Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Plumbing advice
Old 09-08-2017, 07:40 AM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
donheff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 9,449
Plumbing advice

I have a leak in a bathroom sink in an area that is integral with the sink so I believe the proper fix is to replace the sink. But I don't really feel like doing that until I remodel the bathroom in a few years. I am incompetent at DYI activities but I respect the skills of many of you on ER Forums I hope you can give me a plumbing consultation. Looking at the companion sink I see a plug of some sort of putty in the same spot as the leak in this sink. I vaguely remember putting the plug onto the area where the overflow connects to the bottom of the sink in the companion sink when I got a similar leak a few years ago. The current leak appears to be in the area below the overflow entrance but I am guessing I could get a few years out of the thing with a patch.

I am curious about what the best patch would be. Is this what is called "pipe dope," or is there a better patch material? The leak is in the discolored area just below the point where the overflow pipe comes in at the base of the sink in photo 1. It is the area just below the patch in photo 2.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Sink1.jpg (319.8 KB, 47 views)
File Type: jpg Sink2.jpg (316.0 KB, 40 views)
__________________

__________________
Every man is, or hopes to be, an Idler. -- Samuel Johnson
donheff is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-08-2017, 07:42 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 45,495
Oatey 14 oz. Plumber's Putty-311662 - The Home Depot

or

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Oatey-9-o...1177/203013821

Plumber's Putty...
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

Charter resident of the lumpen slums of cyberspace

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 08:14 AM   #3
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
calmloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Independence
Posts: 6,057
Plumber's putty is like glazier's putty or modeling clay - it tends to dry and crack over time and doesn't stick well. Think for that patch I'd clean like mad, assure dryness with a hairdryer, and use epoxy.
calmloki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 08:26 AM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Treasure Coast
Posts: 472
This is the stuff you want. Easy to work with, and incredibly strong. I used it to seal a very thin crack in the bottom of a toilet tank. Worked like magic.


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
45th Birthday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 09:29 AM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
calmloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Independence
Posts: 6,057
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45th Birthday View Post
This is the stuff you want. Easy to work with, and incredibly strong. I used it to seal a very thin crack in the bottom of a toilet tank. Worked like magic.


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Was thinking more a thick paint on type to allow getting behind the pipe - or maybe Goop or Shoe Goo.

https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-GOOP-...&keywords=goop
calmloki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 09:42 AM   #6
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Sunset's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Spending the Kids Inheritance and living in Chicago
Posts: 7,238
Clean it very well, and use some silicone caulk, don't use the sink for 24 hours so it can dry.

Pretty much any caulking for outdoor use will last you a few years, silicone will last 20.
Sunset is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 11:45 AM   #7
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 11,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45th Birthday View Post
This is the stuff you want. Easy to work with, and incredibly strong. I used it to seal a very thin crack in the bottom of a toilet tank. Worked like magic.


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
+1 on the epoxy putty. This stuff really sticks and is very strong.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 12:00 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Scrapr's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Bend
Posts: 1,045
Ummm.......maybe it's too obvious.

duct tape!
Scrapr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 01:07 PM   #9
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunset View Post
Clean it very well...
+1

Any of your attempts will fail unless you clean the surface well.
I might even suggest grinding or sanding the surface to have a fresh substrate to bond caulk or epoxy to. Being a porous surface it will be extremely hard to get it completely clean, but that is your only hope. You could probably also do this with a bathtub glazing product.
NgineER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 01:11 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,838
What is the purpose of the hole to start with? Why would the sink have that spot?.
__________________
Withdrawal Rate currently zero, Pension 137 % of our spending, Wasted 5 years of my prime working extra for a safe withdrawal rate. I can live like a King for a year, or a Prince for the rest of my life. I will stay on topic, I will stay on topic, I will stay on topic
Blue Collar Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 01:20 PM   #11
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Florence, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 3,681
I have a small, slow leak in a kitchen drain at the threads. I am going to use a gray teflon tape on the threads.
Bamaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 01:37 PM   #12
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 21,673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
I have a small, slow leak in a kitchen drain at the threads. I am going to use a gray teflon tape on the threads.
I was having a heck of a time getting our drains threaded onto the kitchen sink flange, they kept crossing, no matter how hard I tried to keep it straight.

Then I used some kind of pipe thread sealant that I think was also a lubricant, it was like toothpaste consistency, or maybe thick grease? Slipped right on the first time, and never leaked.

I think the tape was maybe 'pulling' the flange crooked or something, I dunno, but that paste worked wonders.

-ERD50
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 01:44 PM   #13
Moderator
samclem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 14,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Collar Guy View Post
What is the purpose of the hole to start with? Why would the sink have that spot?.
No purpose, the hole wasn't there to start with. It seems like an unusual place to have a problem--was it bumped/chipped from the outside?

Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
+1 on the epoxy putty. This stuff really sticks and is very strong.
+2. The Rectorseal brand will work, but almost any other kind of epoxy putty should do the trick. Carefully grinding or sanding the existing porcelain to get an uncontaminated surface would be ideal, but just cleaning it very well with the usual solvents (soap and water, vinegar to dissolve scale/lime, and a once-over with acetone if you have any handy) would probably be enough. Make sure it is completely dry (e.g a day or so with no use) before applying the epoxy. Press a thin layer of epoxy putty very firmly into the mating surface of the sink to make sure it gets into every cranny, then quickly (before it starts to set) put the big glob over the top to bridge the hole. I think it will probably stay fixed for a long time if there are no immediate leaks.
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Plumbing advice
Old 09-08-2017, 02:20 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,640
Plumbing advice

Plumbers putty is meant to fill the tiny ridges in a threaded fitting... not stop a leak. Get some epoxy. Temporary fix at best.
rayinpenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2017, 03:16 PM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 164
Use a wire brush to remove loose stuff, rough sand, and then clean with lacquer thinner or equivalent. Apply a good name brand epoxy putty after mixing/kneading in accordance with the instructions and the repair will probably outlast you
btdt22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2017, 10:49 AM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
donheff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 9,449
To close out I used epoxy and it worked. Thanks for the recommendations.
__________________
Every man is, or hopes to be, an Idler. -- Samuel Johnson
donheff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2017, 04:20 PM   #17
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Sunset's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Spending the Kids Inheritance and living in Chicago
Posts: 7,238
Quote:
Originally Posted by donheff View Post
To close out I used epoxy and it worked. Thanks for the recommendations.
Thanks for letting us know..
__________________

Sunset is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sharkbite no-solder plumbing: it rocks. Nords Other topics 3 05-08-2009 09:51 AM
Winter Plumbing issues? vvsonikvv Other topics 25 02-10-2009 06:28 PM
Can you help my plumbing problem? -With pictures! Kronk Other topics 22 08-09-2008 03:47 PM
Plumbing and Heating questions Khan Other topics 7 02-17-2008 08:03 AM
nonunion plumbing question lazygood4nothinbum Other topics 2 08-23-2007 01:23 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:32 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×