Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Question for all those at home DIY plumbers
Old 12-07-2011, 01:09 PM   #1
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,467
Question for all those at home DIY plumbers

The ejector pit in the basement is sealed with a lid, and some type of rubber or latex sealant around the holes where the pipes come through. The sealant around one of the pipes is broken, all dried up and has fallen off. I went to home depot to find some replacement and they only a new lid kit. They could offer no option just to seal the small area where the pipe runs through the lid.

Anyone here have any suggestions?
__________________

__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-07-2011, 01:35 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
I'd suggest a silicone caulking material.
__________________

__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 01:39 PM   #3
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,611
Yep, a tube of silicone caulk should fix you up nicely.
__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 01:51 PM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,862
We never had a basement, but an ejector pit sounds cool.
__________________
Animorph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 01:52 PM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
They could offer no option just to seal the small area where the pipe runs through the lid.

Anyone here have any suggestions?
How big is this gap you're trying to fill? If the hole is 3" and you have 1" pipe, the use of silicone sealant alone might work, but you'd obviously need to support it from the back side so the sealant can set up (some duct tape put back there would work).
It might make a more substantial repair if you could slip a boot or reducer over your pipe and then seal that reducer to the lid using silicone. Again, depending on the pipe size you might find a good candidate in the rubber/galvanized boots used to flash vent pipes that come through a roof, or you might be able to use a PVC reducer.

I spend a lot of time cruising the aisles of Lowe's looking for little bits that can be made to work for projects like this.

Two notes:
- Obviously, make it possible to take all this apart and get to the sump pit again when needed. Paste wax or wax paper can be a good way of keeping the caulk/sealant from sticking where you don't want it.
- If you've got radon in your area and if the sump pit is within the air envelope of your house, sealing it is very important. This is a prime way that soil gasses find their way into houses.

Good luck.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 02:10 PM   #6
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,467
HFWR and Breumeister, thanks for the quick responses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
How big is this gap you're trying to fill? If the hole is 3" and you have 1" pipe, the use of silicone sealant alone might work, but you'd obviously need to support it from the back side so the sealant can set up (some duct tape put back there would work).
It might make a more substantial repair if you could slip a boot or reducer over your pipe and then seal that reducer to the lid using silicone. Again, depending on the pipe size you might find a good candidate in the rubber/galvanized boots used to flash vent pipes that come through a roof, or you might be able to use a PVC reducer.

I spend a lot of time cruising the aisles of Lowe's looking for little bits that can be made to work for projects like this.

Two notes:
- Obviously, make it possible to take all this apart and get to the sump pit again when needed. Paste wax or wax paper can be a good way of keeping the caulk/sealant from sticking where you don't want it.
- If you've got radon in your area and if the sump pit is within the air envelope of your house, sealing it is very important. This is a prime way that soil gasses find their way into houses.

Good luck.
This is an ejector pit little used, put in when the basement was finished. It is approx. a 2 1/2 inch pipe and a 3 inch hole. I don't think there's room for a boot. Wax first makes sense so the silicone doesn't stick to the pipe. Think I'll head over to Lowes tomorrow and see how they can help.

How is the silicone applied? How do I keep it from falling into the pit?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Animorph View Post
We never had a basement, but an ejector pit sounds cool.
When you find out what it is ejecting, it gets gross pretty quick. Think - sewer, pit, bathroom, and ejector. You get the idea - that also explains why keeping it sealed is important.
__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 02:12 PM   #7
Full time employment: Posting here.
sailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Atlanta suburbs
Posts: 881
As a victim of two ejector pump switch failures earlier this year and being a designated plumber in the household I concur - use silicone caulk.
If you need to support it from the bottom - can you find a rubber boot or an o-ring and slip it on the pipe? You might need to cut the boot or o-ring
if you need to put it on a pump outlet pipe (vs. the vent pipe)

I think I opened my sump pit six or seven times in recent few months, every time cursing the DPO (in sail-speak Dreaded Previous Owner) who commissioned such a hare-brained setup He could have the s..t flowing down using gravity, but no, and not even one, but two ejector pumps were added
Now too costly to remedy - although if the pump or switch keeps failing I might consider digging under the foundations and connecting to the other sewer line on the property.
__________________
sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 02:14 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 4,792
Sikaflex or gutter seal. Either one sticks to nearly everything.
__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 02:44 PM   #9
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,284
My ejector pit lid looks to have some kind of rubber gasket for each 2" in/out pipe held in place by a ring with tabs that screw down to the lid. Looks like if you loosen the screws, the gasket would release so it could all come apart pretty easily.

Something like that would be much better than silicone. If that silicone sticks and mushrooms out to the inside, getting it all apart could be a big job.

No, I'm not going to take imine apart to see

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 03:40 PM   #10
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
If the gap is large, you might try to roll up some plumber's putty into a "snake", then cram place that in the gap...
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 04:05 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,611
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
It is approx. a 2 1/2 inch pipe and a 3 inch hole.

How is the silicone applied? How do I keep it from falling into the pit?
From your description, you have a 1/4 inch gap to fill between the pipe and the hole. Even if it's not even all around, no problem. Open the tube of silicone caulk (get the good stuff, basically the kind that goes for over $3 a tube), put it in a caulking gun, and squeeze out a healthy sized bead all around the pipe.

Then take your thumb and smooth it down all around. It won't fall in. Wash it off your thumb with soap and water (it comes off easily). You're done. Put a cap on the tube, release the pressure on the gun, and put it away for another use.
__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 04:35 PM   #12
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFWR View Post
If the gap is large, you might try to roll up some plumber's putty into a "snake", then cram place that in the gap...
This is a good idea. The plumber's putty comes in a little tub, works like Pla-Do, and will never harden up so you should be able to get everything apart again in the future without much swearing.

The silicone will work, too. This isn't much of a gap, but you still might need to wad up a something to put into the space to keep the silicone from sagging down while it sets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by braumeister View Post
Put a cap on the tube, release the pressure on the gun, and put it away for another use.
Then, when you need it again in six months and all the hardware stores are closed, it will be as hard as a stone. At least that's my experience. I've tried all kinds of things--the supplied cap, golf tees, aluminum tape, etc and haven't had much success. The aluminum tape seems to be the closest thing to effective for me.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 06:54 PM   #13
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,355
Dont go to home depot for something like this. Go to a plumbing supplier and get the proper gasket. Caulk won't work. Plumbers putty won't work. If caulk or putty worked, them it probably would have been sealed with caulk or putty originally.
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 07:01 AM   #14
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,467
When the lid is sealed and the pump cycles on it draws in some air - I would be concerned that it might suck in the plumbers putty. The silicone option sounds safer. Once it sets it would need to be broken, and that might be a PITA, but that should be years from now. The lid only should be removed if the pump fails, and then breaking the seal and damaging the lid of the pipe would not be an issue.

Ronstar, I cannot find the gasket anywhere. Even if I could, to install I would need to remove the lid, disconnect the pipe, run the gasket over the pipe, reconnect it, then rebolt the lid. This is beyond my limited reach into home plumbing. Just because silicone isn't used doesn't mean it won't work.
__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 07:07 AM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
ratto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 225
It sounds like the ejector pit is not internally pressurized. The OD of a 2-1/2 inch PVC pipe is about 2.875". The gap between it and the surrounding 3" hole is small enough to be filled in with silicone caulk. I agree with Braumeister said, get a good caulk, like the GE 100% silicone one, since it stays flexible after cures. I would probably try:
  1. cut a rectangle cardboard large enough to have a hole with ID about 2.875" in the middle.
  2. Splice the cardboard and put a small dab of caulk at each corner, slide it into the ejector PVC pipe, with small dabs of caulk facing the underneath of ejector pit lid, press the cardboard evenly and firmly against the lid (make sure PVC pipe is centered in the 3" hole). Let it settle for about 24 hrs. The cardboard serves as a base holding more caulk later on.
  3. Now apply more caulk to fully fill the void between the PVC pipe and 3" surrounding hole in the ejector pit lid. For cosmetic reason, a spade or similar shape tool can be used to make the caulk flush with the upper side of lid. Let the caulk cure and settle.
  4. Peel off the cardboard from the underneath of lid, and put everything back together. You're done!
Total cost should be just a few dollars.
__________________
ratto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 07:58 AM   #16
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratto View Post
It sounds like the ejector pit is not internally pressurized. The OD of a 2-1/2 inch PVC pipe is about 2.875". The gap between it and the surrounding 3" hole is small enough to be filled in with silicone caulk. I agree with Braumeister said, get a good caulk, like the GE 100% silicone one, since it stays flexible after cures. I would probably try:
  1. cut a rectangle cardboard large enough to have a hole with ID about 2.875" in the middle.
  2. Splice the cardboard and put a small dab of caulk at each corner, slide it into the ejector PVC pipe, with small dabs of caulk facing the underneath of ejector pit lid, press the cardboard evenly and firmly against the lid (make sure PVC pipe is centered in the 3" hole). Let it settle for about 24 hrs. The cardboard serves as a base holding more caulk later on.
  3. Now apply more caulk to fully fill the void between the PVC pipe and 3" surrounding hole in the ejector pit lid. For cosmetic reason, a spade or similar shape tool can be used to make the caulk flush with the upper side of lid. Let the caulk cure and settle.
  4. Peel off the cardboard from the underneath of lid, and put everything back together. You're done!
Total cost should be just a few dollars.
Thanks for the suggestion. I can't get under the lid. That is, the seal above the lid goes on after the lid is bolted into place. What I need is to lay a thick line of silicone, not force it in but let it lay on top, just make sure it completely covers the space.
__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 08:08 AM   #17
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,896
I'd buy a Fernco type coupler, split it and attach it to the pipe with a hose clamp. A little sealer on the bottom edge and split would seal it nicely.

fernco, fernco couplings, fernco coupling, flexible pipe connectors, fernco fitting, flexible couplings | Fernco

Available at the big box stores or a plumbing supply.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Longevity and Quality...
Old 12-08-2011, 08:20 AM   #18
Recycles dryer sheets
REattempt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 280
Longevity and Quality...

Please think carefully about using any type of caulk or sealant.

Please find and use the appropriate gasket. You can see the gasket here:

Sewage Ejector pumps and up-flush toilets, purchase from Terry Love's E-store

and here

http://www.hancor.com/pdf/SewageEjector.pdf

Using the appropriate parts for your system will extend the longevity and you will feel proud of the quality of your work.

You want a grommet like the last one on this page:

http://www.electriduct.com/Large-Rubber-Grommets.html

Since you don't have access under the lid, you will have to slit the seal so it breaks the circle, and install it from the top. There will be a groove and it will go in nice (with a little work). The slit will seal itself nicely.

See if you can find the manufacturer of the ejector and/or ejector well, or alternatively call a local ejector installer/repairman (plumber) and they will find the right gasket for you. If you can't find it, you can probably order the one above on electriduct.

Your system will work as designed! Good Luck.
__________________
FIREd at 46, 8/31/11
REattempt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 08:40 AM   #19
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,284
Quote:
Originally Posted by REattempt View Post
Please think carefully about using any type of caulk or sealant.

Please find and use the appropriate gasket. You can see the gasket here:

Sewage Ejector pumps and up-flush toilets, purchase from Terry Love's E-store

and here

http://www.hancor.com/pdf/SewageEjector.pdf

Using the appropriate parts for your system will extend the longevity and you will feel proud of the quality of your work.

Travelover had the right supplier, but the wrong part. You are looking for a gasket that LOOKS like this: (yours will be smaller and flatter).

Fernco Flexible Donuts, fernco, fernco donut, fernco donuts, Sewer Pipe Compression Joint Donut Seal, Donut Shaped Compression Seal, Sewer Pipe Joint Seal, Pipe Compression Seal, Plumbing Donut Seals | Fernco

See if you can find the manufacturer of the ejector and/or ejector well, or alternatively call a local ejector installer/repairman (plumber) and they will find the right gasket for you.

Your system will work as designed!
True, but I think the parts that travelover mentioned are more readily available. His approach is exactly what I was thinking after I read some of the other ideas.

It allows for easy removal, and the coupler will fill the gap - only a little caulk/sealer will be needed. Next best thing (and probably good enough).

-ERD50



Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
I'd buy a Fernco type coupler, split it and attach it to the pipe with a hose clamp. A little sealer on the bottom edge and split would seal it nicely.

fernco, fernco couplings, fernco coupling, flexible pipe connectors, fernco fitting, flexible couplings | Fernco

Available at the big box stores or a plumbing supply.
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 10:11 AM   #20
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Or how about a hack that's the best of both worlds?

Get a grommet to fit, then snip it on one side. Slip it around the pipe, and snap it into place in the opening. Pookie with silicone.

No need to take the whole thing apart. Unless, of course, your friends have a propensity to inspect your basement plumbing for aesthetics...
__________________

__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Final Stages of 2nd home purchase-Need Input sheehs1 FIRE and Money 46 03-03-2012 09:43 AM
Asset management for nursing home care Sue J FIRE and Money 16 12-07-2011 07:16 AM
Reno's that increase home value?? My Dream Other topics 22 10-20-2011 08:04 PM
Hi I'm an Acupuncturist (53 yo) Should i buy a rental vacation home? daibai Hi, I am... 10 07-10-2011 11:52 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:08 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.