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Old 12-05-2014, 06:47 PM   #41
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Um, whose fault is it? Maybe look in the mirror? If people want to stop doing this over-accumulating, they should just stop doing it. It doesn't take an act of Congress not to live in a too-big house with too much junk cluttering it up.
Its conditioning from all the mind numbing commercials Americans have been exposed to from childhood.
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Old 12-05-2014, 06:57 PM   #42
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Its conditioning from all the mind numbing commercials Americans have been exposed to from childhood.
That's a big part of it. Just today I heard part of a radio commentary that Amazon now is working on a way to advertise its wares. While one is in the bathroom.

Great. Is there no shelter from the onslaught of advertising?
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:39 PM   #43
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Its conditioning from all the mind numbing commercials Americans have been exposed to from childhood.
I enjoy the Internet and forums like this as it gives me alternative ideas on how to live. Advertising is everywhere, but I had to really seek out cool ideas on how to simplify our lives and do more LBYMs.
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:54 PM   #44
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The cars are waterproof so no need to have them taking up valuable space for the motorcycles, bicycles, golf clubs, camping gear, recycle bin, etc, etc.
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Old 12-05-2014, 09:36 PM   #45
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I grew up here, from 1936 til marriage in 1958. The house is 787sq. ft. Dad and mom rented the house for $7wk... 3BR, 1BA, living room. dining room, kitchen and pantry. No hot water until 1943... carried kettle from stove to 2nd floor BA on Saturday night. No phone until 1950.
One and a half miles to school... no school busses then. We walked back and forth, and came home for lunch, as there were no school lunches or cafeterias then. So 6 miles a day of exercise...Lunch break.. 20 minutes walk, 20 minutes for lunch at home, and 20 minutes walk back.
My bedroom was 2nd floor left, and my brother's on the right. Both dad and mom worked in textile mills... she a weaver, he a loomfixer who worked the night shift. 10PM to 7 AM. The textile industry was up and down, even in the war years, so layoffs were common when orders were slow. In the busy times, dad worked 60 to 70 hours a week... layoffs were usually a few weeks, and I can remember some hard times (though it didn't seem that way to me), when we had potato peel soup.

I never felt poor, though I usually had holes in the soles... with cardboard inserts that melted when it rained... Biggest disaster was the winter when my buckle galoshes leaked.

Worst memory... I was the last kid in the school to wear knickers... It was war years and the elastic that was supposed to tighten below the knee, was artificial rubber, and it just hanged... hung?... so I pretended to myself that the knickers were pants and wore the beltline low. Finally mom bought me some regular pants at the Army-Navy store... A milestone!

That, and the fact that I inherited a violin from my 18 year old uncle who was killed when his B24 crashed over Poland in 1943. ( he was the tail gunner, and couldn't get out, though the rest of the crew parachuted to safety).... sooo I had to take violin classes. My friends played trumpet, and drums. Ya just had to be there... (was allowed to quit after two years, and had reached the 6th position).

Times were different. Learned to love horse meat fried in butter... lard when rationing coupons ran out.

Best thing... we had a car... none of my closest friends' families had a car. It was a 38 Oldsmobile and rusted out... After the war, dad and I painted the car with the then "new" latex paint... a miracle invention. It was called "powder puff" painting... We used big cloth "puffs to apply the paint.

Enough... If we had had the money then, we could have bought the house for about $7000. It sold in 2006 for $240,000, and the current Zillow price is $137,000.

Ummm...so what was the subject? Doesn't take much to set off memories.

Where is this house? I seem to recall you grew up in RI, and I think there were some textile mills around Cranston, or thereabouts.
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Old 12-05-2014, 09:44 PM   #46
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Folks, remember the economists telling us: "It's a Consumer Driven Economy".

If you aren't buying lot's of stuff that you may or may not need , you are not doing your part to keep the economy rolling.

(only halfway sarcastic )
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:11 PM   #47
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Where is this house? I seem to recall you grew up in RI, and I think there were some textile mills around Cranston, or thereabouts.
We lived in Pawtucket. There were dozens of mills all through NE... DW's dad owned a warping factory in E. Providence.
The history of the New England Textile Industry is absolutely fascinating. My entire extended family (both sides) was employed in one fashion or another. Grandma was a Cluett, of Cluett & Peabody,,, manufacturer of Arrow Shirts Pic #1
My folks worked mostly at Lorraine Mills Pic #2
and we lived about a mile from
Sayles Bleacheries Pic #3

Cranston had several mills including Cranston Print Works, which lasted until 2009.
http://www.wbur.org/2009/05/28/factory-shutdown
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File Type: png Screen Shot 2012-02-05 at 5.30.45 PM-thumb-479x311-786.png (266.2 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg Lorraine Mills.jpg (69.2 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg Sayles Bleacheries..jpg (239.1 KB, 16 views)
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:25 PM   #48
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Speaking of old textile mills.....When I was Engineering Manager at a large, old brass mill in Ansonia, Connecticut in the mid-1970's, we had a 1000 KW operating hydro electric plant that provided some power to the powerhouse that was built on the plant site in 1911. The hydro wheel and generator were shot and I found a "sister" hydro at a shut down textile mill in Baltic Mills, CT. We pulled it out and used the parts off it to rebuilt ours. (Nothing like rebuilding a decades old hydro electric plant with no new parts available.)

That old textile mill was shut down in the 1950's or so and still had the overhead belt drives on the looming machinery on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Actually, most of the physical plant utilities and wood floors were still intact. The plant was owned by some bank in NY, and at the time,wanted us to buy the whole place, but we declined.
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:32 PM   #49
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Just a wee bit more on the mills... The Sayles Bleachery not only bleached fabric, but also dyed it. The distance between the Bleachery and Lorraine mills was about 2 1/2 miles. The little stream shown in the Lorraine drawing, was the Rosebud Canal and in the early days served as a barge route between the two mills... carrying fabric back and forth. There was a trail along the canal, used by mules that towed the barges in the 1800's, then replaced by a shortline railway in the early 1900s. The canal also served to carry the "used " water from the bleachery to the blackstone river and then out to sea in Providence. The water changed color every day, depending on the dye being used. It was on the way walking to my Jr. High School and we would bet on the color of the water before we got to the bridge over the canal.
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:42 PM   #50
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Speaking of old textile mills.....When I was Engineering Manager at a large, old brass mill in Ansonia, Connecticut in the mid-1970's, we had a 1000 KW operating hydro electric plant that provided some power to the powerhouse that was built on the plant site in 1911. The hydro wheel and generator were shot and I found a "sister" hydro at a shut down textile mill in Baltic Mills, CT. We pulled it out and used the parts off it to rebuilt ours. (Nothing like rebuilding a decades old hydro electric plant with no new parts available.)

That old textile mill was shut down in the 1950's or so and still had the overhead belt drives on the looming machinery on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Actually, most of the physical plant utilities and wood floors were still intact. The plant was owned by some bank in NY, and at the time,wanted us to buy the whole place, but we declined.
Wow!... My stepfather was a mechanical engineer for several different mills in the 1920's through the 1950's. He would tell me stories of the horizontal hydro turbines that powered many of the mills... not electric, but belt/mechanical power. The long forgotten canal system that went throughout RI. Mass, and Ct. was a combination of power, transportation and travel. Strange that there is very little written history of this very significant part of the industrialization of America.
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Old 12-06-2014, 09:11 AM   #51
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Wow!... My stepfather was a mechanical engineer for several different mills in the 1920's through the 1950's. He would tell me stories of the horizontal hydro turbines that powered many of the mills... not electric, but belt/mechanical power. The long forgotten canal system that went throughout RI. Mass, and Ct. was a combination of power, transportation and travel. Strange that there is very little written history of this very significant part of the industrialization of America.
We pulled the drive wheel and the bucket assembly out of the bottom of the plant and the canal ran right through it! It was full of trees (no water in it) and we had to cut down several to get to the turbine house entry. What a fun project for a 30 year old engineer.

Some kids burned the old mill down in 1999 (see link). In that story, about the 5th picture going left to right is the empty penstock (they called it the crankshaft) is in the area where we took out the turbine wheel.

http://jpgmag.com/stories/18868
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Old 12-06-2014, 11:07 AM   #52
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Aja8888, thank you very interesting. How many people and how many days do you recall this taking?

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Old 12-06-2014, 12:26 PM   #53
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Aja8888, thank you very interesting. How many people and how many days do you recall this taking?

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Boy, it was a long time ago, but..used a contractor to get access and pull out the wheel and long shaft (2 days).

Transported to my plant and probably took a week to close the dam, pull our hydro apart, remove wheel and shaft, put in the one from the old mill, rebuild our generator (while it was out), assemble the hydro and start it up.

People wise, probably 6 on each task and a crane and forklift. We needed the wheel and shaft because our shaft had worn down at the poured lead/copper bearings and was repaired several times. The paddle wheel buckets were welded so many times, they just needed all new steel. If I remember correctly, finding that old shaft and wheel gave us the opportunity to fix it up without rushing and rebuild our generator at the same time.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:36 PM   #54
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I smell an oxymoron in here somewhere...
Agreed to disagree whether I/you like it or not.
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Old 12-08-2014, 08:38 AM   #55
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That is the best hidden trailer hitch I've ever seen.
It buys us back two feet of garage, which leaves enough room to continue to access our rear garage side door. Great feature.
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Old 12-08-2014, 03:59 PM   #56
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Thanks Aja8888,
Fascinating what people make work when there's no other way. I'd seen water powered sawmills, but with a waterwheel not a turbine. None of what we saw was functioning. We looked at all the old broken mills we could, just in case you needed parts.

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