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Never Seize
Old 03-14-2008, 07:49 AM   #1
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Never Seize

Not being an overly mechanical type of individual I thought I'd share a discovery with any others like me. Back in December my pickup blew the motor. I had to trade my Harley in to get a new truck. Before I sold the old one for scrap I removed the Fold-a-Cover ($1000 to replace) to put on the new truck (same model). In the process I sheared off several of the stainless steel bolts.

It is true that stainless steel bolts don't rust. However, stainless steel in contact with aluminum does some kind of oxidation that binds them up pretty darned tight. And then the new fasteners won't go in the old threads.

But they sell this stuff called "Never Seize" at auto parts stores. You spread a little on the bottom threads, stick a little in the hole, et voila. It all goes together quite nicely and prevents the build up of that oxidation.

If, like me, you are learning to handle minor work like this yourself I recommend a trip to the auto parts store for the following:

PB Break
Di-electric grease
Never seize

Lessons learned the hard way tend to stick with me.
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:05 AM   #2
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What is PB break - I did a search but nothing related to autos came up
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:06 AM   #3
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try PB blaster
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:43 AM   #4
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The phenomenon of stainless and aluminum welding together is called "galling".

"Never Seize" works well on bolts that get hot too, like exhaust systems.

Galling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:47 AM   #5
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Add one more "must have" to your list....Kroil. When you come across nuts & bolts that are 'frozen' by corrosion, oxidation, rust, or whatever......you just spray a little Kroil on (or dip the parts in some of it), and let 'em sit for a little while (a few minutes to overnight...depending on how bad the situation is), and then put the wrenches to it! I've used it on very badly rusted nuts & bolts, and have gotten them apart......it's only failed me once or twice! The stuff is amazing! It ain't exactly cheap......a can of the spray, "AeroKroil" runs $10 (per can), while a gallon can of Kroil runs $36.40.

WD-40 or PB Blaster (my personal pref is WD-40) works for most things, but Kroil wins the Blue Ribbon!

And like Leatherneck says, 'Never Seize' is marvelous! I first learned about it a little over 30 years ago. We used it when assembling submersible pumps that were going to spend there lifetimes submersed in poo water. After a few years we could pull the pumps out for repairs or maintenance, and the bolts would come out as if they had just been installed.
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Old 03-14-2008, 11:42 AM   #6
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I use this the following on all my silencers so the threads don't stick to the barrel.

Mike D.

Amazon.com: Permatex 80078 Anti-Seize Lubricant 133K, 8 oz Brush-Top Bottle: Automotive
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Old 03-14-2008, 02:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeatherneckPA View Post
But they sell this stuff called "Never Seize" at auto parts stores. You spread a little on the bottom threads, stick a little in the hole, et voila. It all goes together quite nicely and prevents the build up of that oxidation.
Is that the same as something called "anti-seize", which is used by the bucketful in the submarine force?

One precaution would be that it should be used sparingly or it can play havoc with seating surfaces. Not the kind of thing you want to get on gaskets, o-rings, or other pressure-tight boundaries (or what should be pressure-tight).
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Old 03-14-2008, 05:45 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
I use this the following on all my silencers so the threads don't stick to the barrel.

Mike D.

Amazon.com: Permatex 80078 Anti-Seize Lubricant 133K, 8 oz Brush-Top Bottle: Automotive
Have used Anti-Seize for over 40 years in the automotive field. Excellent for head bolts, etc.
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:43 PM   #9
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Is that the same as something called "anti-seize", which is used by the bucketful in the submarine force?

One precaution would be that it should be used sparingly or it can play havoc with seating surfaces. Not the kind of thing you want to get on gaskets, o-rings, or other pressure-tight boundaries (or what should be pressure-tight).
What was the blue crap we put on the primary system valve cap threads? I think it was called Prussian Blue, but it has been a long time. Is that the same stuff mentioned here?
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Old 03-18-2008, 12:56 AM   #10
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What was the blue crap we put on the primary system valve cap threads? I think it was called Prussian Blue, but it has been a long time. Is that the same stuff mentioned here?
Blueing! We used that to check the seating surfaces between the valve's body and the bonnet (steam cuts), or between the disk and the seats (valve lapping). It also had a number of unofficial recreational uses, but this is a family board...

Anti-seize is the gray goopy stuff that was also used liberally by the torpedomen to coat just about every exposed thread on a torpedo, which you'd brush up against every time you went through the room. Otherwise it only existed on the threads between the mating surfaces of two flanged piping sections. If it actually got onto the mating surfaces during final assembly then it'd keep them from seating tightly enough to hold at test depth.

The only way to get anti-seize out of a uniform was to scrub the spot in WD-40, soak it overnight in cold water, and hope that it came out in the washing machine. And heaven help you if you used your spouse's washing machine for that purpose, although I don't want to get into how I learned that.
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Old 03-18-2008, 09:55 AM   #11
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More chemical wonders for fasteners: Loctite threadlock products to keep nuts in place despite vibration, etc. (There's a joke there someplace)
Loctite blue: "I want these parts to stay together, but might want to take them apart someday"
Loctite red: "I'd weld these things together if I could"
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Old 03-18-2008, 10:40 AM   #12
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More chemical wonders for fasteners: Loctite threadlock products to keep nuts in place despite vibration, etc. (There's a joke there someplace)
Loctite blue: "I want these parts to stay together, but might want to take them apart someday"
Loctite red: "I'd weld these things together if I could"
Locktite red: "Wish i could keep the pieces together long enough to ride my Triumph"
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Old 03-19-2008, 06:16 PM   #13
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Boy, I must be a weird guy. I use a copper-based antiseize on oxygen sensors, the aluminum-based stuff on most nuts and bolts (like lug nuts), and Bel-Ray assembly lube on items that get really hot (like manifold nuts). I used to use blue Loctite a lot but have switched to using new lock (star) washers, nylock nuts, or a torque wrench. Back in the day, we used have to locktite the carb on my brothers WR450 Husky to keep the bike running!
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