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Old 05-09-2012, 12:15 PM   #21
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Don't know I would call any of our experiences 'mid life crisis'...just a need for a change. We ain't gonna live forever.....
Speaking of a need for a change....here's an oldie.....


Ever feel the need for a change...
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:32 PM   #22
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Don't know I would call any of our experiences 'mid life crisis'...just a need for a change. We ain't gonna live forever.....

....DH bought his red sports car in his mid forties. At 54 he bought a motorcycle, retired the next year and let his hair grow long. He still has the bike, but got his hair cut...it drove him crazy.

At 41, I stopped pushing a pencil, (quit my job) and at 42 became a volunteer cop. At 50, I bought my own sports car and starting sketching again.
bbbamI! Love your art - good for you!

In my 40's I cleaned up my life - education-wise. I went back to school, and finished my master's degree - the one that I let go of when I was in my twenties. The man left, but so did my degree!

I still believe in following my dreams. My work has to mesh with my soul in order for me to feel like I'm really in the "Zen" of life's stream.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:34 PM   #23
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Not sure if this qualifies or not but...when I was 28 (31)now I began to think about and look for a job in law enforcement. I quit my job in IT at 29 and went into law enforcement. Been very happy ever since. I think that my current contentment comes from having a job I love and my son being born 17 months ago, and having another on the way. Everything really came together at the same time. Interesting fact: my son was born at 1:00 am on the morning of the day I was to start my new law enforcement job, so I missed my first 2 days of work... They were very understanding.lol...
I really think that it wasn't a mid/quarter life crisis because most of my dissatisfaction with life centered around a job that I hated. I had worked in the same it job for 8 years and hated it for about 5 of those...made the change and came immediately out of my funk.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:39 PM   #24
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Mine was backwards. We've always LBYMd, but we had fancy cars (got the Corvette out of my system at age 25), clothes etc. in my 20's. At 30 I went on a health kick, running marathons, century (bike) rides, Outward Bound. By 40 I'd become more frugal and I wasn't exercising at all. At 50 we were even more frugal and I got into exercising, eating healthy again. I've always been up for new challenges, and if anything more so now - you only live once. Ocean (sail) racing, skydiving, bungee jumping - might as well while I'm still able. Still pretty much in that phase, who knows what will come next.

Fortunately job burnout didn't hit me until I was about 55, reaching FI probably helped induce that.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:40 PM   #25
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Had a mid-life crisis 11 years ago at age 45 that resulted in this:



I still have the car, but luckily the crisis soon ended.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:00 PM   #26
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I was 37 when I got the Miata. I suppose that could've been a mid-life crisis, but I felt it was a reward for hitting a financial goal and being able to splurge on something I'd wanted for awhile. I still have it and enjoy it 13 years later, so it wasn't just a fling.

At 39 I ran my first marathon, something I'd always wanted to do, butI felt like it was more a matter of being surrounded by supportive people in a new city, and a bit of wanting to do it before I got too old. I'm still doing them, so again, not just a fling.

FIRE'd at 49, I suppose that could also be called a mid-life crisis, though most here recognize that's not a crisis situation.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:11 PM   #27
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I had mine when I was 35. I walked around for a couple years joking I was almost middle aged. Apparently, I believed it and had major depression and anxiety, most related to my health. I was terrified I was dying. Every little physical sensation was cancer, a stroke or a heart attack. I spent a night in bed, writhing in pain and now I understand it was a severe anxiety attack. It took several years to really get over it.

No sports car, motorcycle, etc. Maybe that's coming, but I consider that my mid-life crisis. I've come to terms with my health. It's generally good and I'm probably going to die someday. I don't want to die soon, but I'm OK with it now. Life is short and spending all my time worrying about it is stupid.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:32 PM   #28
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If a mid-life crisis arises with the sudden realization of one's own mortality, then mine happened in my 30s and led to my early retirement.

Until then, I blindly followed the rules. Work hard in school so I could get into the best college, work hard in college/graduate school so I could get a good job, don't drink, don't smoke, don't party too much, don't do drugs, find the right girl, get married, buy a house... The job turned out to be a disappointment and I started regretting studying so much and not enjoying life enough. So early-retirement has been my way to rebel against conventions and regain control of my life.
Up to the disappointment part I could've written this.

In my very early 30s-ahead of the curve!-I was working a stressful job, and had a new child. Got a call from the Doc telling me I had about a year to live. Fortunately, he followed that up with "unless you have heart catheterization." Had three plus a pacemaker before the problem was (hopefully) permanently alleviated.

Caused a lot of introspection! Result:

1. Learned about E-R, and set-up finances to try to accomplish it in my 50s. This was a by-product of my health scare-I feared what would happen to my young family if I became incapacitated or worse.

2. Changed jobs over the course of the next few years. Found something less stressful.

3. Spend more time w/family. Had another kid. Work half time, and try to be Mr Mom the other half.

4. Started volunteering for Boy Scouts and homeless shelter. Always knew I wanted my work to make a difference for others, but confirmed this.

5. Decided to have more fun with hobbies. Took up beer brewing and bbqing/smoking (As I say, I make all the manly foods.). Always loved music, but have no musical talent 'cept listening. Hand built a killer system: tube amp, pre-amp, phono amp and speakers. Bought/inherited several pieces of antique furniture. Restored them.

6. Personality changed. Formerly very easy going. Became an uptight asshole. Eventually found the middle ground between the two. MUCH less willing to put up with BS, much more likely to tell people what I think than before. This is ocassionally problematic .

Just turned 40 this year. Not currently expecting another midlife crisis. I'm hoping the early 30s shocker innoculated me. Plan to add another hobby. Fix up the '76 Monte Carlo! As I like to say, while I can't be restored it can.

I should give mention to a VERY patient and understanding wife that put up with me through all this.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:37 PM   #29
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How many of you went through a major change as you reached 40 plus? How did it manifest?
Oh, it was terrible. I was. Infused, irritable, and generally grumpy.

Then I got the Miata... ;-)
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:38 PM   #30
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Sixty now and still enjoying my midlife crisis, guitars, motorcycles, martinis, fast cars and slow women, life is great. Special thanks to Fender, Yamaha, Ford, Phizer and the makers of Tangruay

Seriously folks, life is short, enjoy your family, friends and don't take yourself too seriously as in the end we all end up as worm food.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:45 PM   #31
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Oh, it was terrible. I was. Infused, irritable, and generally grumpy.

Then I got the Miata... ;-)
What were you infused with?
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:48 PM   #32
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I had my mid life crisis early . It was in my thirties . I suddenly felt like I had missed out on a lot by marrying young . I got divorced , bought a sports car and spent a few years catching up with what I perceived I missed . It was a rough spot that luckily ended well .
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:04 PM   #33
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At 39 I bought a corvette convertible.

At 40 I bought my Harley (DH already had one)

At 42 I was at a Harley rally and had a serious accident on the bike. I didn't have a helmet on and to this day don't know how I came out with only a broken arm.

Bike was totaled, introspection ensued. DH sold his bike within six months, and the corvette was sold shortly after that.

If that accident hadn't happened I'm not sure we'd have the money we have today and be close to FIRE. It took thinking I was going to die (as I was flying over the bike in the accident) to get a grip on our priorities and our spending...thankfully DH was ready for a lifestyle change as well.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:06 PM   #34
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slow women
So you are dating the residents of the local group home?
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:13 PM   #35
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So you are dating the residents of the local group home?
Yes, especially the ones with walkers and low self esteem.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:22 PM   #36
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Yes, especially the ones with walkers and low self esteem.
Oof, I feel another episode of granny porn is lurking in this somewhere...
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:52 PM   #37
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I retired.

But, yes, Brewer, In my 40s I became very jealous of my priorities. That is, we streamlined our lives to make sure our personal priorities took top billing and made the required changes.
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:11 PM   #38
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I never had a mid-life crisis, I didn't get married until my early 30's...........oh the stories I could tell...........
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:20 PM   #39
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I never had a mid-life crisis, I didn't get married until my early 30's...........oh the stories I could tell...........
When you are wild and crazy and "sow your wild oates" early in life maybe you don't need to have a mid life crisis. I got to have some of those "stories I could tell" moments too in my 20s and 30's. Frankly the thought of a mid life crisis (Im 47) just sounds too exhausting for me now. I enjoy peace, calm, and enjoyable routines now.
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:31 PM   #40
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I wouldn't call it a crisis, but I went through an "interesting" period. When the stress built up to an intolerable level, I retired from my first career (military) at 43. Coincidentally, I got married for the first time three days later. Started my second career (technical writer/software project mgr) a few months after that. What a busy year!

As it happened, all went well. Still very happily married 23 years later, and retired from the second career nearly 11 years ago.

If I had that period to do over again, I'd make no changes.

Interestingly, I have a couple of friends who went through fairly typical midlife crises, one with a Miata and the other with a Jeep Wrangler. Both coped well.

IMHO, the best possible type of MLC is what I think I see among many of the denizens of this board. Namely, the decision to take better care of yourself. Lose that spare tire, build some muscle mass, get some regular exercise.
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