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Old 10-07-2013, 04:04 PM   #41
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I've been trying to convince DW to get rid of her old typewriter from college for years. She's usually the one who wants to de-clutter, but she just can't make herself pitch the old dinosaur. By that I mean the typewriter, not me.

I don't send much via snail mail any more but just last night I hand-addressed a non-personal envelope. All-caps, which I usually use at my engineering job; like others, this is partially to ensure the young drafters CAD operators BIM (Building Information Modeling) techs can read what I'm writing. But as far as using the printer for a single envelope, if I'm mailing in a form filled in by hand it's just too much trouble to fire up the PC and print it. In fact, now that I've had my iPad for over a year I don't use the PC for much more than Quicken, gaming, and printing.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:05 PM   #42
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My handwriting looks like a ransom note. So on those rare times I use a printer.
The only things I handwrite beyond just a signature are sympathy notes and I can imagine the bereaved thinking I must have had a small stroke.

Penmanship is based on muscle memory for me and not having used it for a while, it's long gone.

On the other hand I'm not even keyboarding this, I'm dictating it into my iPad's microphone and editing for punctuation...
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Old 10-07-2013, 05:57 PM   #43
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I understand the urge to get modern and look very cool with electronics -- PC, Mac, tablets, smartphones, etc. But I'm a bit worried when some people so lightly dismiss penmanship and the artsy side of lettering. Somehow the arts are getting a bad rap.

I'm not talking about any particular person's response, just in general.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:09 PM   #44
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I understand the urge to get modern and look very cool with electronics -- PC, Mac, tablets, smartphones, etc. But I'm a bit worried when some people so lightly dismiss penmanship and the artsy side of lettering. Somehow the arts are getting a bad rap. I'm not talking about any particular person's response, just in general.
I know what you are saying. I never had legible penmanship so for me it is a practical matter to use machines for all of my writing, but I am more than balanced by artistic DH who although lefthanded does flawless calligraphy and can outdo the fanciest electronic fonts in creating logos.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:22 PM   #45
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Somehow the arts are getting a bad rap.
I agree, and this from a guy who never progressed past drawing stick figures but could rebuild a carburetor at age 14. I sense somehow that it has a lot to do with creativity and I never worked at that.

But I renewed an interest in photography a couple of years ago and it is somewhat frustrating because the tech stuff comes easy for me - the relationship with ISO, shutter speeds and aperture, depth of field, Lightroom, Photoshop and so on. But the ability to "see" a good image before it's taken is extremely difficult for me.

How do people do that?

Right now I'm struggling with Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:50 PM   #46
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Much of art, like anything else worth doing, is learning the proven, general principles and good technique--and then practice, practice, practice. There are accepted (and uncomplicated) principles for making a balanced, pleasing photograph, and these are laid out in books on photography which you can borrow from any library. If you learn and practice those principles, you will become a good photographer.

Oh, and the good thing about learning to photograph today? You can take, view, and discard 99% of 1,000 images, without worrying about huge expenses in film and development. Yes I said 1,000 images. You need to take at least that many before you develop a real sense of a good photo.

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I agree, and this from a guy who never progressed past drawing stick figures but could rebuild a carburetor at age 14. I sense somehow that it has a lot to do with creativity and I never worked at that.

But I renewed an interest in photography a couple of years ago and it is somewhat frustrating because the tech stuff comes easy for me - the relationship with ISO, shutter speeds and aperture, depth of field, Lightroom, Photoshop and so on. But the ability to "see" a good image before it's taken is extremely difficult for me.

How do people do that?

Right now I'm struggling with Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.
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Old 10-07-2013, 07:13 PM   #47
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I agree, and this from a guy who never progressed past drawing stick figures but could rebuild a carburetor at age 14. I sense somehow that it has a lot to do with creativity and I never worked at that.

But I renewed an interest in photography a couple of years ago and it is somewhat frustrating because the tech stuff comes easy for me - the relationship with ISO, shutter speeds and aperture, depth of field, Lightroom, Photoshop and so on. But the ability to "see" a good image before it's taken is extremely difficult for me.

How do people do that?

Right now I'm struggling with Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.
That drawing book is an excellent resource. I learned a lot from that. Drawing takes a lot of patience and many feel defeated because it is just tough to get to the level of proficiency we want to. The book shows some of Van Gogh's early work and it was pretty poor. He learned by doing.

I've spent many hours outdoors painting, and getting the values (lights and darks) right is so important. More important then color. Drawing is a critical foundation too in that regard.

Photography can be artistic and I think that many go to black and white for the same reason that values are so critical in outdoor (plein air) painting. It's incredibly easy to click away without seeing the image and hoping to crop it, or fix it later. In painting you hope to do one image in maybe 2 hours. Cropping is not possible (well maybe in watercolor) so you have the composition to get through first.

Just some artsy thoughts and perhaps a bit OT. But I do think that the arts (literature, music, painting, etc) are getting pushed too far into the background as people get engrossed with practical endeavors.
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Old 10-07-2013, 11:46 PM   #48
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My handwriting looks like a ransom note. So on those rare times I use a printer.
Woody Allen's character, Virgil, had a similar problem at the bank when he took his hand-written note to a teller:

"Please put $50,000 into this bag, and apt natural. I'm pointing a gub at you"
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Old 10-08-2013, 09:18 AM   #49
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I think my sister borrowed my typewriter 20-25 yrs ago and I never got it back nor missed it.

For envelopes I print in caps as legibly as I can, to make it easier for the USPS to read.

Cards are about the only thing I hand write, or the occasional form which usually asks you to print. And I rarely do cards.

If I'm going to write a letter, I'll type it in and print it. Mostly I just do emails. Some may lament the demise of the letter, but email is faster, cheaper, easier, and may be more reliable (lost mail vs. spam folders). Nobody seems to miss the telegraph anymore.

Signatures are the only thing I'll do in cursive. I guess I write the dollar amount on checks in cursive too, for some reason. It just doesn't come naturally to me anymore. I hear that cursive is going away in schools, and I wonder what that means for signatures?

I used to make lists for myself and still do at times, but more and more I use evernote, shared on my laptop and phone.

The less I write by hand, the worse my handwriting gets. And it was never very good to begin with. My brother had a theory that people with quick minds have the worst writing, because they are in a hurry to get their thoughts down.

I run a lot of races, and most have online signup. There is still one local guy who has paper forms. I printed my name as carefully as I could, but his secretary got it wrong when I saw it at race day check-in. I had it corrected, and he came back to me later, blaming me for it not being very legible. I felt like snapping at him to join the 21st century, but he's pretty much a legend in these circles so it wouldn't have gone well.
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Old 10-08-2013, 10:38 AM   #50
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Signatures are the only thing I'll do in cursive. I guess I write the dollar amount on checks in cursive too, for some reason. It just doesn't come naturally to me anymore. I hear that cursive is going away in schools, and I wonder what that means for signatures?
My signaure is the only thing I wrote in script any more, and it has been that way since I was in high school (maybe Jr. High) when teachers stopped requiring it. My script was always terrible. I have a short name (first and last) so I'd have lots of trouble writing script which included any of the letters not in my signature LOL...
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Old 10-08-2013, 11:10 AM   #51
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I hear that cursive is going away in schools, and I wonder what that means for signatures?
It has always seemed to me that signatures were more scribble than script anyway
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Old 10-08-2013, 02:02 PM   #52
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On the other hand I'm not even keyboarding this, I'm dictating it into my iPad's microphone and editing for punctuation...
Yes as long as you refrain from calling your iPad "Sally the stenographer"! I do it too on my smartphone. I just hate editing it though.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:09 PM   #53
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I hear that cursive is going away in schools, and I wonder what that means for signatures?
Our district still teaches cursive in 3rd, 4th and 5th.

It as important for my sons to learn to READ cursive since their piano teacher writes their weekly practice assignments in cursive. I would imagine most kids have older relatives that send birthday cards with cursive notes.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:12 PM   #54
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I've heard that here in MI they've started teaching cursive again, after a lapse of 15+ years.

During the "lapse" period, a sister of a friend of mine tried teaching it in her elementary school class and she was reprimanded, as it wasn't part of the approved coursework.

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