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Old 06-06-2014, 12:17 PM   #21
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* Hah!, OK, so poking around (finally), it looks like they are in "/usr/bin"? Double-clicking those program names does indeed start them up. So the Launcher dialog assumes this path as default? That's part of my confusion I guess, w/o that path name explicitly called out, there was a little 'black-box-magic' to me. That is a system-wide path, if I wanted an app only available to a specific user, can I just move that file to their home folder? Or is there a bunch of support stuff that has to move as well?

I knew I'd learn a thing or two by starting this thread!

-ERD50
/usr/bin is where "programs" are by default. BTW, other commonly used terms are binaries ("bin" in /usr/bin), executables, (hence, *.exe files), wrappers (scripts which end up invoking other excutables, binaries), etc.. One can create their own "bin" directories and set the search path to include the directory. I used to have binaries which I created and put them in a personal "bin" directory. These days, I don't need to create any program to suit my need, thanks to "open" world we are living in.
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Old 06-07-2014, 11:51 AM   #22
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In modern distributions commands for users live in /bin or /usr/bin. Commands for system admin live in /sbin or /usr/sbin. Libraries live in /lib or /usr/lib. Since everything in Unix from day 1 was a file, you find /dev with devices such as disks etc, (/dev/sdax for a disk for example). /proc contains a lot of information about what is happening on the system at this time.
The unix file system is a tree starting from the root (/).
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Old 06-08-2014, 11:56 AM   #23
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* Hah!, OK, so poking around (finally), it looks like they are in "/usr/bin"? Double-clicking those program names does indeed start them up. So the Launcher dialog assumes this path as default? That's part of my confusion I guess, w/o that path name explicitly called out, there was a little 'black-box-magic' to me. That is a system-wide path, if I wanted an app only available to a specific user, can I just move that file to their home folder? Or is there a bunch of support stuff that has to move as well?

I knew I'd learn a thing or two by starting this thread!

-ERD50
OK, I understand. Others pointed out /usr/bin , /bin . Unix has an organized file tree that is fairly standard between unix versions.

Here's a link to a description, General overview of the Linux file system

/bin - system binaries
/usr/bin - user programs

each user has a startup file in their home directory. Usually .rc ( the "." is a hidden file) but maybe different depending on what shell you are using. The config file sets a lot of environment variables for your user session, like your default search path. Also this what starts X when you login instead of a terminal. Use the "env" command to see the settings for your variables.

symbolic links are used a lot to create short cuts to programs and directories.
windows 7 started supporting links but I don't see much use of it. alias is similar to link.

Sometimes a program is started as link via a different name. The program will operate differently depending on the name it was started from.

Virtual terminals is a cool feature ( similar to virtual desktops ). ALT+Fn will give you another console to start new session on.
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Old 06-08-2014, 12:18 PM   #24
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I use linux (ubuntu) for my mythtv based DVR and love its stability. It has, however, broken a couple of times over the past 5 years that its been up - usually during a big upgrade. I find the audio subsystem to be overly complex for a home system, but the flexibility cannot be beat.

The best part is the user community. Every time I run into an issue, I can find the answer online.

I would use it on my notebook if it supported PSE, Lightroom and Quicken.
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Old 06-08-2014, 12:29 PM   #25
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That is a system-wide path, if I wanted an app only available to a specific user, can I just move that file to their home folder? Or is there a bunch of support stuff that has to move as well?

I knew I'd learn a thing or two by starting this thread!

-ERD50
Typically you can move it . Or you can customize the permissions on the file, like create a new group that owns the file and put the users you want in that group.

Here's a link to using permissions in linux Learning the shell - Lesson 7: Permissions
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Old 06-08-2014, 12:40 PM   #26
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I started with linux in 92 when Torvalds posted the 0.10a kernel on compuserve. It was a little rough back then, it just booted to blinking cursor. You had to edit the kernel with a hex editor and change some bits to tell where the boot device was located. To get a system, each piece had to be downloaded individually and most was in source code and had to be compiled before use. The kernel, C compiler and a few other basic tools were maintained by individuals and distributed as binaries, then a system could be built from those. There was an earlier system called minix that sort of was the inspiration for linux.

Slackware was one of the first all in one "distros" ( it was a branch/cleanup of SLS linux ), Redhat came along, Toms Root Boot (tomsrtbt) was a tiny distro that fit on two floppies. Lot's of other came and went. I built my own system for many years ( roll your own ), there was users group for DIY linux projects. The XFree86 project ported the windowing system over around 95 or so. One of the nice things with linux is the GUI is not integrated into kernel and you can use whatever GUI you choose ( there are many )

So I have been with linux since it's inception. I guess the one drawback is lack of software products people are used to like Quicken, but there are many opensource projects to replace most apps.
I remember you talking about it at work. A couple of lifetimes ago.
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Old 06-08-2014, 02:56 PM   #27
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I remember you talking about it at work. A couple of lifetimes ago.
hmmm.... Yea I guess it has been that long ago. I guess that explains all the gray hair now ( that or j*b induced stress !)
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Old 06-08-2014, 03:23 PM   #28
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My story is fairly recent,
I bought a pogoplug a couple of years ago. The built in firmware wasn't able to somewhat I wanted. ( act a a local file server). So it went in a box with my other useless electronic stuff. Then I stumbled across a site that told me how to install archlinux on it. So I installed it and samba, and slowly added more stuff, like pyTivo, and plex and it started getting loaded down with things, until I finally converted an old wintel box to a full arch install. It's mainly a server, but I gave a desktop system installed and I use it for a few things.
Tom
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Old 06-08-2014, 08:17 PM   #29
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Three pages of responses and counting for a thread on Linux. A pretty good illustration of the demographics that make up this community. :-)

I started using Linux in 2000 when I got my first programming job at a soon to fail dotcom. I fell in love with it, at least for building software.

I've done a lot with it. But once Mac OS X, also Unix based, came out, I made the switch because of all the great consumer apps available, such as MS Office, iMovie, etc.

With Mac you get Unix and great apps, so not sure I would switch back.
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Old 06-08-2014, 08:34 PM   #30
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Had to learn Linux for a work project about a year ago. I really liked it and when I had to get a new laptop, I looked on a website to check linux compatibility, then purchased a laptop, cleared Windows (yes, no duel boot), and installed linux mint. I absolutely love it and doubt I will use Windows again. It took me a good 3 months to get the hang of things and had to use the command prompt quite a bit to fix some compatibility problems and for software installations. I installed windows on top in virtualbox.
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Old 06-08-2014, 08:48 PM   #31
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Back in 1993 I was a sysadmin on Convex,SGI,Sun and RS6000 machines. When the first linux came out I bought a pc to play with it, but was intirigued with how much easier development was with visual basic and C at the time. Changed jobs to the IT department, but kept playing with Linux at home, until I retired in 2004. Lost track for a while and came back recently (after a machine became a spare). It was interesting how far things had come. all be it the old skills came back on use of the command line after a bit of web surfing. It is amazing how far Linux has come (suse 13.1). Did not play with it from 2004 to 2014 for various reasons, but then discovered both dosbox to let me run win3.1 stuff (I had a lot of the old cds with shareware around), and then moved back to Linux and virutal box as well.
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