Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-22-2016, 07:39 AM   #81
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,982
Quote:
Originally Posted by donheff View Post
My take on it is that leashed dogs feel insecure when another dog is aggressive and put on a self defensive show. .
Actually, I think the dogs are just protecting their owner in a situation like this. Probably a good thing.
__________________

__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-22-2016, 08:11 AM   #82
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Belleville, ONT
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
Actually, I think the dogs are just protecting their owner in a situation like this. Probably a good thing.
http://www.ourcompanions.org/pdf/Mar...rustration.pdf

Quote:
Dogs don’t like barriers, and psychologically, a leash acts as a barrier to them, preventing access to things they desire.
Although it’s essential to your dog’s safety to be on a leash in public places, the leash may actually cause your dog to
feel vulnerable because she’s unable to communicate with other dogs naturally. A tightly pulled leash interferes with
the dog’s body language, making her appear to be taking a more aggressive stance when encountering another dog.
This can be misinterpreted by other dogs, causing posturing behaviors and angry communications between them!
__________________

__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 08:37 AM   #83
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,982
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemo2 View Post
OK thanks, haven't owned a dog for a while, but thought the protecting owner made sense. It might still come into play, who knows for sure.
__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 09:01 AM   #84
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Belleville, ONT
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
OK thanks, haven't owned a dog for a while, but thought the protecting owner made sense. It might still come into play, who knows for sure.
There was an old Gary Larson Far Side cartoon wherein a car, with a dog leaning out the window, was going down a street, and there's mayhem all around, (nuclear explosion in the distance, buildings on fire with people leaping from windows, shootings, etc, etc, etc)......the dog sees another dog...and the caption was to the effect that "Fido finally saw something to catch his attention".

It's all a matter of what's really important to them.
__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 09:03 AM   #85
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
This! Anyway, in our litiguous society, I am a bit surprised about the officers advice to shoot the dog, unless it started biting. Otherwise, it seems to me that could set you up for a law suit, as well as arrest, especially being in a public park. If it happened on your property, that might be a different story.

Anyway its amazing to me that some folks claim they are dog people, but refuse to control or discipline their pets.
They tell us that in this state, but qualify it's on your property. Could be that when the law was put in place there was no pepper spray.

Yep bad pet owners are a PIA. I'd like to silence my neighbors dog barking at 3AM, but it's the owner who ignores the dog who then, predictably, barks. Maybe the owner needs silenced.
__________________
MRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 09:19 AM   #86
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Dogs that are prone to aggression are definitely more likely to act out when on a leash rather than off lead. It is both a protective thing with the owner and the restrictive nature of the leash.

I say this from the luxury point of having 4 fenced acres for my dogs to roam, but I rarely take my dogs to any public space, especially foster dogs that I do not know well, because of the inherent risks and the potential liability. As a responsible owner, I know I could get my pants sued off if my dogs bit someone.
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 12:45 PM   #87
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,889
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
Actually, I think the dogs are just protecting their owner in a situation like this. Probably a good thing.
I think it depends on the dog. My dog seems oblivious to my safety, but carefully reads every dog we meet and is never aggressive toward people.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 01:21 PM   #88
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Belleville, ONT
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
My dog seems oblivious to my safety
Back in the mid 1990s I took a multi day seminar in British Columbia with a guy from England who traveled the world training, and presenting/judging dogs at shows; he also ran a 'Last chance rehabilitation clinic' in England for aggressive, etc, dogs who would otherwise be put down by court order, (if they failed his course it was pretty much inevitable that that was the end of them).

At one stage he had us all line up, with our dogs standing or sitting by our sides, for 5-10 minutes, just for us to observe how much/little attention our dogs paid to us.......not a whole lot.

Then, he had us periodically give the leashes a slight tug, just to remind the dogs that we were still there.......seems dogs take us for granted most of the time, and react mainly to extenuating circumstances.
__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 01:50 PM   #89
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemo2 View Post

.......seems dogs take us for granted most of the time, and react mainly to extenuating circumstances.
DW tells me it's not just the dogs that act like that.
__________________
MRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 01:51 PM   #90
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Belleville, ONT
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRG View Post
DW tells me it's not just the dogs that act like that.
__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 02:20 PM   #91
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 331
I have to ask: what does everybody mean when they say "aggressive?" To me aggressive is snarling, growling, baring teeth, etc. But where I currently live I've seen people call a dog aggressive if the dog presses up against a leg, jumps, circles, etc even if the dog is wagging its tail while doing so. I can see that being annoying, but I wouldn't call it aggressive. Thoughts?
__________________
FI by 2024 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 02:40 PM   #92
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nemo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Belleville, ONT
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by FI by 2024 View Post
I have to ask: what does everybody mean when they say "aggressive?" To me aggressive is snarling, growling, baring teeth, etc. But where I currently live I've seen people call a dog aggressive if the dog presses up against a leg, jumps, circles, etc even if the dog is wagging its tail while doing so. I can see that being annoying, but I wouldn't call it aggressive. Thoughts?
To me, aggressive is a dog that will threaten to, and carry out an attack on you with the objective of causing a great deal of damage.......the guy I mentioned who ran the rehabilitation clinic told a story about one dog, (that was subsequently destroyed), a pit bull - one of the tools they had was a long flexible pole, (similar to the type you see around pools), with a loop on one end that they could (hopefully) put around the dog's neck, tighten, and keep the animal at a distance.....this particular dog, they looped, and (admittedly he wasn't a big man, but I don't know the size of the others involved) even with five of them trying to navigate the dog into a pen, it was still pushing them backwards.
__________________
"Exit, pursued by a bear."

The Winter's Tale, William Shakespeare
Nemo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 02:41 PM   #93
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,982
Growling, showing teeth, biting, loudly barking while they charge you is my definition of aggressive. Normally, I love to pet dogs I meet when on a walk with the owners permission, even if they are not on a leash.
__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 03:17 PM   #94
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,889
Quote:
Originally Posted by FI by 2024 View Post
I have to ask: what does everybody mean when they say "aggressive?" To me aggressive is snarling, growling, baring teeth, etc.......
You forgot barking, especially when coming toward you. Some dogs stand in place, bark in the air and look around to see if their owners notice. Others bark and charge - those are the ones I consider aggressive.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 03:24 PM   #95
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 331
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
You forgot barking, especially when coming toward you. Some dogs stand in place, bark in the air and look around to see if their owners notice. Others bark and charge - those are the ones I consider aggressive.

I actually purposely left it out, as barking on its own is not aggressive while I would consider snarling, for instance, to be aggressive on its own. But I agree that barking plus charging is aggressive.
__________________
FI by 2024 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 04:32 PM   #96
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
target2019's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by FI by 2024 View Post
I have to ask: what does everybody mean when they say "aggressive?" To me aggressive is snarling, growling, baring teeth, etc. But where I currently live I've seen people call a dog aggressive if the dog presses up against a leg, jumps, circles, etc even if the dog is wagging its tail while doing so. I can see that being annoying, but I wouldn't call it aggressive. Thoughts?

It's aggressive behavior around here. Some kids really have a problem with what we might call friendly behavior.
__________________
target2019 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 05:51 PM   #97
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by FI by 2024 View Post
I have to ask: what does everybody mean when they say "aggressive?" To me aggressive is snarling, growling, baring teeth, etc. But where I currently live I've seen people call a dog aggressive if the dog presses up against a leg, jumps, circles, etc even if the dog is wagging its tail while doing so. I can see that being annoying, but I wouldn't call it aggressive. Thoughts?
Understand your point but folks nearby may find such dog behavior threatening and confusing (esp if they are not dog owners). I think the owner may be legally exposed if any damage occurs - even if it was "not your fault." Keep it a non-kissing encounter - yes, there are still people who see a dog, start a slobbering context and end up with the inevitable - it's a show of submission in the pack.

I am a dog lover and former owner of a spectacular Doberman. She was trained such that if someone approached she was to sit or heal. I held the leash out of reach. If the person asks if he/she can pet the dog, I'll read the dog's general mood and have a treat in my pocket (I give treat to the visitor palm up, dog goes to treat). For kids or adults who seemed unstable for whatever reason, I had them step back and toss the treat a few feet to "play catch."

The dog followed her training >95% of the time. Extreme caution was needed if there was thunder in the air, other overactive dogs nearby.

PS: Got to know a Great Dane while living in Tucson about 15 years ago, nice dog park. Chatted once or twice with the owner until the and his dog disappeared into the sunset. Sophie never liked the guy. Turned out he became a mass murderer in the U. of Arizona School of Nursing.
__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 06:46 PM   #98
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Sophie was a beautiful and incredibly mannerly dog. A true credit to her breed and your care.

And yikes on the mass murderer! My dad's secretary brought her then boyfriend to our house one time when I was a child and our family dog pinned him in a corner, growling and showing teeth. Years later learned he was wanted for a couple of murders! Good dog!
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 06:58 PM   #99
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
Sophie was a beautiful and incredibly mannerly dog. A true credit to her breed and your care.

And yikes on the mass murderer! My dad's secretary brought her then boyfriend to our house one time when I was a child and our family dog pinned him in a corner, growling and showing teeth. Years later learned he was wanted for a couple of murders! Good dog!
Time flies. How many years ago did we visit?
__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 07:12 PM   #100
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 13,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
You forgot barking, especially when coming toward you. Some dogs stand in place, bark in the air and look around to see if their owners notice. Others bark and charge - those are the ones I consider aggressive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FI by 2024 View Post
I actually purposely left it out, as barking on its own is not aggressive while I would consider snarling, for instance, to be aggressive on its own. But I agree that barking plus charging is aggressive.

Barking is an aggressive behavior.... It is the beginning process for some dogs.... barking can lead to other things... It is not the most aggressive a dog can be as growling, showing teeth or even attacking is much worse...



HOWEVER, I think it is very rude for a dog owner to not control their dog.... I have been at the soccer filed watching my daughter and dogs will come up and start rubbing against you... and if it is a HUGE dog (which has happened to me), I do not know if it is friendly or not... heck, even a small dog can bite, but a big dog can do so much more damage in a short amount of time... so IMO, any of the items you mentioned I consider 'aggressive' in my mind as I have no idea what the dog is up to....
__________________

__________________
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Debt problem or spending problem ? frayne FIRE Related Public Policy 9 03-11-2013 08:00 AM
The “not my problem” mindset is a problem. Midpack Other topics 14 05-01-2012 05:42 PM
Need Help: Neighbor Dog Problem TromboneAl Other topics 46 07-22-2010 12:30 PM
Another Dog Problem - How to Deal? Amethyst Other topics 38 05-10-2010 09:09 AM
FI/RE a nice problem to have but still a problem Grizz Hi, I am... 27 06-29-2007 02:29 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:36 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.