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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 12:33 AM   #41
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
I served in the Coast Guard on the North Pacific coast.
For those who don't know, HaHa is talking about mighty rough seas. Listen to the man. The United States Coast Guard trains off that coast, just beyond the mouth of the Columbia River. When the weather is bad (often enough), it is some of the roughest sailing to be found anywhere. I have always marvelled that Balboa named that ocean "the pacific", 'cause it ain't particularly peaceful.

I think in terms of what we denizens of the Pacific Left Coast call 'gunk-holing'--cruising around the San Juans and Puget Sound, hanging out and drinking green tea while the seagulls are stealing your french fries off your plate on the fantail of your cruiser. This is a good life. Just do not go out beyond the bar.

The US is extremely fortunate to have protected water in many high-traffic, desirable areas. Learn about it.

Charter, charter, charter!!! Try it out first. Learn the ropes.







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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 09:25 AM   #42
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaHa
I've been on Coast Guard bartenders
Either I've missed an entire class of important military vessels, or that has to be one of the most impressive Freudian slips I've ever seen.

Is that another name for a buoy tender?
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 10:24 AM   #43
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Re: living on a boat

LOL

I've occasionally been found on a few bartenders myself...
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 10:57 AM   #44
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Re: living on a boat

The boating experience of those posting on this thread is impressive, and their comments accurate.

I think the writer intended to say 'bar tender', as that ship that hangs around the mouth of a river caring for the navigation markers... like the Columbia River bar where we lost a pilot overboard this winter. Husband has water skied the mouth of the Columbia, but on most days it is rough and on some days downright dangerous.

A woodie is a very fixable boat, there are at least two great shipwrights in the Portland area. One fellow is re-building an old woodie tug.. that boat is HUGE. In the Seattle area there are a couple wood boat groups, and a yard (I think) in Port Townsend that specializes in woodies.

A friend of the 'kids' who sails out of FL said that there are few old wood boats in his area because of worms so I didn't think that construction would be wise for warm waters in the SE. Evidently the worms aren't in all of them.

All seas have heavy weather from time to time, commercial ships loose cargo and/or sink more frequently than most know. I agree with other writers, there should be at least two on board who can operate the boat. It is wise to charter a boat first to see if you really enjoy it. I know of charters out of Bellingham and in the Caribbean. ALL require evidence that you can safely operate the boat (they dive the hull when you return).
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 11:40 AM   #45
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Re: living on a boat

Brat,

There is a Society for Wooden Boats in Seattle, right on Lake Union:
http://www.cwb.org/BoatFest2005.htm
It is a cool place. (What a town!)
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 05:59 PM   #46
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords
Either I've missed an entire class of important military vessels, or that has to be one of the most impressive Freudian slips I've ever seen.*

Is that another name for a buoy tender?
I'm hoping if I was on a human bartender, she was at least female. What I was actually referring to is the old design of motor life boat, a 36 footer which had a stern shape almost identical to the bow, a design sometimes referred to as bartender. They were self bailing rescue boats with excellent strength and dynamic stability. and designed, as Brat said, to handle breaking surf at the Columbia River bar as well as other heavy breaking sea conditions. The poster who mentioned imagining one's boat in a waterfall, being dropped etc, put me in mind of those days. Truthfully, some of it scared the **** out of me, but also gave me a rush the likes of which I probably will never experience again.

Damn, you guys can be strict!

Ha
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 06:11 PM   #47
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaHa
I'm hoping if I was on a human bartender, she was at least female. What I was actually referring to is the old design of motor life boat, a 36 footer which had a stern shape almost identical to the bow, a design sometimes referred to as bartender. They were self bailing rescue boats with excellent strength and dynamic stability. and designed, as Brat said, to handle breaking surf at the Columbia River bar as well as other heavy breaking sea conditions. The poster who mentioned imagining one's boat in a waterfall, being dropped etc, put me in mind of those days. Truthfully, some of it scared the **** out of me, but also gave me a rush the likes of which I probably will never experience again.
HaHa, picture being on the bridge of a tanker the size of an aircraft carrier with sea comming over the bridge wings... all crew members not required to be on duty are in their bunks tucked against the cabin wall by their survival suits.* Every time my kid has it up to his eyeballs with the boatyard he looks at a picture of that ship..

When conditions are that rough the likes of the folks on this board need to be in a sheltered cove.*
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 06:34 PM   #48
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaHa
a stern shape almost identical to the bow, a design sometimes referred to as bartender.
www.bartenderboats.com

"deep in the sea are riches beyond compare. but if you seek safety, it is on the shore"~~saadi, rose garden
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 07:24 PM   #49
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Re: living on a boat

Follow the link. There's Bellingham, again!
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-19-2006, 09:34 PM   #50
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaHa
Damn, you guys can be strict!
And insanely curious.

I stand corrected, and I learned something new!

I was on this board for several months before I realized that "Dory" wasn't referring to the fish.
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 09:45 AM   #51
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy
Follow the link.* There's Bellingham, again!
Wow - right in my backyard, and I never knew! How interesting.
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 10:36 AM   #52
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaHa
Damn, you guys can be strict!
You think thats bad? Now I have this mental picture of a self-baling female bartender with a stern the same shape as her bow.

Not a good thing at all.
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 11:26 AM   #53
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Re: living on a boat

If you are ready to move now I found this posting on CraigsList (in Seattle a listing is up for only 7 days)

Date: 2006-03-20, 12:51AM PST

Catalina 27’
$8,200 o.b.o.

This is a great boat. In the four and a half years I have owned it has served as a great voyaging and live-a-board vessel. The owners before the ones I bought it from sailed it from Seattle to Mexico and back. Some of the outfitting they did to it included: re-enforced bow, thicker stays and hinged windows. I purchased it in 2001, lived aboard on Bainbridge Island for eight months and then went out sailing with my fiancée. We spent a month aboard, going as far north as Desolation Sound in Canada and then left the boat to live in Alaska. Once we moved back to Seattle we took up residence again on the boat and have been living aboard for the last two years.
With all the storage and space it has in the cabin this has not been as hard a feat as you might imagine. We even had a cat here with us up until recently. The boat comes with a small refrigerator that fits it perfectly. There is a stove (and heater) that’s kerosene powered. The main heat is electric, much like the kind you’d find in a house that does a great job heating the place and regulating the temperature. That heater, along with four power outlets were installed by my fiancé’s father who has his only electrical contracting firm and has been working as an electrician for thirty years. When not on the dock the cabin and running lights and other amenities are powered by a marine grade battery.
The power for the boat is a 7.5 hp Honda long-shaft. During our long days of windless sailing this outboard kept us going at around 5 to 8 knots. After sitting so long with out being used the carburetor got corroded and I had it taken in to be rebuilt. With a few pulls it works great now.
Some of the other features of the boat are:

-VHF radio
-Auto helm
-Five jibs (one is a storm jib and one is a Genoa), all in good condition
-A Spinnaker, in great condition with a spinnaker pole attached to the mast
-A 22lb Danforth and a 25lb claw anchor
-A marine head with Y valve (currently uninstalled)
-8 foot fiberglass dinghy

This boat is ready for you to do just about anything you might want to do in a sailboat. It is currently moored in Ballard at Ballard Mill Marina. The slip, which is okayed for livaboarding is a great one on a small dock with nearby bathrooms, showers and a laundry room. The marina is cozy and secure with more of a neighborhood feel than Shilshole has. Come down and see it, it’s gotta go in the next few weeks!
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 09:33 PM   #54
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
I was on this board for several months before I realized that "Dory" wasn't referring to the fish.
Man! The underwater Navy really IS different from the surface Navy!

Brat,

At $8,200, I bet it is gone already.

Cheers,

Gypsy
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 09:36 PM   #55
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy
Man! The underwater Navy really IS different from the surface Navy!
Ed, you wouldn't by any chance be suggesting they are "sub-humans" would you? Didn't think so...

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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 09:58 PM   #56
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Re: living on a boat

Ow! OW OW OW OW OW!

Really submarined this thread.
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-20-2006, 09:58 PM   #57
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Re: living on a boat

No, but I have heard tales that they are hygene-challenged. :
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-21-2006, 10:34 AM   #58
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Re: living on a boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy
Man! The underwater Navy really IS different from the surface Navy!
It's like eternal enemies from different universes.

Congress wants us all to be joint but we submariners & blackshoes can't even get along with each other on the same Navy deployment, let alone with different services. About the only thing that would cause those two Navy communities to work together would be an even stronger antipathy toward the Air Force. Your tax dollars at work...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy
No, but I have heard tales that they are hygene-challenged. :
Shipboard cleanliness (the equipment, not the people!) & sanitation (both equipment & people) are extremely important when the alternatives are firefighting, damage control, & food poisoning. No one skimps on those and lives to talk about it.

However hygiene is considered less important than having an adequate supply of water for the reactor/steam plant and being able to do proper maintenance on the evaporator. The submarine washer/dryer were only placed in service if we were under way for more than two weeks. It's all about priorities!

The submarine force goal was (maybe still is?) to use less than 22 gallons per day per person of potable water. This includes cooking and laundry as well as drinking or even showering/shaving. (Steam-supplied evaporators are gradually being replaced by reverse-osmosis systems, so this goal may be outdated.) Toilets are flushed by salt water so were not part of the total. If you regularly stayed below 20 gpd/person you were either a cheating liar or a hard-charging goal-oriented taskmaster with early signs of flag-officer potential. (And your crew had a 2% re-enlistment rate.)

Cooks and flag officers were allowed to shower anytime they wanted. Of course some other submarine sociopaths embraced the relaxed hygiene standards a little more enthusiastically than others, but a salt-water washdown and a couple babywipes go a long way.

My personal favorite was being on station and spending six-hour watches close-dancing with leaky periscopes (1-minute breaks every hour whether you needed it or not, unless a contact was within 10,000 yards). Between the salt-water trickles and the hydraulic-fluid drips it was either wear a rain hat (to the crew's perpetual amusement) or just shave your head.
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-21-2006, 11:46 AM   #59
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Re: living on a boat

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Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy

At $8,200, I bet it is gone already.* *
IMHO, unless this boat is a sinker, the new owner could invest $20,000+ in hull and engine work and still have a great deal.

I hope the purchaser checks with the marina on the live-aboard slip.* Marinas really want to vet their tennants, rent is market rate
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Re: living on a boat
Old 03-22-2006, 09:08 AM   #60
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Re: living on a boat

Hi guys!

Question for Dory-

My husband and I looked into buying property in Freeport, Grand Bahama Island as a winter getaway/second home. We were told that island people frequently went over to the mainland (Ft. Lauderdale area, I think) to get groceries, supplies, etc. I (thought I) understood that it was a relatively quick trip - less than an hour or so by boat each way.

SO, the question is - where are you going from/going to in the Bahamas that will take (can't find original post but believe you said) 15 - 20 hours trip over??
Just curious - we still may end up buying a small condo in Freeport someday.

Also, just think you all need to note that (if I got this correctly) the OP, Claire is living in Great Brittain and will be traveling in the Mediterranian - kinda far to do anything stateside for her.

Question for Claire - what about all those riverboats/barges throughout Europe - that would seem easier and a really cool way to go - have you thought about this? I've always wanted to take a cruise on one of those things!

Have a great day!!

Jane

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