans... no regrets...

and... as mentioned inthe OP... my grandson will go his own way, without my counsel... He's in IMSA now and will likely be able to pick and choose... (but I hope he'll include some of the humanities in his plans).....
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 06:51 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,697
I'd tell a youngster today to look into the physical therapy field. Huge growth potential from the boomers. DW needed PT last month and it was quite a scramble to find someone who had a slot.

Back in 1970, I wish I had heeded the advice of a lot of buddies to avoid "the dreaded private sector" and to jump on the MBTA, RMV or court system train. Many of them retired well before 50 with full pension and medical.
__________________
Living well is the best revenge!
Retired @ 52 in 2005
marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 07:17 PM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 65
My path was right for me then. Liberal arts undergrad in 3 years, law school, eventual MBA. But today I'd suggest an 18 year old like me take college credit classes while still in high school, go to community college and live at home to complete those first two years, go to a state school instead of a pricey private one, and double major -- with one major being either engineering or computer science and the other being whatever
I think my passion is.

I am happy my choices panned out for me. I'm not sure I'd be so lucky if starting out today.
__________________
Act2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 07:35 PM   #34
Recycles dryer sheets
Pleeplus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Mars
Posts: 135
This is actually something I have thought of in the past. For me it is less about the degree and more about the college experience. Having chosen the working path over college right out of high school I feel like I missed out on the true college experience. The lifelong friendships that are formed, the events (good and bad), stepping away from the safety of home for the first time with others that are going through the same event and growing into a young adult while bettering myself with an education.

Growing up on the east coast I would pick a school somewhere in the south to complete the unique experience and to feel like I truly stepped out of my comfort zone and into another phase of my life.

Regarding degrees, I would choose the same degrees I currently have (undergrad in IT, and masters in business) which have allowed me to be successful by walking the fine line between true business yet having the ability to communicate with the technical side.

......but again for me it is less about the degree and more about the experience of growing up in school.
__________________
Pleeplus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 07:58 PM   #35
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rustic23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lake Livingston, Tx
Posts: 3,624
I would go to the easiest college I could find with an Air Force ROTC. I would not worry about the degree, as I would plan on retiring after the AF. However, looking at the need for airline pilots currently and in the next five to ten years, I would try to fly. At any rate become an Air Force Officer and do pretty much the same thin I did.

If you check the trends on this board. Retired military officers do quite well in the early retirement since. Will it be that way in the future. Who Knows! But it has been that way for at least the last fifty years.
__________________
If it is after 5:00 when I post I reserve the right to disavow anything I posted.
Rustic23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 08:59 PM   #36
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 39
It depends on the kid. If he is motivated and ready for college, then send him. If he's not sure, then have him work or volunteer for the year, maybe through in some travel to 3rd world. As a Manager, I found many smart graduates that thought that after college, they should be promoted to CEO after they had been working for a year, so getting the understanding the call it work for a reason, and that manual labor can get old fast is something that might help keep him motivated for college.
Tom
__________________
Using Tapatalk
Socal Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 09:40 PM   #37
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Cocoa Beach
Posts: 406
I wouldn't change a thing.
Not that everything has been perfect throughout my last 29 years (age 18 to 47) but if I went back and changed something then I wouldn't be who I am now, and I kinda like me and my life as it is.
If I followed a different path then I wouldn't have ended up in the USAF after a failed attempt at college, wouldn't have learned the discipline that I needed or the technical trade that led me overseas, wouldn't have married my wife in 2012 and wouldn't be on our current path of ER in 2017 at age 50.
No, I wouldn't change a thing....life is good!
__________________
Lucantes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 09:43 PM   #38
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,137
At 18, three weeks after graduating from high school, I left home with $20 in my pocket and the clothes I was wearing on my back to join the Navy. At the time, it was the one and only chance a poor kid had of getting away from a sleepy little Midwestern town. Looking back, I have occasionally thought about how I might have done things differently, and I have always concluded that I would do the same thing again. The Navy was good for me; it made me grow up and gave me the idea that, with hard work and smart decisions, I might just make something of myself. I particularly appreciated the idea that I didn't need to guess what it would take to be successful in that environment. They said "do this, and the better you do it, the more successful you will be." I took to that like a duck to water. I feel sorry sometimes for kids today, who must grapple with what the world demands, and figure out for themselves how to be successful.

The Navy gave me a college education, a challenging job, and a skill that I then put to good use when I left to return to civilian life. The discipline that I learned in the service later helped me complete law school and then helped me prepare for early retirement. I will be forever grateful for the opportunity that they gave a young, dumb kid long ago.

So, for my money, if you're 18, you can't go far wrong serving our country.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 10:31 PM   #39
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Silicon Valley
Posts: 198
I am an Electrical Engineer, with an MBA much later. This has been very enjoyable and interesting, with a huge amount of variety. However, with lots multi-year part-time and breaks for kids... it has not been an outrageous career success.

I would tell my 18 year old self to suck up the extra workload and add computer science degree (I could have had the extra degree with one extra year and a bunch more work), and this would have weighted me to programming projects and management.

Instead now in partial retirement, I will learn to program for fun... at least that is the plan.
__________________
SVHoper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 11:02 PM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
photoguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,301
Go into firefighting.
__________________

__________________
photoguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Are You Better Off Now Than You Were Four Years Ago? tapper FIRE Related Public Policy 14 09-08-2012 03:14 PM
Eyesight =( How old were you when..... Aiming_4_55 Other topics 45 12-15-2011 05:58 PM
How old were you when your retired early? roscaroo Life after FIRE 77 07-25-2006 11:42 PM
Are you better of than you were 4 years ago? GTM FIRE and Money 8 01-08-2005 07:30 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:16 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.