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Job Opportunity... Go or Stay?
Old 01-13-2012, 06:52 PM   #1
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Job Opportunity... Go or Stay?

Current job: No stress, pays enough money, stable, good hours, good co-workers/boss, acceptable commute. Negatives are no growth and no learning. My boss personally told me I won't go anywhere unless he leaves.

Other Opprotunity: Little stress, 20% more money, stable, good hours, good co-workers/boss, very good chance of going up to executive level in 2 yrs, lots of learning, better commute, growing company. Negative is half the size of my current company.

I'm having a hard time deciding because my current job is sweet. Don't need to make more money so very comfortable here. But then, I'm only 32 so have many more years to work so I don't want to settle now... but why would I want that executive level that comes with stress when I'm happy now...

What do you think? Go for the new opportunity or stay here?
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:10 PM   #2
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How well do you know the other firm's corporate culture? I don't think the relative size of the companies should be the deciding factor, substitute execution and market potential.
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:15 PM   #3
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So the differences are:

Pros:
20% more money
better commute
more opportunity for advancement
better learning experience
growing company, but smaller

Cons:
A little more stress (but not much)


Sounds like you know what you want to do, but are hesitating to make the leap.
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:16 PM   #4
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"Better the devil you know" is one aspect worthy of some serious consideration.

OTOH, at age 32 I didn't think I ever wanted to climb the corporate ladder. As opportunities began to open to me that changed. Down the road will you regret not setting yourself up for advancement? Only you can answer that question.
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:21 PM   #5
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I'd make the change. 32 is pretty young to be facing years of no growth. And the move up to exec level at the new place is only hypothetical, and you could potentially say no if it looks like the stress would be too much.

I don't see a problem with moving to a smaller place -- especially if you have the possibility of stretching yourself a bit and doing more interesting work. And that 20% raise is not insignificant when you add it up over time (and figure you will get additional raises/promotions that greatly increase your compensation, while at the old place you will be pretty much treading water).

The better commute would seal it for me, personally. My commute is the one thing I truly hate about my job.
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:45 PM   #6
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You don't seem to mention which you would enjoy more, not a factor? Would be to me, though I'll concede at 32 you have to give a high priority to reaching for FI. I was fortunate to find something challenging and enjoyable that also paid well, I was lucky.
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Old 01-13-2012, 09:30 PM   #7
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At 32, I'd definitely go for the new challenge for the growth opportunities alone. Add in shorter commute AND a 20% raise? It's a no brain-er. If it doesn't work out, you're starting the next interview from a higher salary level and more experience.
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Old 01-14-2012, 12:00 AM   #8
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You need to realize that it is a job and not a family. Most companies will dump you the moment you stop being an asset. Take the job that does the most for you, then do the most you can for them. If job one isn't doing the most, and it sounds like they aren't financially, and you aren't doing the most for them, locked in a dead end job, you really need to move.

When I was 27 I journeyed out as a telecom tech. I was working with 50+ year old telecom techs and thinking; wow! I've 'peaked' at 27 and that man over there, old enough to be my dad, is where I will be for the next 25 or 30 years. Made me feel like it was going to be a waste, knowing I wouldn't grow.

Take the better paying job and definitely take the better challenging job. You will enjoy both!!
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Old 01-14-2012, 05:40 AM   #9
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Quote:
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When I was 27 I journeyed out as a telecom tech. I was working with 50+ year old telecom techs and thinking; wow! I've 'peaked' at 27 and that man over there, old enough to be my dad, is where I will be for the next 25 or 30 years. Made me feel like it was going to be a waste, knowing I wouldn't grow.
I had an experience like that, only in high school, pumping gas at a gas station back when gas stations did that for you (OK, I'm dating myself here). That's an OK job for a high school kid for beer and gas money, but I was also working next to a couple of 50-year-olds doing essentially the same job.

That scared me and was a strong incentive to go to college.
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Old 01-14-2012, 05:43 AM   #10
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No learning is a warning flag. At age 32 that means you might be obsolete in your 40's and then what will you do? In a labor market facing global competition learning is what will give you value, and a future.
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Old 01-14-2012, 06:11 AM   #11
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Based only upon the information you provided in your post, I would go.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HatePayingTaxes View Post
What do you think? Go for the new opportunity or stay here?
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Old 01-14-2012, 07:50 AM   #12
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I'm with the change voters. If you were in your late 40s and planning to ER in 5 years no, but at 32 with probably decades of work ahead, yes. This isn't just a short phase you are moving through it is your life.
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Old 01-14-2012, 07:59 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I had an experience like that, only in high school, pumping gas at a gas station back when gas stations did that for you (OK, I'm dating myself here). That's an OK job for a high school kid for beer and gas money, but I was also working next to a couple of 50-year-olds doing essentially the same job.

That scared me and was a strong incentive to go to college.
Off thread, but ditto. A life defining experience for me was a summer job after a freshman year of college that I had a great time but only got average grades. I was working sweating my a$$ off making minimum wage next to some guys that were a few years older than me and making only a bit more. After that experience I decided that college was a golden opportunity to solidify my future and I was more dedicated to my studies, regularly made Dean's list, and came within a whisker of graduating with honors due to the average grades in the first year.
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Old 01-14-2012, 08:12 AM   #14
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I agree with the others to go for the other job. You are much too young to be stuck in a job with no growth potential. IMHO, one should always be looking to better themselves, at least until toward the end of their career. Better salary, better commute, no brainer.
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Old 01-14-2012, 10:31 AM   #15
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I was going to echo REWahoo's first sentiment, but better commute would probably clinch it for me.

Do you already know the boss and co-workers at the new job?
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Old 01-15-2012, 07:47 AM   #16
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One thing HatePayingTaxes didn't mention is whether years vested with his/her current company matters financially (to 401K or ESOP, etc). Not mentioning it probably means it doesn't... but it should be considered; as should the "retirement/benefit" packages for each position.

At 32 I was early into my career and, like the OP, I shied away from management positions; choosing, instead to be a respected in my particular area of expertise. That didn't necessarily shield me from j*b stress but, if given the choice, I'll always prefer "Product Stress" to "People Stress"... if that makes sense. Fortunately, I was able to explore different areas within the same company and, while my salary/prestige didn't increase greatly, I was able to build equity in VERY generous 401K and ESOP progras. This equity played a large role in helping me FIRE @ 48.

Conversely, I watched coworkers jump ship... hopping from job to job without gaining a foothold in any retirement program. Worse still, not being vested, they would throw money away with each change. Now, they are looking around, trying to figure out what to do.

Bottom line... "retirement/benefit" packages are a double edged sword... they grab hold of you, holding you with a company/position that you may not find emotionally or professionally rewarding but they can also be your ticket to early freedom.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:17 AM   #17
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Seems it's unanimous I should go. I think I already knew it but have a hard time letting go of my current gig.

I know about the new job boss/co-workers only through the interview. Of course, nothing's certain but I have a pretty good feel from multiple interviews and the fact that their retention rate is very high.

No retirement package from my current company.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:22 AM   #18
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Retention is a key indicator of workplace culture.
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Old 01-16-2012, 02:28 PM   #19
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From totally non-scientific discussions with friends over the past few years, in general the culture at smaller companies seems to be good/improving while at larger companies it's not-so-good and declining. If I was still w*rking, I'd mostly likely have left Megacorp for something (much) smaller by now.

Total generality, YMMV.
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Old 01-16-2012, 02:51 PM   #20
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I would take the new job. You have to keep your skills up to date these days.
I was recently let go from a position where there was no growth/no training, but I am 60 and was ready to retire, so began my retirement the next day.

I would have been in trouble if I had to look for another job.
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