Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-07-2012, 08:48 PM   #21
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan View Post
My Dad was still eating dripping sandwiches and dripping on toast in his 80's. (In between his fags cigarettes of course).
'
I can't count the times I heard Mum ask Dad "give us a fag, luv."
__________________

__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-07-2012, 08:51 PM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,456
We have LOTS OF LARD in The Valley. Mexicans/Latinos are crazy about pork in all its forms. I've gotten used to the flavor of lard in pinto beans, so I go down to the local Mexican grocery to get me some of that fresh rendered roasted lard for my beans. They dont taste right without it. None of that purified white stuff - you've got to have that roasted pork flavor. The groceries sell little pig skin squares for beans, pig cracklings in every form. I keep discovering new pork products LOL!

At our favorite carnitas place (carnitas are Mexican-style chunks of roasted pork shoulder) they put some caramelized roasted pig fat from right under the skin called cueritos on the platter too. It's kind of soft and gelatinous. We've developed a liking for it!

I guess the Spaniards were (are) just as crazy about their pork. We had some mighty fine Jamon Serrano and some lovely Spanish cured chorizo over the holidays.

Crisco - the partially hydrogenated vegetable fat kind - is full of trans-fats and thus much less heart healthy than the original lard it replaced. I suppose they've reformulated it by now? I only use butter in my baking, but lard would probably be healthier than butter for pie crusts.

Audrey
__________________

__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:03 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Major Tom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SF East Bay
Posts: 3,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumby View Post
Odd you should mention that. She always called it "drippings on toast"
That's it! I'd forgotten what we called it, but still remember the taste.

Oh where did we go wrong........
__________________
ER, for all intents and purposes. Part-time income <5% of annual expenditure.
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:06 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Naples
Posts: 2,161
All this talk about lard and bacon drippings sure brings back the memories. Best cooking in the world was done with bacon grease. I remember having breakfast with Dad in the mornings, this was in the 40's, and Mom always fixed him fried eggs in bacon grease. We didn't always have meat but he got his eggs and toast,

Mom also made a tossed salad and the dressing was fried up little pieces of bacon and the drippings. She called it wilted lettuce. Anyone ever hear of this type salad?
__________________
JOHNNIE36 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:11 PM   #25
Full time employment: Posting here.
JakeBrake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Southeast USA
Posts: 548
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
We have LOTS OF LARD in The Valley. Mexicans/Latinos are crazy about pork in all its forms. I've gotten used to the flavor of lard in pinto beans, so I go down to the local Mexican grocery to get me some of that fresh rendered roasted lard for my beans. They dont taste right without it. None of that purified white stuff - you've got to have that roasted pork flavor. The groceries sell little pig skin squares for beans, pig cracklings in every form. I keep discovering new pork products LOL!

At our favorite carnitas place (carnitas are Mexican-style chunks of roasted pork shoulder) they put some caramelized roasted pig fat from right under the skin called cueritos on the platter too. It's kind of soft and gelatinous. We've developed a liking for it!

I guess the Spaniards were (are) just as crazy about their pork. We had some mighty fine Jamon Serrano and some lovely Spanish cured chorizo over the holidays.

Crisco - the partially hydrogenated vegetable fat kind - is full of trans-fats and thus much less heart healthy than the original lard it replaced. I suppose they've reformulated it by now? I only use butter in my baking, but lard would probably be healthier than butter for pie crusts.

Audrey
I was watching the local farm show on public TV this evening. They said Southeast USA farmers are exporting lots of pork to Mexico (over a billion $ worth this year) and the average Mexican eats 5 times as much pork as the average American.

However, I think I'm above average.
__________________
JakeBrake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:14 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Major Tom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SF East Bay
Posts: 3,128
This thread really ties in with the long-standing preoccupation many of our forum members have with bacon doesn't it?
__________________
ER, for all intents and purposes. Part-time income <5% of annual expenditure.
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:20 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Major Tom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SF East Bay
Posts: 3,128
You guys have me jones-ing for some drippings on toast right now, darn it.
__________________
ER, for all intents and purposes. Part-time income <5% of annual expenditure.
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:37 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Goonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North-Central Illinois
Posts: 3,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNNIE36
....I remember having breakfast with Dad in the mornings, this was in the 40's, and Mom always fixed him fried eggs in bacon grease....

Mom also made a tossed salad and the dressing was fried up little pieces of bacon and the drippings. She called it wilted lettuce. Anyone ever hear of this type salad?
Mom and I both HAVE to fry up a mess of bacon first, so we have the bacon grease to fry the eggs in!!! We just can't stand eggs fried any other way!

As for the bacon drippings over salads, we like it over fresh spinach instead of lettuce. There are a couple of 'up-scale' restaurants around here that serve the wilted spinach salads that way. They think it's something new! Haha!
__________________
Goonie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:38 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
bbbamI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dallas 'burb
Posts: 9,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNNIE36 View Post
Mom also made a tossed salad and the dressing was fried up little pieces of bacon and the drippings. She called it wilted lettuce. Anyone ever hear of this type salad?
Absolutely.

My momma would make that with all different types of greens.
__________________
There's no need to complicate, our time is short..
bbbamI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 10:13 PM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,261
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNNIE36 View Post
Mom also made a tossed salad and the dressing was fried up little pieces of bacon and the drippings. She called it wilted lettuce. Anyone ever hear of this type salad?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goonie View Post
...

As for the bacon drippings over salads, we like it over fresh spinach instead of lettuce. There are a couple of 'up-scale' restaurants around here that serve the wilted spinach salads that way. They think it's something new! Haha!
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbbamI View Post
Absolutely.

My momma would make that with all different types of greens.
DW started making that some years ago. Spinach, the bacon, hard boiled eggs, and some almonds or walnuts or pecans - probably a few other bits in there I don't recall. Delicious and very 'upscale' with the right things in it. IIRC, there was some vinegar in there, which gave a nice bite with the bacon. Hmmmmm!

Some of the great family/friends cooks I knew (that are gone now) would insist upon lard for some things. I think I read recently that there are all different grades of lard, and getting the right kind for the cooking you are doing is tough (if you can find it at all).

audreyh1's post has inspired me, I'll check out the local Mexican mercados around me - lots of interesting stuff there (I love dried hibiscus - makes great tea, soda, vinaigrette and even a sauce for pork).

Some recipes for the Hibiscus:

http://patismexicantable.com/cgi-bin...mit=20&x=0&y=0



-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 10:45 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nodak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Cavalier
Posts: 2,317
My grandmother would collect the pan drippings and usually in the fall of the year make lye soap for doing laundry.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent." Pogo Possum (Walt Kelly)
Nodak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 11:30 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,835
I grew up in the Uk in the 1960s and lard was the cooking fat of choice....we'd never heard of olive oil. We had a "chip pan" for frying and you'd put it on the heat and wait for the white lard to melt.

Lard was also used in all pie crusts. I use lard quite often as it's easily available in the supermarket. The harder thing to find is beef suet, but if I ask the butcher at Wholefoods I can usually get some to make suet pastry or really tasty dumplings.
__________________
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

Current AA: 65% Equity Funds / 20% Bonds / 7% Stable Value /3% Cash / 5% TIAA Traditional
Retired Mar 2014 at age 52, target WR: 0.0%,
Income from pension and rent
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 11:57 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
veremchuka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: irradiated - too close to the nuclear furnace
Posts: 1,294
The best pie crust is made with lard not vegetable shortening, so the great pie crust people have told me.
__________________
veremchuka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 05:52 AM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeBrake View Post
I was watching the local farm show on public TV this evening. They said Southeast USA farmers are exporting lots of pork to Mexico (over a billion $ worth this year) and the average Mexican eats 5 times as much pork as the average American.

However, I think I'm above average.
I'm not surprised! But when I visit my dad in GA, I notice that in the southeast people are pretty crazy about pork too! Gee, you never saw so many forms of ham or salt pork. I guess their greens wouldn't be right without it.

And then there's their BBQ. Folks from GA and NC think Texans are crazy for using beef in their BBQ. It's sacrilegious! They consider pork the anointed one.....
__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 06:16 AM   #35
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
We have LOTS OF LARD in The Valley. Mexicans/Latinos are crazy about pork in all its forms. I've gotten used to the flavor of lard in pinto beans, so I go down to the local Mexican grocery to get me some of that fresh rendered roasted lard for my beans. They dont taste right without it. None of that purified white stuff - you've got to have that roasted pork flavor. The groceries sell little pig skin squares for beans, pig cracklings in every form. I keep discovering new pork products LOL!

At our favorite carnitas place (carnitas are Mexican-style chunks of roasted pork shoulder) they put some caramelized roasted pig fat from right under the skin called cueritos on the platter too. It's kind of soft and gelatinous. We've developed a liking for it!

I guess the Spaniards were (are) just as crazy about their pork. We had some mighty fine Jamon Serrano and some lovely Spanish cured chorizo over the holidays.

Crisco - the partially hydrogenated vegetable fat kind - is full of trans-fats and thus much less heart healthy than the original lard it replaced. I suppose they've reformulated it by now? I only use butter in my baking, but lard would probably be healthier than butter for pie crusts.

Audrey
And there is chicharron. Deep fried pork skin. When they use lard there is nothing tastier. Mexican food is so good.

My favorite sweet, from childhood, is cherry pie. For many years now, however, I haven't eaten any because it just doesn't taste the same. The difference, of course, is my mother used lard to make the dough, and that gave it a deliciously flakey quality that is, for me, mandatory.
__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 07:34 AM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,456
Yes, Michael, my reference to "pig cracklings in every form" was an attempt to include chicharrones. I have never seen such massive quantities of chicharrones as you see here in The Valley. And on a breakfast menu you'll see dishes like "Chicharrones en Salsa Verde". I haven't tried that one yet. Sometimes I find them floating in my bowl of pinto beans served at a restaurant. Bowls of pinto beans "frijoles charros" are ubiquitous here in The Valley, served as a starter or side to most meals. And they always have interesting bits of pork in them.
__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 07:54 AM   #37
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
Yes, Michael, my reference to "pig cracklings in every form" was an attempt to include chicharrones. I have never seen such massive quantities of chicharrones as you see here in The Valley. And on a breakfast menu you'll see dishes like "Chicharrones en Salsa Verde". I haven't tried that one yet. Sometimes I find them floating in my bowl of pinto beans served at a restaurant. Bowls of pinto beans "frijoles charros" are ubiquitous here in The Valley, served as a starter or side to most meals. And they always have interesting bits of pork in them.
Pig cracklings. Not familiar with the term, but it appears I should be. Salsa verde wouldn't be my first choice, as we have always eaten them crispy, but I'm sure I'd get to it - when you like all the ingredients separately, you gotta try them together.

You mentioned spanish food in your previous post. My favorite sausages are chistorras, which have little kick from paprika, and morcillas - blood sausage. I could live in Mexico or Spain with no problem...
__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 08:40 AM   #38
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 746
We always have lard on hand - can't make good flour tortillas without it. And we do like our flour tortillas.
__________________
East Texas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 09:19 AM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,380
I never thought I would see a thread on lard on this board, but it just goes to show. Here's a funny tidbit about someone's interactions with Armour, a major commercial lard producer. How Much is Inside Success story: Lard

In places where people have way more money than sense it has become trendy to buy "artisanal lard" at $15+/#, from a couple of holdover hippies at modern farmer's markets in expensive neighborhoods.

Was I ever surprised when a few years ago I visited my first urban Farmers' Market. When I was a boy I sometimes tended my grandparent's farm roadside stand. Tomatoes, "15 cents/#, 2 # for 25 cents." This was both better and cheaper than in the grocery store. That is not the way with today's farmers' market. Perhaps better, perhaps not, but a long way from cheaper. But of course it is 'artisanal".

Sir, I would like a dozen eggs and a large dose of fantasy, please.

Ha
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 02:08 PM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Major Tom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SF East Bay
Posts: 3,128
Inspired by this thread, I started what has turned into a long thread on my Facebook account about drippings on toast. It's been wonderful to see friends and relatives contribute their memories of the use of beef and pork dripping, including a beautifully written description (by my sis-in-law) of the way that beef drippings were served on toast with salt and pepper to the kids when they returned home from school. It's just one of the memories she has of growing up in Birmingham in the 50's and 60's.

I need to stop now before I start getting hungry again.
__________________

__________________
ER, for all intents and purposes. Part-time income <5% of annual expenditure.
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:54 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.