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My Dog has a torn ACL
Old 09-01-2008, 07:34 PM   #1
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My Dog has a torn ACL

My 20 lb+ dog has a torn ACL.
I have read about the procedures.TPLO is out since it has been implicated in bone cancer.
I have read about a TTA surgey that is done with a Titanium plate.
My thoughts are to go with the safer conventional surgery and then have him do hydro therapy for rehab.
Has anyones dog had surgery for this problem and what are their thoughts.
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Old 09-01-2008, 07:38 PM   #2
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We've consulted with the orthopedic vet for our 10 yr old 35 lb dog, but have yet to determine the best course of action. Since the recovery time is 12 weeks from the surgery, we decided to wait until it is cooler to have something done. He is stable and not in a great deal of pain at this time.

We are leaning towards something that has been described as fishing line replacing the ligaments across the knee (it is a rear leg). There is also a mechanical implant that was described to us, but our regular vet is steering us to the other (less expensive) option.
Good luck to you--please keep us posted on the surgery and outcome.
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Old 09-01-2008, 07:44 PM   #3
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Yes,it is the fishing line,we are thinking of.I have read that the longer you wait,the more arthritis sets in.
I am reading all I can,it gets mind boggling.
Our Poodle is 7yrs old but doesn't know it.
Good Luck.
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Old 09-01-2008, 07:51 PM   #4
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Not only can arthritis set in, but the other leg can be damaged due to the compensating for the injured leg. So much to worry about! And 7 is young, especially for a poodle! (what size poodle?)
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Old 09-01-2008, 07:57 PM   #5
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if you are in south florida might i recommend The Hollywood Animal Hospital - Hollywood, FL

i used a local vet for annual shots and such but i would only use the dee's for anything serious. they performed tplo on both wolfpuppy's hind legs, both completely successful, extending wolfpuppy's life into his old age. (at the time, dr dee was the only vet in florida licensed for the procedure and they had vets from japan there to observe the operation on wolfpuppy.)

it is a family biz, currently run by the second generation of sibling vets. you will find their office to be run nothing less than professionally.
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Old 09-01-2008, 08:42 PM   #6
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Thanks for the responses.I am happy the TPLO was succesfull but our Mini Poodle is only 21lbs.I have to confess its lnk to osteosarcoma scares me and also the cutting of bone.

I think we will go with the conventional treatment.
Btw/why is your Vet advising you to go with the fishline procedure? My Vet was just pushing this one Vet in Tampa but I was wondering why,since my Vet didn't seem to have any knowledge of the ACl procedures.
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Old 09-01-2008, 08:43 PM   #7
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btw/I am opposed to annual vaccinations.I use Titers on my dogs.
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Old 09-02-2008, 08:43 AM   #8
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I think my vet was aware of the cost differential on the two procedures, honestly, and felt that the outcome from the "fishing line" (sure wish I could remember the more technical term) would be reasonable in light of our dog's age and lifestyle (he's a certified nap-hound). Our vets (a husband and wife) are friends.
We have four dogs, five cats, some sheep and fish, plus we usually have a foster Border Collie or two around the house, so the cost has to be a consideration, unfortunately. If we were talking about one of the younger BCs, I think we'd consider the higher-end surgery a little more, if only because they are more active.
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Old 09-02-2008, 10:21 AM   #9
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Lucky you to have so many Pets.
Bordie Collies I have read are very intelleigent.My little guy is a smart dog too.
I have two dogs,my injured dog,is a non stop guy,my little girl is a nap dog too.

We go for a consult on Friday,hopefully we will find out more.
Thanks again.
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Old 09-02-2008, 10:34 AM   #10
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Our pointer/dalmation mix has had both rear acl's go. In the first case it was a partial tear and the crappy vet we had at the time recommended waiting for it to go entirely. It did finally go while we were in the middle of moving. We had the 'fishing line' surgery done because the new vet we went to recommended it since it was inexpensive, moderately effective, and didnt rule out doing the other surgeries in the future. When he operated he found that having waited a long time created extensive arthritis. Had we had the surgery done sooner rather than waiting for a full tear, it would have been nominal.

The extra load from having her favor the leg caused the other leg to go just a little over a year later. We had the bone surgery with a titanium plate done on that one. Minimal arthritis in the joint. The 2.5 month recovery was a good workout for me as I got to carry a 70lb dog up and down 3 flights of stairs the whole time.

About 5 months after the surgery she developed a couple of infections on the leg, which to me looked like they came from inside rather than something external like a bite or puncture. The vet disagreed, thinking it was a foxtail that went in at one site and came out the other. He operated extensively on the leg, found nothing, cleaned out the wound and closed it up. About 3 days after the antibiotic course was done, the sores opened up again.

We went back to the orthopedic surgeon, who suggested it may be a problem with the plate and he removed it. Once she recovered from the 3rd leg surgery in six months she's been fine.

I'm not sure how a titanium plate with stainless steel screws can cause an infection unless there was something wrong with the plate or how it was put in, but everyone said it was 'just one of those things that happens'.

She's now on a daily dose of doggie vioxx to combat the arthritis. We had a lot of trouble with the meds, going through 3 different ones. They all make her puke, although Deramaxx seems to cause her the least trouble. Unfortunately Deramaxx is about $600 a year.

My MIL had the same surgery on her chihuahua's rear leg. Took the same amount of time to recover. Didnt hear about any problems with the plate after that.
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Old 09-02-2008, 12:05 PM   #11
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It is so good to have responses,I keep clicking on when I can.

I am thinking more and more to go with the conventional surgery.
I suppose the best thing,is the Vet and his expertise.
I am sorry your dog suffers from the arthritis,what a thing to tell someone to wait until the leg worsens,he should have his license taken away.
My dog has had his tear 3 weeks this coming Friday,when the Vet will do surgey(I think) after he evaulates his Xrays,B/W and whatever other tests are necessary.
All my best to your dog.
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Old 09-02-2008, 12:14 PM   #12
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Yeah he was a new vet who had just taken over our retired vets practice. We only went to him the one time.

Who does the surgery is critical. This is one of those things with a long steep learning curve. I talked to a lot of vets and specialists and the same two orthopedic surgeons names kept coming up. For anyone in the Sacramento or Yuba City CA areas who wants to know their names, PM me.

She's got a little arthritis pain, but she eats real chicken every day and sleeps with her head on my pillow, so I think its still a pretty good life
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Old 09-02-2008, 02:30 PM   #13
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I've had a couple of Rotties have the "fishing line" repair and they both responded great. You'd never know they blew out their knees. No after effects.
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Old 09-02-2008, 04:25 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cute fuzzy bunny View Post
Our pointer/dalmation mix has had both rear acl's go. In the first case it was a partial tear and the crappy vet we had at the time recommended waiting for it to go entirely. It did finally go while we were in the middle of moving. We had the 'fishing line' surgery done because the new vet we went to recommended it since it was inexpensive, moderately effective, and didnt rule out doing the other surgeries in the future. When he operated he found that having waited a long time created extensive arthritis. Had we had the surgery done sooner rather than waiting for a full tear, it would have been nominal.

The extra load from having her favor the leg caused the other leg to go just a little over a year later. We had the bone surgery with a titanium plate done on that one. Minimal arthritis in the joint. The 2.5 month recovery was a good workout for me as I got to carry a 70lb dog up and down 3 flights of stairs the whole time.

About 5 months after the surgery she developed a couple of infections on the leg, which to me looked like they came from inside rather than something external like a bite or puncture. The vet disagreed, thinking it was a foxtail that went in at one site and came out the other. He operated extensively on the leg, found nothing, cleaned out the wound and closed it up. About 3 days after the antibiotic course was done, the sores opened up again.

We went back to the orthopedic surgeon, who suggested it may be a problem with the plate and he removed it. Once she recovered from the 3rd leg surgery in six months she's been fine.

I'm not sure how a titanium plate with stainless steel screws can cause an infection unless there was something wrong with the plate or how it was put in, but everyone said it was 'just one of those things that happens'.

She's now on a daily dose of doggie vioxx to combat the arthritis. We had a lot of trouble with the meds, going through 3 different ones. They all make her puke, although Deramaxx seems to cause her the least trouble. Unfortunately Deramaxx is about $600 a year.

My MIL had the same surgery on her chihuahua's rear leg. Took the same amount of time to recover. Didnt hear about any problems with the plate after that.
CFB, I think you missed your calling. You should have been a vet! I have seen you post so many great replies to treads about animal health issues, including mine
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Old 09-02-2008, 05:11 PM   #15
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I couldnt have done it. I'm too soft.
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Old 09-02-2008, 05:25 PM   #16
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I am so happy people do post here.This communication thing is great.

So happy the conventional surgery went well for the Rotties.

How old were they and how much did they weigh.

Sorry,so many questions but I am a nervous wreck.
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Old 09-02-2008, 05:30 PM   #17
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One other thing. Get a decent supply of neosporin or other "triple antibiotic ointment". Put a warm moist compress on the incision for about 10-15 minutes and then rub a tiny bit of neosporin on the incision a couple of times a day. It'll feel better and heal up a lot faster, and you'll have less chance of an infection.

Just make sure you dont put so much on that the pup can lick it off. Not good for the tummy.
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Old 09-02-2008, 07:20 PM   #18
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Cute/n/Fuzzy,I will go get some tomorrow and keep a good supply on hand.

Don't ever stop posting.
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Old 09-02-2008, 08:04 PM   #19
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One other thing. Get a decent supply of neosporin or other "triple antibiotic ointment". Put a warm moist compress on the incision for about 10-15 minutes and then rub a tiny bit of neosporin on the incision a couple of times a day. It'll feel better and heal up a lot faster, and you'll have less chance of an infection.

Just make sure you dont put so much on that the pup can lick it off. Not good for the tummy.
Cute-n-fuzzy: I told you you should be a vet Yea, I know. I dreamed about being a vet as a little girl but also was too soft hearted. You da best dude.
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Old 09-02-2008, 08:52 PM   #20
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Don't ever stop posting.
I dont think theres much of a chance of that happening at this point
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