Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-02-2007, 11:29 AM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
I was in the Dollar Store yesterday. We like to send DD a "Final Exams Survival Kit" which includes home-baked cookies, plus a bunch of silly toys. This year: ping pong ball gun, small clamp on basketball hoop and ball, spiderman digital watch, electronic whoppee cushion, pistachio nuts, raisins, banana chips, butter cookies in a tin, and pacifier lollipops.

Anyway, there's a pair of kids in the toy aisle trying everything, and I hear the Mom say "We're not buying anything here because it's all made in China."
__________________

__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-02-2007, 11:43 AM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Minnehaha
Posts: 2,375
Bought Ping golf irons (USA) last month.
Am now buying Oneida flatware (USA) - although not everything of theirs is from US anymore - I made sure the style we got is.
__________________

__________________
MinnesotaEats - www.goodfoodmsp.com
Danny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2007, 12:14 PM   #23
Moderator Emeritus
Martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 13,212
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
It's not going to be easy. And then there is that pesky old 'law of unintended consequences'.

I was reading recently, think it was "Freakonomics', about the child labor issue. One factory got raided, fired all the kids, and guess what? Many of those kids had to go back to their former 'jobs' as child prostitutes. Sad, but supposedly true.

So it's easy to be against child labor in principle, but what if the alternative is worse? What to do?

-ERD50
I agree. We can easily make this problem worse and I don't have a clue as to what to do about it.

I buy food local to the extent possible, but I am not religious about it. I have not avoided buying from China.
__________________
.


No more lawyer stuff, no more political stuff, so no more CYA

Martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2007, 01:30 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha View Post
I agree. We can easily make this problem worse and I don't have a clue as to what to do about it.
Craig Kielburger is a young man who became an activist against forced child labour at age 12, when he read about the murder of a little boy his own age in Pakistan. He now leads an international network of children helping children to do something about it. He is an amazing speaker. Here are some links. This is a charity that might be worth supporting.

Craig Kielburger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Free The Children - Home
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2007, 07:28 PM   #25
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 37
I've participated in a CSA for the past two years and highly recommend it. Financially it's cheaper for us to purchase produce directly from the farmer plus the food tastes markedly better. Also, since we receive such a large amount of vegetables each week it sort of forces me to eat healthier than I might otherwise.
__________________
redmcclain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 05:58 PM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 7,408
Buy Louisiana Seafood!!

heh heh heh - .
__________________
unclemick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 09:25 PM   #27
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 582
Maybe helpful? American Made Products and/or Services Made in USA

From the website:

"Made in the USA" products need a content consisting of 51% or more of domestically produced or manufactured parts, labor and or value-added content or any combination thereof. The ownership of a company is not the key factor. The fact that a company is a good corporate neighbor by manufacturing or buying goods and services domestically for sale in the local markets and providing jobs, is of key importance. This is a fundamental ingredient of employment stability and economic growth."

They also have links to the NAFTA and FTC definitions for what qualifies.

Sure makes it hard to know what you're buying.
__________________

WM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 09:47 PM   #28
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
It's not going to be easy. And then there is that pesky old 'law of unintended consequences'.

I was reading recently, think it was "Freakonomics', about the child labor issue. One factory got raided, fired all the kids, and guess what? Many of those kids had to go back to their former 'jobs' as child prostitutes. Sad, but supposedly true.

So it's easy to be against child labor in principle, but what if the alternative is worse? What to do?

-ERD50
I think the economists are too quick to let companies off the hook. Surely we can do better than giving ourselves a choice between buying goods made by kids locked in sweatshops vs. abandoning them to be exploited by others.

If the local wage is a few dollars a day (or week!) surely these corporations could afford to invest in the local infrastructure and build a few schools or provide some basic health care.
__________________

WM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 11:13 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by WM View Post
I think the economists are too quick to let companies off the hook. Surely we can do better than giving ourselves a choice between buying goods made by kids locked in sweatshops vs. abandoning them to be exploited by others.

If the local wage is a few dollars a day (or week!) surely these corporations could afford to invest in the local infrastructure and build a few schools or provide some basic health care.
Well, I was just repeating what I read. I do agree with you in principle, it should work that way, but as I understand it, the reality is not always in sync.

I certainly would not complain about a product costing me $55 instead of $53, if I knew the $2 was going to support improving the lives of some hard working people. But companies don't market that very effectively, so people just buy the cheapest thing that will do the job. If they were better informed, they might modify their buying habits.

Free Trade coffee is a decent start.

A while back, Apple was accused of some 'sweatshop' practices in the factories that they contract to make iPods. Turns out that they have a pretty reasonable 'code of conduct' (EIA standard, IIRC) for their overseas plants, and the supposed violations fell apart under investigation.

I'd like to see companies really promote respectable labor and environmental practices, and use it as a selling point. I think a verifiable statement like 'our product was made to such and such labor and environmental standards', like a 'Good-Housekeeping' seal would attract a lot of consumers. I bet the change in retail price would be minimal - maybe pennies. Look what consumers are paying for supposed 'green', or 'organic' products. I bet they would make a lot more money with this approach, even though a few would still go for the cheapest.


-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 11:35 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
cute fuzzy bunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Losing my whump
Posts: 22,697
In a similar vein, its interesting to look at the foreign/domestic parts and labor contents of various automobiles.

A fair number of Fords and Chevys have lower domestic content than some Toyotas and Hondas.
__________________
Be fearful when others are greedy, and greedy when others are fearful. Just another form of "buy low, sell high" for those who have trouble with things. This rule is not universal. Do not buy a 1973 Pinto because everyone else is afraid of it.
cute fuzzy bunny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2007, 07:04 PM   #31
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
Well, I was just repeating what I read.
Yes, that's what I assumed, apologies if I implied otherwise.

I think more information about practices and manufacturing conditions would be great, and I agree that many people would probably pay slightly more for something if they knew it was produced more humanely (for lack of a better word).
__________________

WM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2007, 07:15 PM   #32
Full time employment: Posting here.
jambo101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Montreal
Posts: 940
Lot of companies these days will contract the Chinese to manufacture the pieces of a product then have them shipped to the company where final assembly takes place and a made in America sticker is applied.
Staying away from big box stores is a way to diminish Chinese content in your purchases as most of what they sell comes from some part of Asia.
__________________
"Second star to the right and straight on till morning"
jambo101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2007, 08:36 PM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by WM View Post
Yes, that's what I assumed, apologies if I implied otherwise.

I think more information about practices and manufacturing conditions would be great, and I agree that many people would probably pay slightly more for something if they knew it was produced more humanely (for lack of a better word).
No apology needed, I understand.

I heard again recently about how American consumers 'just want the cheap price' - and it aggravates me. If you don't give a person any other information, of course they go for the cheapest price - why not? Give them some information, and see what they do.

Although I am a cynical person, I am not totally cynical about the average American's desire to be 'fair'. Look at how many billions of dollars in charity are given whenever there is some crisis that makes the news. I find it hard to believe that people would not cough up a buck here and there in purchase price, if they understood it was going to hard working people who were trying to advance themselves and just wanted a decent living.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2007, 08:47 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
youbet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 9,965
Canadians.....

What's happening up there in regard to Chinese imports?
__________________
"I wasn't born blue blood. I was born blue-collar." John Wort Hannam
youbet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2007, 03:23 AM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 886
I realize that my Emmaljunga baby buggy "Made in Sweden" might have some assembly hardware that was made in China, but I at least have a bit more confidence knowing that it's likely to be going through a more rigorous quality control inspection in Emmaljunga, Sweden than it would in Shanghai or Dhaka.

But actually, I haven't had that hard of a time finding things NOT made in China. I just bought a wire basket closet organizer thingy made in Norway and baby scissors made in the Netherlands.

I actually went around the house to see where all the stuff I currently have is made. My refrigerator was made in Lithuania, my gas stove was made in Italy, my TV was made in Korea, my microwave was made in Thailand. Both our cell phones were made in Korea. My car tires were made in Slovenia. That's all I've checked so far.

So it's not impossible. Maybe even a bit easier here in Europe than in the States.
__________________

Trek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2007, 06:17 AM   #36
Full time employment: Posting here.
jambo101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Montreal
Posts: 940
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post
Canadians.....

What's happening up there in regard to Chinese imports?
Walmarts popping up all over.
__________________
"Second star to the right and straight on till morning"
jambo101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2007, 06:49 AM   #37
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 886
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjpliny View Post
I've been seeing more and more people looking for goods not made in China...it's a fairly new phenomenon. I think you could make a LOT of money if you could set up a website/store called "Anything and Everything NOT Made in China"...if you set up a team to research your product sourcing and obtain Certificates of Origin from your suppliers, the business would really be a service type business doing the pre-screening that is taking most of a buyers time when they shop for items. Sort of an Amazon or E-Bay type storefront model, just need to define the scope of initial product families to focus on.
I was thinking of doing something similar here. Opening a niche shop in the wealthy section of the capital called EU Baby. Only sell items made in the EU (plus Norway and Switzerland). But then I got to thinking that would require working so I shelved it.
__________________

Trek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2007, 07:42 AM   #38
Full time employment: Posting here.
bruce1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hagersville
Posts: 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post
Canadians.....

What's happening up there in regard to Chinese imports?
Half the stuff in the Home Hardware Store is made in China. A lot of scary substandard electrical stuff showing up. Also counterfeit Canadian standard association approvals on lots of stuff. The item is marked as meeting standards but was never approved.

Bruce
__________________
I wish I was half as good as my dog thinks I am!
bruce1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2007, 09:23 AM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Goonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North-Central Illinois
Posts: 3,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy View Post
My dad would not own a Japanese car or buy Japanese products, as he was in the army in the Pacific in WWII.
My Dad was the same way. He was a Navy SeaBee on Okinawa, and said he "wouldn't buy a d*mn thing from those SOB's that kept trying to shoot" him! He held on to that until he passed away in '98. If he picked something up while shopping, and saw "Made in Japan" on it, he'd drop it and walk away muttering something about "shoulda dropped a couple more g*ddamn A-bombs". Sometimes I think Norman Lear modeled Archie Bunker after dear ol' Dad!

He DID buy a '68 VW Beetle. He said that was "OK", because the Germans never fired a single shot at him!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cute fuzzy bunny View Post
In a similar vein, its interesting to look at the foreign/domestic parts and labor contents of various automobiles.

A fair number of Fords and Chevys have lower domestic content than some Toyotas and Hondas.
Yeah, I had a "Japanese" '96 Mitsubishi Galant manufactured in Normal, IL.......and my "American" '06 Chevy HHR was built in Ramos Arizpe, Mexico. IIRC, the Galant was ~41% Japanese materials, and ~53% American....the remainder was from parts unknown. I have no idea off the top of head the % of American vs. foreign parts used in the HHR.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruce1 View Post
Half the stuff in the Home Hardware Store is made in China. A lot of scary substandard electrical stuff showing up.
That store is SCARY! I'm very cautious what I purchase there....they carry a sh*t load of crappy, inferior quality JUNK! Fortunately, I have electrical and plumbing supply houses very close by, that deal in QUALITY parts. For other supplies I have an acct with Lawson Products. And for tools I used to prefer Craftsman, S&K, and Snap-On....but have dropped Craftsman from my 'favored' list because quality has been declining.
__________________
Goonie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2007, 11:00 AM   #40
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cute fuzzy bunny View Post
In a similar vein, its interesting to look at the foreign/domestic parts and labor contents of various automobiles.

A fair number of Fords and Chevys have lower domestic content than some Toyotas and Hondas.

That's a really good point Cute Fuzzy Bunny. Many people overlook the fact that a large number of foreign parts are made in the USA and many of the vehicles are actually assembled here. It definitely makes it more difficult for a consumer who is trying to buy domestic.
__________________

__________________
layla17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
China again Ed_The_Gypsy Stock Picking and Market Strategy 6 10-08-2007 02:02 AM
More China news Olav23 FIRE and Money 5 05-20-2007 02:36 PM
China $$$ Coming This Way ? JPatrick FIRE and Money 18 05-15-2007 06:58 AM
Made in U.S., Shunned in China wabmester FIRE and Money 80 12-20-2005 11:14 AM
Walmart is In China Eagle43 Other topics 12 09-26-2005 07:40 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:20 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.