Join Early Retirement Today
View Poll Results: What do YOU consider the most likely threat to YOUR retirement plan?
Depressions/recessions/hyperinflation/inflation 27 29.03%
Tax code changes/pension failures 4 4.30%
Personal (health, divorce, auto accident, gambling, family, etc.) 46 49.46%
Geopolitical/wars (Nuclear, terrorism, etc.) 5 5.38%
Climate change related (water, crops, extreme weather, etc.) 0 0%
Natural disasters (earthquakes, volcanoes, pandemic, etc.) 0 0%
Asteroid/comet 0 0%
Other (zombies, aliens, etc.) 2 2.15%
None, I am confident things will be great all in all 9 9.68%
Voters: 93. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Poll: What's the most likely threat to YOUR retirement plan?
Old 12-13-2014, 10:57 AM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,978
Poll: What's the most likely threat to YOUR retirement plan?

Just the poll naturally stemming from the related "ruinous" thread a few days back.

If you don't like the choices, they came directly from the other thread...
__________________

__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-13-2014, 11:01 AM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,972
Not being physically able to do my current job. If I can't do this job I have a very limited number of jobs i'm qualified for and physically able to do. I'm not near FI so I need income for many more years.
__________________

__________________
aaronc879 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 11:03 AM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
jfn111's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Bloomington, MN
Posts: 205
A long Bear Market coupled with high inflation would hurt.
__________________
jfn111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 11:07 AM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,417
Most of the threats I see are personal. Death, depression, disability, dementia, divorce, descendants, despair, disease, disempowerment, and so on...
__________________
6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 12:43 PM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Goonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North-Central Illinois
Posts: 3,198
When it comes to life, I'm a die-hard optimist. So about the only thing that would have a major detrimental impact on my retirement is my own death. YMMV
__________________
Goonie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 01:20 PM   #6
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Mulligan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7,382
If some A-hole cuts my pension.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
Mulligan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 01:26 PM   #7
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
mickeyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: South Texas~29N/98W
Posts: 5,884
Because of our military and VA pensions, I cast my vote for the last selection. Even if we have a bad situation occur, I don't see any long-term negatives that we can not survive.
__________________
Part-Owner of Texas

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

In dire need of: faster horses, younger woman, older whiskey, more money.
mickeyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 01:39 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,587
I figure that I am able to deal with personal issues, as to most extent they are within my control. Sure they could make things difficult or significantly change plans. However, as sustained period of recession or depression with high inflation would make it the most threat to me. The financial impacts from recession and inflation are essentially beyond my control.
__________________
After Monday & Tuesday even the calendar says, W-T-F...

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/16 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 01:42 PM   #9
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,933
Obviously New Orleans is subject to devastating hurricanes and their perils, but even so I voted for hyperinflation. I could recover from complete hurricane destruction of my home and all contents easily even if insurance reimbursement disappointed me or failed me (since they are not worth much), but hyperinflation?

From Wikipedia, Hyperinflation in Zimbabwe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
Zimbabwe's peak month of inflation is estimated at 79.6 billion percent in mid-November 2008.
I lived through the inflation we had here in the US during the 1970's and 1980's, and that was tough. I don't personally believe that the CPI would keep up with over a million percent inflation (so much for our COLAs, TIPS, etc). I just don't see how any of us could feel confident if faced with 79.6 billion percent inflation in a month.

So while it is unlikely, and so possibly not what you are looking for, I still think hyperinflation is so devastating that it is the greatest of those perils listed. The most probable is probably something much less disastrous and easier to overcome, like identity theft.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 01:49 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rustic23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lake Livingston, Tx
Posts: 3,624
I voted Hyperinflation also. We have enough COLA adjusted pensions to keep up, however, they only adjust once a month. In a hyperinflation market, we may need a daily adjustment just to survive, and I have no faith government could keep up with that type of a situation.
__________________
If it is after 5:00 when I post I reserve the right to disavow anything I posted.
Rustic23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 02:54 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,978
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
So while it is unlikely, and so possibly not what you are looking for, I still think hyperinflation is so devastating that it is the greatest of those perils listed. The most probable is probably something much less disastrous and easier to overcome, like identity theft.
I'm a little surprised by the voting so far, but I wasn't presuming or "looking for" any particular response(s), other than maybe asteroids finishing low on the poll. Thanks for your thoughts/vote, clearly a significant number of members agree with your POV.
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 03:04 PM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,495
Was looking for the dreaded sequence of returns option for those of us on the cusp of ER. Surprised to see at this point 54% see something of a personal nature impacting them. Other than perhaps an unexpected serious health condition, personal is no issue for me.

I already have lots of experience with zombies living in a city loaded with them (lost angeles) so they pose no threat...
__________________
Options is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 03:48 PM   #13
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Options View Post
Was looking for the dreaded sequence of returns option for those of us on the cusp of ER. Surprised to see at this point 54% see something of a personal nature impacting them. Other than perhaps an unexpected serious health condition, personal is no issue for me.
Sequence of returns risk seems unlikely without depression/recession so I'd lump it in there. But I took the options from the other thread, and I don't remember anyone mentioning SORR specifically.

I wasn't expecting Personal to be the leading threat either, but then that's why I did a poll, to find out what others think...
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 04:28 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,417
With medical problems being the leading cause of personal bankruptcy and the cost of health care going up by the moment, I would have expected 'personal' to be the leading cause. Many of the widespread economic problems will be shared by everyone so tend to be less personally devastating. Even in Zimbabwe and other places with significant inflation, life goes on. People are resourceful and ingenious. Barter economies and other adaptations arise that allow things to function.
__________________
6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 04:29 PM   #15
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,571
While I picked hyperinflation, almost any of the other options would do a number on my pension plans too.

Getting very sick and just lying in bed is not in my plans.

Neither is getting bombed in a war.

Comets, asteroids and zombies (!?) would pretty much screw things up too.

Weather extremes would make life unpleasant as well.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 06:17 PM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,436
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6miths View Post
With medical problems being the leading cause of personal bankruptcy and the cost of health care going up by the moment, I would have expected 'personal' to be the leading cause. Many of the widespread economic problems will be shared by everyone so tend to be less personally devastating. Even in Zimbabwe and other places with significant inflation, life goes on. People are resourceful and ingenious. Barter economies and other adaptations arise that allow things to function.
That's also how I voted. Other than financial hardship, serious illness may bring about such reduction in quality of life to make you truly miserable. Or you may not have any life at all, to spare you the worry of inflation.

If one's retirement is reasonably funded and comes from more than one source, even a serious reduction in wealth should not cause you to have to claim a spot under a bridge. Most people are resilient, and can adapt to having less if it should happen.

Having less to spend does not have to mean one's life is doomed to wretchedness. One can park an RV in a New Mexico state park and have electric and water hookup for a few bucks a day. The locations are nowhere near any movie theater or shopping mall, let alone fancy restaurants or nightclubs, but if one is into living in open spaces and enjoying nature he/she would not think of it as reduction in life quality.
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2014, 07:50 PM   #17
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern Michigan
Posts: 732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Options View Post
Surprised to see at this point 54% see something of a personal nature impacting them. Other than perhaps an unexpected serious health condition, personal is no issue for me.
I'm not at all surprised that personal is the leading vote-getter. Family issues are easily the biggest threat to my retirement. My wife and I can control our expenses and our overall financial situation, but we can't control our daughter's (my step-daughter) financial situation, which affects us whether we like it or not. Simply cutting off our relationship with her is not an option, due mostly to the two grandkids, who would otherwise be in trouble (the fathers of each kid are not involved in their upbringing). We obviously can't run her life for her (though she needs someone to do it), but we also can't just walk away and ingore it, either (which I would be tempted to do, were it not for the two grandkids). So this situation will probably go on for decades, whether we like it or not. It's impossible to plan our yearly expenses when we just don't know from one week/month to the next what the latest financial setback will be for the step-daughter, and how much it's going to cost us. I'm assuming that at least a few others can relate to this type of situation??
__________________
RAE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2014, 06:30 AM   #18
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 685
Not in the poll that I could see, but the biggest threat to me was a layoff, especially late in my career. The other items are mostly out of my control, and I can mitigate some of the recession concerns with a lower risk allocation
__________________

__________________
48Fire is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Autos most likely to be ticketed? My Camry Solara? WTF??? Orchidflower Other topics 6 10-18-2010 07:24 PM
The real threat to retirement is beginning to emerge dex Other topics 18 03-29-2008 12:02 PM
Citigroup Paper: The Global Retirement Crisis - Threat to World Stability chinaco FIRE and Money 1 03-20-2007 03:18 PM
Study Says Taller People Generally Smarter - More Likely To ER? Danny Other topics 48 10-28-2006 11:08 AM
Hope for those who likely will have no pension? Susan Powell Young Dreamers 31 04-04-2004 05:43 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:00 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.