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Old 01-24-2019, 06:08 PM   #61
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MicroSD cards are so small that they can easily fit in a wallet. Backup docs to one and have you have another form of off site storage. And always encrypt your info.
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Old 01-24-2019, 06:50 PM   #62
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Yikes! Sorry you are having troubles. I don't have SSD on my home computer (and it has a robust backup system), but my laptop does have an SSD. I keep all my data on the cloud for the laptop. Maybe I should be doing a backup to a physical drive as well. It's a MacBook so maybe a time machine backup will do.
Time Machine backups can occasionally get corrupted. You might want to consider having two Time Machine drives. If both are connected, TM will alternate between them. You can also just connect the second one occasionally, and even use it for an offsite backup.
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Old 01-24-2019, 07:05 PM   #63
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Im a borderline power user of Macs (using them since 87). But my conservative/skeptical nature wont let me rely totally on their reliability. I have Time Machine running all the time for constant incremental backup but I also have the whole thing backed up every night to two separate drives, one using SuperDuper and the other using Carbon Copy Cloner. Call me paranoid but I feel pretty safe. There is still another backup in the fireproof safe that is updated monthly.
Sounds similar to my level of paranoia, maybe a bit worse. I don't like having TM running all the time, so I have its automatic backups turned off and manually kick it off at least daily, unless I'm only doing stuff like web browsing and email, which don't save anything critical on the local drive. I run QRecall occasionally to provide an alternative source of versioned backups to TM. I also make periodic CCC clones, particularly before doing any OS update. I have 3-4 backup sets each for my Mac and DW's, with one always offsite in a safe deposit box.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:27 AM   #64
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Time Machine backups can occasionally get corrupted.
I'm wondering how you discovered this. Did you restore a file that appeared damaged? I'm not quite a year into moving from Windows to Mac so haven't got tons of personal experience that others do.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:44 AM   #65
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I'm wondering how you discovered this. Did you restore a file that appeared damaged? I'm not quite a year into moving from Windows to Mac so haven't got tons of personal experience that others do.
Curious about this as well. Been using Time Machine for 10 years but have never needed it, so not sure if it gets corrupted or not.

My backup scheme is robust as we lost everything in 1996. My iMac has a 1TB hybrid drive that runs only the OS. Data is on a 1+1 Thunderbolt Raid array. That is backed up daily via Chronosync to another 1+1 raid array. It is also backed up daily to a Time Machine drive. I also backup monthly to an external USB drive that lives in the safe. I also backup semi annually to a USB drive that my MIL keeps in her safe. In addition, all my data sans photos/videos is held on One Drive on the web. I don't keep the photo/video library on the web as it is over 1TB of data.
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Cheap SSD's
Old 02-05-2019, 05:46 PM   #66
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Cheap SSD's

Cheap Kingston SSD's with no cache at Walmart and Amazon

http://t.email.slickdeals.net/r/?id=..._v2&p7=5044185
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Old 02-05-2019, 06:30 PM   #67
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SSD and HD are relatively inexpensive.

I have two 500GB SSD by Crucial (currently $68 each on Amazon) which holds my operating system and two 4TB HD (currently $86 each on Amazon) which holds my data. They are exact clones of each other so one set of SSD/HD (primary) are in use in the PC and the other set of SSD /HD (backup) are in a box unconnected to the PC and the dangerous internet. It is like having a second PC on standby.

My best investment are two Kingwin Universal Mobile Hot Swap ($14 each on Amazon). This allows me to swap out the SSD or HD without opening the PC. It makes the SSD and HD function like a memory stick !!!

I transfer new data or files on a SanDisk 128 GB USB memory stick and then swap out the SSD and HD to transfer the new data or files to the backup. I then remove the backup SSD and HD from the PC and install the primary SSD and HD.

In the past, I used Acronis True Image to create image files but having a backup SSD and HD are more faster, more convenient and Acronis True Image software can be buggy.

If the primary SSD and HD goes bad for any reason, the backup SSD and HD saves the day with a simple swap. It used to take me hours to recover for a hardware failure or a virus but not any more! If it is a virus, I format the SSD or HD and then clone it using the backup. If it is a hardware failure, I simply buy new hardware and clone it. Not perfect but it works for me.
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Old 02-05-2019, 06:41 PM   #68
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Nice. I haven't done a build in 8 years. I'll want to include something like this.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:20 PM   #69
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Make sure you have enough 5.25 inch bays in your new build since you probably need one for a DVD drive, and 2 for my recommended Kingwin Hot swaps. I suggest four or five 5.25 bays since you may need one empty for the future.

For example, I did not like the idea that the Kingwin Hot swap would leave the HD partial outside where moisture and dust can get to it so I got another Kingwin Hot Swap that allows the HD to be completely hidden inside the PC and protected.

However, it only works for HD and not the smaller SSD. But I need at least 2 hot swaps for both SSD and HD to cloning via SATA cables and not USB As a result, I have 3 Kingwin hot swaps installed and I do not have an extra 5.25 bay.

As you can tell, I hate opening the PC just to install a new SSD or HD when the Kingwin hot swaps devices makes life so much easier.

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Old 02-05-2019, 07:27 PM   #70
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".....mostly so people can add responses about how diligent they are in backup and shame the rest of us into backing up better. "

Yup. Everyone should have a second SSD and make an image of their primary to the secondary. If your system crashes, just buy another SSD and get your system back up with the image. Another way to do it is to do a RAID array where you have a duplicate drive, just puts a little extra stress on your computer. Another way is when you start seeing your SSD do weird things....don't ignore it. OF NOTE: If your SSD dies all at once, it is often recoverable - see youtube for this. If it is dying a slow death and giving you all kinds of hints, you are more than likely SOL.
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Old 02-05-2019, 08:15 PM   #71
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If it is dying a slow death and giving you all kinds of hints, you are more than likely SOL.

I can vouch for this.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:01 PM   #72
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I store critical files on a usb drive. Make sure you do it on more than one drive as Windows 10 does not give a Safe to Remove flag with the new updates and you can corrupt a usb drive easily with this default.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:04 PM   #73
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My best investment are two Kingwin Universal Mobile Hot Swap ($14 each on Amazon). This allows me to swap out the SSD or HD without opening the PC. It makes the SSD and HD function like a memory stick !!!

Darn you, you've stirred up the "build/upgrade servers" cells in my brain... I will look to include these on my next build adventure .
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:36 PM   #74
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Darn you, you've stirred up the "build/upgrade servers" cells in my brain... I will look to include these on my next build adventure .
Those things sound like a good idea, but are flaky. Easier and a lot more dependable solution is to buy another SSD. A good setup is to do something like the following:

SSD 1: Two partitions (C & D): (C)WINDOWS & (D)Factory Recovery
SSD 2: Two partitions (F & G): (F)BACKUP (ICO OF WINDOWS & D) & (G)MEDIA

Skipped E drive because it is typically optical.

As an example my C drive has 267GB on it now. To create an image on the F drive takes less than 10 minutes. If the C drive crashes, unpacking the image from F to C takes less than 15 minutes. Make an image weekly, and the drive life will be in the thousands of years from the read/write standpoint. There is always a chance of a mechanical failure of course, but there isn't a lot of 'mechanics' to a SSD. The best way to keep any component in PC from failing is to have an UPS system to keep voltage correct, and prevent surges. Every PC should have an UPS, without fail.
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:58 PM   #75
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If the primary SSD and HD goes bad for any reason, the backup SSD and HD saves the day with a simple swap.
You should keep at least one of your SSD/HD combo's at another location in case your house is destroyed by fire, flood, tornado, hurricane, etc.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:35 PM   #76
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OF NOTE: If your SSD dies all at once, it is often recoverable - see youtube for this. If it is dying a slow death and giving you all kinds of hints, you are more than likely SOL.
This is exactly backwards in my experience. If your SSD is flaky, you can often get data off of it before it dies. Once it's dead, uh...it's dead.

Under the hood, SSDs are designed to do all sorts of heroic acts to preserve your data until they can't any more, so unless you're checking bad block growth via SMART attributes or NAND soft errors (which they won't tell you about), you almost certainly won't know about the problems until the drive dies for good...but that will happen a lot later in almost every case. About the only non-recoverable error on a consumer SSD is infant mortality of an entire NAND die, which is so rare that it will happen to someone but it won't be you. ;-) And a commercial SSD will either have internal RAID or be in a RAID array itself.
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Old 02-06-2019, 08:29 AM   #77
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Since it's a matter of if, not when, drives will fail, and I'm paranoid about my data, I've found a good way of thinking about backup is the 3-2-1 backup strategy: 3 total copies of the data, 2 of which are local but different mediums, and at least one copy offsite.

A good summary of this can be found at https://www.backblaze.com/blog/the-3...ckup-strategy/.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:12 AM   #78
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Since it's a matter of if, not when, drives will fail, and I'm paranoid about my data, I've found a good way of thinking about backup is the 3-2-1 backup strategy: 3 total copies of the data, 2 of which are local but different mediums, and at least one copy offsite.
That's basically the approach I use. My copy 1 data resides on my internal hard drive. Copy 2 is an external hard drive I backup to nightly. Copy 3 is a second external drive I swap with #2 about once a month.

Once a year or so, I also backup important files to BluRay discs, just for added protection.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:28 AM   #79
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A good setup is to do something like the following:

SSD 1: Two partitions (C & D): (C)WINDOWS & (D)Factory Recovery
SSD 2: Two partitions (F & G): (F)BACKUP (ICO OF WINDOWS & D) & (G)MEDIA

Skipped E drive because it is typically optical.
I have:

Drive C: - 250GB SSD for Windows and Applications (148GB free)

Drive D: - 2TB SSD for personal data files (1.13TB free)

Drive F: - CD/DVD/Bluray Drive

Drive G: - Internal SD card reader

Drive T: - 10GB encrypted virtual drive for financial and medical records (actual file resides on D: drive).

Drive W: - 1TB SSD used for video work (2-8GB free, varies daily)

Drive X: - 3TB external USB hard drive for nightly image backups of drive C and D: (this drive is swapped with a second external drive I keep in my safe deposit box about once a month). I keep two backups of each drive on the external drive in case I need to recover a file I deleted before backing up.

Like you, when a drive fails (or I just want to upgrade to a larger drive) I can restore my backup image within minutes. I did this last month when I upgraded my D: drive from a HD to a larger SSD.
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Old 02-06-2019, 11:58 AM   #80
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My approach consists of 2 internal drives and an external using a swap drive.

1) 1TB internal SSHD: C Drive contains the Windows system and my data folder

2) 1TB internal HDD:

F partition (~800GB): Macrium Reflect backups - system and my data folder incrementally backed up each morning. System backups 30 days worth with the oldest backup rolling off after 30
days.

E partition (~200GB): non-scheduled backup of my data folder. I manually sync (using FreeFileSync program) when feels right. Usually a few times a week. If needed, can easily sync back from E data folder to C drive data folder.

3) External - backup of data folder annually, probably should do more often but I'm lazy and take my chances as I think a hit on both internal drives is unlikely .

As part of my data folder I have encrypted volumes with Veracrypt.
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