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Old 03-15-2012, 06:51 AM   #41
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Look on the bright side: you could have been born in 1924.
Speaking from personal experience?
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:11 AM   #42
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I think we may be looking at a shortage of highly skilled labor, but not labor in general. Maybe this will reduce the age discrimination that many have faced in their 50's and 60's.

My friend who works for a community college tells me the math classes are full of HS grads and people in their early 20's. As he tells it they are now going to school at night and paying anywhere from $150-$600 to learn the math they could have learned for nothing while they were in Jr and Sr High School.

As a teacher, I sadly see many students who blow-off a good education, paid for by taxpayers, and provided by hard working teachers. I guess the students want to join the night school crowd in later life.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:16 AM   #43
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My friend who works for a community college tells me the math classes are full of HS grads and people in their early 20's. As he tells it they are now going to school at night and paying anywhere from $150-$600 to learn the math they could have learned for nothing while they were in Jr and Sr High School.

As a teacher, I sadly see many students who blow-off a good education, paid for by taxpayers, and provided by hard working teachers. I guess the students want to join the night school crowd in later life.
If they are really committed they could probably do better with the Khan Academy on YouTube. Even Bill Gates kids use Khan.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:31 AM   #44
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Speaking from personal experience?
Sure. I knew a lot of guys who served in WWII.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:54 PM   #45
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My friend who works for a community college tells me the math classes are full of HS grads and people in their early 20's. As he tells it they are now going to school at night and paying anywhere from $150-$600 to learn the math they could have learned for nothing while they were in Jr and Sr High School.
The other side of the perspective (experienced by my daughter) is a commentary on the relative skills of high-school math teachers vs college teachers. Which ones are more highly trained & compensated?

Our daughter got her math skills from Kumon...
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:22 PM   #46
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Which are better trained? And why is that so?
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:36 AM   #47
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I think we may be looking at a shortage of highly skilled labor, but not labor in general. Maybe this will reduce the age discrimination that many have faced in their 50's and 60's.

My friend who works for a community college tells me the math classes are full of HS grads and people in their early 20's. As he tells it they are now going to school at night and paying anywhere from $150-$600 to learn the math they could have learned for nothing while they were in Jr and Sr High School.

As a teacher, I sadly see many students who blow-off a good education, paid for by taxpayers, and provided by hard working teachers. I guess the students want to join the night school crowd in later life.
Agreed here.

It takes some kids a long time to get motivated.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:48 AM   #48
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When there is a worker shortage it's because employers always "want it my way". They want employees that are trained and ready to go the first day. Very little incentive to train for the long haul when you can hire and fire or up the visa quotas. Well that's business I guess. It never was pretty.
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:00 AM   #49
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The other component of "want it my way" is wages. Over the last few years, I have seen at least ten news stories about welder shortages. If the pay was better, there would be plenty. Makes good fodder for the newsies, though.
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:26 AM   #50
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Yeah, the something is students watching the marketplace and picking a major "where the jobs are". For the last several years, everyone was told that the way to a secure job was to be a nurse. The market convinces more students to enter nursing (indeed, nursing schools turned away an unprecedented number of applicants in the last few years) and all those new nurses are graduating faster than the number of position is growing. And now all these folks with newly minted degrees are wondering where all those jobs are that were "promised" when they were a senior in high school.

The same thing happened to tech jobs and EE/CS majors in the 1980s. Silicon Valley was booming so rapidly they couldn't hire new EE/CS grads fast enough. But once many of these jobs started going offshore, students picking majors started going elsewhere. And now we're starting to hear we don't have enough software engineers with CS degrees and relevant experience again...
When I picked my major in college, it was because I thought it sounded interesting. I was warned by many people, old and young, that I was going into a dying industry. It turned out I liked what I studied so I kept with it and what I studied paid well. I am fortunate in that regard. When I graduated in 2005, I walked with less than 20 kids, half of which were on what I called "vacations," or fully subsidized education in America through national oil companies like Saudi Aramco. The demographics of the other 7 college programs (at the time) across the country were similar. So, roughly 140 students total, about 1/2 to 2/3 which didn't have to return back to the mother land to fulfill their obligations for having their education paid. Some like the Kuwaitis and the one from Myanmar were allowed to keep their Jaguar and work where ever they please.

2 years later, my school alone (of which there were only about 2000 students when I attended, including graduate students), was graduating for my major close to what the entire nation, including international students, did when I walked. Unfortunate for these students, the bottom dropped out. The schools continue to pump them out, but it is slowing down. Someone like me, with little experience (almost 7 years), is in high demand. I'm right in the "lower" paid position where I can automate a fair bit without bothering people or needing to fly all over the place to get "training." Someone straight out of school, they have a hard time finding a job.

The cycle continues....
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Old 03-16-2012, 12:00 PM   #51
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I imagine there must be some problems in the labor market due to qualified people wanting to change jobs but unable to do so because they hold underwater mortgages.
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Old 03-16-2012, 02:41 PM   #52
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I imagine there must be some problems in the labor market due to qualified people wanting to change jobs but unable to do so because they hold underwater mortgages.
And in other cases, the fear that they will not get needed medical coverage for pre-existing conditions.
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Old 03-17-2012, 02:39 PM   #53
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The other component of "want it my way" is wages. Over the last few years, I have seen at least ten news stories about welder shortages. If the pay was better, there would be plenty. Makes good fodder for the newsies, though.
I believe business people are greedy. If they have an unfilled demand for their product and could produce more product if they had more skilled employees, they'd pay higher wages, and attract the needed employees, as long as the incremental profit covered all the costs of the higher wages. They like making more money.

They aren't bidding wages up now because they don't see how the profits generated by the additional labor they'd attract would be covered by the incremental profits produced.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:31 AM   #54
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I believe business people are greedy. If they have an unfilled demand for their product and could produce more product if they had more skilled employees, they'd pay higher wages, and attract the needed employees, as long as the incremental profit covered all the costs of the higher wages. They like making more money.

They aren't bidding wages up now because they don't see how the profits generated by the additional labor they'd attract would be covered by the incremental profits produced.
Just out of curiousity, what line of work were you in before you retired?
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