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Old 12-14-2011, 07:49 AM   #21
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I love my work immensely and I will keep doing it even after I retire....I am sure of it. Since I work for myself, it does not feel like work at all!
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:06 AM   #22
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People have posted here that they 'failed' to ER. But like others said, most don't hang around much after that. But I think there are a few posting here who went back part-time or something. People are different, it's not for everyone.

If you have trouble filling your free time now (IOW, work is your only interest), then you might have problems. If like many people, you couldn't wait to get away from work to be free do the million things that you want to do, rather than to be told what to do, I expect you'll be fine. More than fine. Way more than fine. Way, way, way (you get the point)

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Old 12-14-2011, 09:22 AM   #23
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What a refreshing thread, retired folks who don't begrudge those who chose to work for their own reasons, and I've seen many similar tolerant posts over the years. The 'all work is evil, retirement is forever no matter what' group has been conspicuously absent from this thread, a pleasant surprise.

(Early) retirement is a wonderful goal and the bulk of the crowd here. But if an individual chooses to work or come out of retirement, there's nothing whatsoever wrong with that either...
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:40 AM   #24
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At my old mega.... they hired this guy after a political fight after a merger... he was in his 70s and very rich... but he did not like to be retired as he could not boss around people like he used to do...

So, he would work long days and expect that from others... he was very rude to people and did not care... heck, he would even talk negative to his boss at times if he thought he was wrong...

He was not working for the money, but the power... having a few billion dollars a year to spend and to make major decisions is enough for some....
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:40 AM   #25
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Retiring at 50 was a goal. When I achieved it, it was a bit of a let down. Kind of "OK, I am here now, what do I do" I worked very hard to achieve an objective but was so busy getting there there I had no plan for what to do when I arrived. Today I have a very good plan of what I will do.

So advice to those wanting to ER. Spend the last 6 months before you arrive understanding what you will do when you get off the merry-go-round. I didn't and ended up going back to work. No regrets, but know now you must have a plan.
I think people who retire early because they have a whole bunch of things they are itching to do instead of working are going to enjoy retirement. These folks are primed, and usually take the leap as soon as they are convinced that they can truly afford it.

People who retire early because they met some magic number (years or $$) or are running away from a bad work situation may find themselves lost when they do retire. This would be particularly true if they hadn't developed any interests outside work. It is pretty critical to develop some outside interests before launching out of the work environment. It can be a bit of a catch22 however. If you are working too much, that might keep you from doing other things. Maybe these folks need to figure out a way to scale back somehow so they have time for life outside of work. This can still be difficult if you are in a hard-driven, high-stress work environment.

Retirement also doesn't mean that you are limited to travel or purely recreative activities (like reading books, golf, boating, fishing, or watching TV). Retirement means you can do ANYTHING you want with your time within your financial resources. Some people may end up as busy and putting in as much effort as when they were working - or maybe even more. The point is that their time is their own, and they are the ones setting the goals and calling the shots. No one else is looking over their shoulder and telling them what to do.

People who are their own boss or run a business have some of the autonomy benefits of a retiree as they have a lot more control over their environment than the average wage slave. However, he who pays the bills still rules, and this means the customer. As long as you are financially dependent on your customer/clients you will be dancing to their tune. But once you are financially independent, you can even pick and choose your customers and only do the jobs that really interest you.

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Old 12-14-2011, 12:15 PM   #26
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Texas Proud said:At my old mega.... they hired this guy after a political fight after a merger... he was in his 70s and very rich... but he did not like to be retired as he could not boss around people like he used to do...



That comment made me laugh.... But I wouldnt think it was so funny if I had to work under him.
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Old 12-14-2011, 12:17 PM   #27
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I've been looking at ER since I joined ER but haven't been able to pull the trigger. Finances should be there.

It's not that I enjoy my job, though there are a lot of good days on the job. But I enjoy the time off and I get 4 weeks of vacation every year and the job is easy most of the time.

Maybe it is about being too settled into a routine. Mainly though, there's still some uncertainty in the macroeconomy and it would be good to see how the health care thing settles out. I'm not depending on it for ER but it would clear some of the uncertainty.
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Old 12-14-2011, 12:26 PM   #28
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At my old mega.... they hired this guy after a political fight after a merger... he was in his 70s and very rich... but he did not like to be retired as he could not boss around people like he used to do...

So, he would work long days and expect that from others... he was very rude to people and did not care... heck, he would even talk negative to his boss at times if he thought he was wrong...

He was not working for the money, but the power... having a few billion dollars a year to spend and to make major decisions is enough for some....
There are a lot of executives, like Steve Ballmer who is worth billions and yet, whose tenure as CEO has come under heavy criticism. His company is very profitable but it's mostly from businesses set up by his predecessor.

So what rewards motivate someone like him to keep working? Is he a true believer in his company?

Same thing with someone like Larry Ellison, who does have a lot of outside interests, funded by his already immense wealth.

Then there are a lot of executives who aren't well known but who probably have accumulated at least $10 million, after taxes, who keep working too.

Maybe it seems to us they have more money than they'll ever spend but they could have some extravagant lifestyles too. Or at least their families and entourage do.
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Old 12-14-2011, 12:33 PM   #29
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I loved my job. Didn't mind working 70 hour weeks with 300,000 miles a year of international travel. It was fun, exciting and paid obscenely well. Did it for 30 years.

BUT! When the company was sold, I was offered a lower position or a buy-out. Took the money and ran! Never looked back.
Family worried that Id go mad but I found there were so many things that interested me outside of the job. Things I had missed for 30 years. Like a lot of FIREs I dont know how I had time to work.
The key is to realize that it can take 1,2 or 3 YEARS to get into the new lifestyle. It is NOT "being on vacation" every day! Recognize it as a different (better) way of life.
Everyone is different, but there is a whole world out there beyond the 9 to 5.
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:23 PM   #30
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Probably not the best place to ask...
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:57 PM   #31
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The way things have been going at work this month (and for that matter most months), I would enjoy standing on my head more than continuing to work in this nut house.
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Old 12-14-2011, 02:31 PM   #32
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But if an individual chooses to work or come out of retirement, there's nothing whatsoever wrong with that either...
... as long as they're paying FICA!
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Old 12-14-2011, 04:12 PM   #33
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There are a lot of executives, like Steve Ballmer who is worth billions and yet, whose tenure as CEO has come under heavy criticism. His company is very profitable but it's mostly from businesses set up by his predecessor.

So what rewards motivate someone like him to keep working? Is he a true believer in his company?

Same thing with someone like Larry Ellison, who does have a lot of outside interests, funded by his already immense wealth.

Then there are a lot of executives who aren't well known but who probably have accumulated at least $10 million, after taxes, who keep working too.

Maybe it seems to us they have more money than they'll ever spend but they could have some extravagant lifestyles too. Or at least their families and entourage do.
I think the difference between someone like Larry Ellison and the guy I mentioned is that Larry does have a LOT of outside interests... the amount of time he spends running his business interest is probably not that great... the amount of time the guy I mentioned worked was in the 50 to 80 hour per week range.... and he was traveling about 4 days a week...

I do agree that there are probably a good number of $10 million people who keep working... but I bet a lot have life styles that $10 million would not support..
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Old 12-14-2011, 05:57 PM   #34
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I like retirement fine. It's just that I also like to take breaks from it, if and when some interesting work comes my way.

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I've been looking at ER since I joined ER but haven't been able to pull the trigger. Finances should be there.

It's not that I enjoy my job, though there are a lot of good days on the job. But I enjoy the time off and I get 4 weeks of vacation every year and the job is easy most of the time.

Maybe it is about being too settled into a routine. Mainly though, there's still some uncertainty in the macroeconomy and it would be good to see how the health care thing settles out. I'm not depending on it for ER but it would clear some of the uncertainty.
Four weeks/year would not be enough for me. Even four months/year would not be enough, and I only work 40hrs/week in short busts. I am getting old and need nap time to refresh my brain. So, like to work from home if at all possible.

Oh, and about the money bringing some extra security, I would be a liar if I said I didn't enjoy that. Heh heh heh... (Is Uncle Mick around? Is he going to sue me?)
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:37 PM   #35
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Well it's 4 weeks of vacation accrued, another dozen holidays.

When working extra hours, it can be done from home.

I guess breaking the habit, a routine you've known for 20-30 years is difficult. Maybe like soldiers returning from war adjusting to civilian life or emancipated slaves having to figure out their new life.

Or someone who was kidnapped for years, maybe succumbing to Stockholm syndrome and then facing freedom.
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Old 12-14-2011, 11:08 PM   #36
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I guess breaking the habit, a routine you've known for 20-30 years is difficult. Maybe like soldiers returning from war adjusting to civilian life or emancipated slaves having to figure out their new life.

Or someone who was kidnapped for years, maybe succumbing to Stockholm syndrome and then facing freedom.
I think you are right about that. It's scary for any of those who do not like change (and that includes me), to make a big change like that. The last few minutes were especially scary - - turning in my badge and leaving the building felt both exciting and completely terrifying, as I imagine bungee jumping might feel. I thought "OMG, what am I DOING!" but just smiled weakly and left. I felt prepared financially, probably, but really hadn't put much thought into the psychological aspects. So for a few hours I was in "what now, am I doing this right?" mode.

But then the next day everything started to fall into place and my adjustment turned out to be pretty easy, thank goodness. Since that time, I have developed another routine that I like. Works for me. I admit that prior to retiring, I was absolutely determined to retire and completely sure that this step was what I wanted. That probably helped.

As for going back to work, each to his own (and I mean that, Midpack and NW-Bound!). But for me, I have even been avoiding going back to visit for fear that somehow they will snag me and KEEP me there to work for years to come. I know that's unrealistic. I do look on the internet to see what my agency is doing but that's as close as I want to come to my former workplace.
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Old 12-15-2011, 01:25 PM   #37
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Just a thought.......
Like 12ridehd, I had a practice retirement, an ultimately went back to w**k (mainly because I missed the fun of poking holes in the ground an gettng paid for it). I've come to realize that anything worthwhile - whether playing a musical instrument, playing a sport, whatever - takes practice, so I look at my previous retirement as a practice round. Learned some interesting things about myself and what my expectations were (realistic and un-realistic), so will be better prepared to excel the next time.

In the meantme, I've enjoyed the new j*b immensely, partially because I know that I'm here because I want to be, not because I have to. (And partially because of the money, of course!)
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Old 12-15-2011, 01:34 PM   #38
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But then the next day everything started to fall into place and my adjustment turned out to be pretty easy, thank goodness. Since that time, I have developed another routine that I like. Works for me.
Well, there's my problem in a nutshell: I don't have any routines. I don't have set bedtimes, meal times, wake up times. Things just sort of happen and I react (that's probably why I enjoy my job so much - nothing is predictable). And one of my reactions is not to react - I'm a world-class sitter. I've developed powerful muscles that allow me to sit for hours on end without doing anything. It's a skill that took years of practice to develop :-)
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Old 12-15-2011, 01:57 PM   #39
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Old 12-15-2011, 02:17 PM   #40
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The way things have been going at work this month (and for that matter most months), I would enjoy standing on my head more than continuing to work in this nut house.
LOL!!!
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