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Question - Informing your employer you are resigning
Old 02-07-2015, 02:01 AM   #1
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Question - Informing your employer you are resigning

I am not there yet, but I would probably consider giving my employer a few months notice if I were to resign, and I have seen many of you have done that.

Did any of you get terminated before your said date? (Laid off would be nice, but I mean terminated without severance?)
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Old 02-07-2015, 06:31 AM   #2
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You have to be very careful about this. Giving too much notice can hurt your bonus / promotion possibilities. I mentioned I was looking to retire within the next year. I did not give a date since I was hoping for a package. In other words, put me on the list. Eventually I was terminated with a package, to my surprise. I am glad I did not leave on my own. I would have lost the package and unemployment.
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Old 02-07-2015, 06:45 AM   #3
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I was a bit paranoid so I waited until our bonus and stock grants vested. Since our business is in good shape, I didn't think there was any chance of a package so that wasn't a consideration for me. What it has meant is I am working a couple months longer than I wanted but the alternative was to resign sooner and risk being terminated before vesting date and I didn't want to take that chance.
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Old 02-07-2015, 07:12 AM   #4
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I would follow your companys HR policy for separation. It should specify how much notice is required. I wanted a package but everytime they had a "reduction", engineers were always put in a group that was not eligible because they were "too valuable of an asset". We just had to quit to leave.
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Old 02-07-2015, 07:23 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by tmm99 View Post
I am not there yet, but I would probably consider giving my employer a few months notice if I were to resign, and I have seen many of you have done that.

Did any of you get terminated before your said date? (Laid off would be nice, but I mean terminated without severance?)
I gave 3 months notice and was not termed or laid off. But after almost 20 years with the company I pretty much knew how the company would "behave." I would have only given two weeks notice after my desired date if I thought they would term me.

I'm not sure what others experience has been will be instructive, every company culture and individuals involved are different. Your question seems antithetical - why would give several months notice if you really think early termination is a possible outcome?
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Old 02-07-2015, 08:19 AM   #6
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Mine was a really odd case... short answer is no.
I would be really careful unless you know what your worth is to them.
I know people who gave 2 weeks notice and were shown the door the same day. It really depends on your company and their perceived value for you.

Mine company is still trying to talk me out of it. 3 weeks left. I work remote (I'm in midwest and they are east coast). They are setting up a retirement party for me. BTW I told them in November.
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Old 02-07-2015, 09:19 AM   #7
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I informally signaled my intent to retire a few months before I left and we worked out a date that was mutually agreeable. I never did provide a formal resignation letter as I recall but HR and my partner and I just agreed to a date.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:46 AM   #8
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I gave two months but I was a supervisor at another firm where you were out the door once you gave notice. Just see what the culture is where you are employed.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:54 AM   #9
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I gave about 2 weeks. Definitely, after all my I's were dotted and T's crossed and ready to go.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:57 AM   #10
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I would follow your companys HR policy for separation. It should specify how much notice is required. I wanted a package but everytime they had a "reduction", engineers were always put in a group that was not eligible because they were "too valuable of an asset". We just had to quit to leave.
Megacorp's policy was two weeks, I gave 2 1/2, worked perfectly. I watched a dear 70+ yo woman get screwed out of year end contibutions. She gave to much notice.

As someone else said some places policy is to walk you out the door. Nothing personal, just policy.

Where I was it didn't happen too often, I sent one home with pay only because her existence hurt 50 other people daily. My position gave me access to so much data I wouldn't have been surprised to be walked out. Instead I got to pass on some knowledge about how things worked.
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Old 02-07-2015, 01:19 PM   #11
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Two weeks notice is customary. Rather than communicating your intent well in advance start 'building bench', prepare co-workers to assume your responsibilities. There may be whiners but you can remind them that this could prepare them for eventual promotion. If they probe the comment you can remind them that a quality operation always develops succession plans and you want them to be on their short list.
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Old 02-07-2015, 06:21 PM   #12
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....As someone else said some places policy is to walk you out the door. Nothing personal, just policy....
In the places that I worked it walking out the door if one resigned was rare... only if the employee was joining a competitor (but then not always) or where there was already an existing adversarial relationship between the firm/management and the resigning employee.
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Old 02-07-2015, 06:26 PM   #13
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I agree that it depends on how you expect the employer to react and any other circumstances that might be a factor such as bonuses, etc.

In my own case, my employer was a relatively large company in a fairly specialized field. I reported directly to the CEO for North American operations. I knew I was not indispensible, no one ever is but I also knew they were not likely to find a replacement within 2 weeks either. So I waited till after my annual lunch with the boss and receiving my bonus cheque before telling him that I planned to retire in a year. He asked if I was kidding and I said I was quite serious.

At the end of that year when we had lunch and I got my bonus cheque, I told him I was ready to go and asked him how much notice he wanted me to give. I expected something like 3 months. Instead he said he hadn't taken me seriously and asked me for a year's notice from then. I said I'd have to consider what to do.

I did some math at home and went back and told him I would agree to 3 months notice or quit that day and agree to sign a consulting contract for one year. During that year, I would work an average of 3 days per week with the days to be of my choice but with no gap longer than 2 weeks. As my earning were commission based on sales, I would sign a contract equal to the amount of my last year's earnings plus bonus as well as all other costs paid by the company. ie. company car, all benefits they paid for etc. That basically totalled twice my last year's income. He went for the year of consulting. So you could say my initial retirement lasted 1 day, then I became self-employed for a year working an average of 3 days per week for the equivalent of 10 days pay. Worked for me.

On another note though one thing I would advise anyone to do is not burn their bridges behind them. It's always a good idea to leave with them wishing you well. A good example of that was one of my 2 sons who after about 15 years with one company in the financial sector, was head hunted and given an offer he couldn't refuse. He talked to me about it and my only advice was, to say he was prepared to give them whatever notice they wanted and was leaving not because he was unhappy with the company or the money but only because it was not only a great offer, he also felt it was time for a change. I also advised him that if they offered to match the offer he had been given, that he had to say no. Otherwise they would never know if he had held a gun to their head and that would cause resentment.

He worked the month's notice they asked for and then took the new job and within 3 months of doing so, discovered that what he had been told and what the position actually was, were not the same thing. He called his old boss and told him things were not working out and he was hoping to network with people he knew in the industry and move on. He got a call the next day from the VP of another department in his old company who offered him a position that was also a promotion from the job he had left. Gave the new employer 2 weeks notice and left. He wasn't worried about burning that bridge.

The point being, even an early retiree might discover they got it wrong and need to go back. So don't burn bridges if you don't have to.
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Old 02-07-2015, 07:23 PM   #14
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Thank you very much for all the replies. I will need to think about it some more when it's time, but for now, I think I will go with a standard two week notice while hoping to get laid off before then....
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Old 02-07-2015, 07:28 PM   #15
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I am not there yet, but I would probably consider giving my employer a few months notice if I were to resign, and I have seen many of you have done that.

Did any of you get terminated before your said date? (Laid off would be nice, but I mean terminated without severance?)

If you are just looking out for #1 than 2 weeks is probably ok. It is certainly the safest course of action. It may piss people off a bit but hey you are retiring and not your problem. That said....

If you have some company loyalty and like most of your co workers/boss I think a couple of months feels like the right thing to do. If your company is doing RIFF than 6+ month is perfectly fine on the chance that you can get offered a package.

I hinted that I was going to go 5 months before I did. (No RIFF were going on at the time. ) I formally requested a 1 year LOA 2+ months before I left.

I'd think the chances of you getting terminated without severance, are minimal. Unless the company is almost failing they virtually always offer severance packages. Most medium and large firms have pretty strict policy about firing, and if your performance has been good, simply letting people know you are retiring in a few months, shouldn't change anything.

If you are over the age of 40 you are a member of a protected class,and company risk lawsuits if they fire you without cause. If you give them 2 months notice and they walk you out door, if the 2 months pay made a difference in your retirement finance I'd say you were cutting things to close.

The one big exception to all this would be large end of year bonuses/stock option or pension vesting. If you worked for a rather ruthless company and giving them 2 months notice would put you in jeopardy of losing a substantial bonus, then I'd wait.
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