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Old 07-30-2008, 09:14 PM   #21
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I could probably do this for an entire week's worth of meals in the Hawaiian & Asian aisles at our local supermarkets.

Our lychee are ripening nicely...
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:26 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
BTW, who uses margarine anymore? I thought that was debunked years ago?

Butter, or olive oil.

-ERD50
Thought what was debunked years ago?

If you're lactose intolerant or have IBS and milk fat is one of your trigger foods than butter won't cut it and olive oil on toast with jam is just weird.
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:30 PM   #23
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Our lychee are ripening nicely...
No Fair! Al wanted products, not ingredients. But, since you started, I'll post a recent discovery (for me). Purslane...

Portulaca oleracea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




It is a weed, and it is really good in a salad, or by itself. HAve not tried cooking it yet. DW won't eat it. Even though I showed her there were dozens of upscale restaurants featuring it. Maybe if they offer it at the fancy French place we go to once in a blue moon...

Quote:
Although purslane is considered a weed in the United States, it can be eaten as a leaf vegetable. It has a slightly sour and salty taste and is eaten throughout much of Europe and Asia.[2] It can be used fresh as a salad, or cooked like spinach, and because of its mucilaginous quality it is also suitable for soups and stews. Australian Aborigines used to use the seeds to make seedcakes.
Purslane contains more Omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic acid in particular[2]) than any other leafy vegetable plant. Simopoulos states that Purslane has .01 mg/g of EPA. This is an extraordinary amount of EPA for land based vegetable sources. EPA is an Omega-3 fatty acid normally found mostly in fish and some algae. [3] It also contains vitamins (mainly vitamin C, and some vitamin B and carotenoids), as well as dietary minerals, such as magnesium, calcium, potassium and iron. Also present are two types of betalain alkaloid pigments, the reddish betacyanins (visible in the coloration of the stems) and the yellow betaxanthins (noticeable in the flowers and in the slight yellowish cast of the leaves). Both of these pigment types are potent antioxidants and have been found to have antimutagenic properties in laboratory studies.[4]
-ERD50
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:32 PM   #24
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Thought what was debunked years ago?

If you're lactose intolerant or have IBS and milk fat is one of your trigger foods than butter won't cut it and olive oil on toast with jam is just weird.
Ah, wasn't thinking about the lactose intolerant crowd. Makes sense.

Hmmm, come to think of it, T-AL does have problems when it comes to milk....

-ERD50

PS/edit - sorry, didn't answer your question. Debunked that margarine was 'better for you' than butter (assuming no lactose issues).
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:57 PM   #25
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PS/edit - sorry, didn't answer your question. Debunked that margarine was 'better for you' than butter (assuming no lactose issues).
you know, I would have thought that too... but my mom helps with a weight loss competition at the Y and the nutritionist was teaching people to eat healthy by doing things like substituting margarine for butter.

Of course, mom and I agree that butter is likely better for you. Plus, a little bit of butter goes much further in flavoring a dish. Seriously, a sliver of butter and some pepper and you're good to go.
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Old 07-31-2008, 12:59 AM   #26
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Soft pickled lemons:



It sounds awful but preserved lemons are a key ingredient in many delightful Moroccan recipes.

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Old 07-31-2008, 01:00 AM   #27
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a recent discovery (for me). Purslane...
That took over one of my potted geraniums.. I didn't know it was edible.
I'm kinda afraid to try it.
It looks too 'succulent'.. like it would taste like aloe or something.

ew.. yeah, I see your clipping says "mucilaginous".
Maybe a soup would be a way to ease into it.
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Old 07-31-2008, 01:21 AM   #28
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It sounds awful but preserved lemons are a key ingredient in many delightful Moroccan recipes.
We've got a serious bucket full out in the garage fridge that I laid in earlier this year when our lemon trees finally gave up their last batch.

To make, cut lemons into slices or chunks and layer into a storage container with a tight fitting lid, coating and layering the lemon pieces with kosher salt. Basically you cant have too much salt. When you're done, pour lemon juice over the whole shebang until the lemons are well covered. Cover and refrigerate. Sloosh it around every day or two for about 2-3 weeks. Then pour an inch of olive oil over the top.

The preserved lemons will last for about 3-4 months on their own, but you double it by 'sealing' the concoction with the olive oil.

The rinds and pith will soften over the initial 3 weeks to a (better than it sounds) soft gelatinous state and the whole lemon is completely edible. You may use the lemony-salty olive oil topping wherever you'd like a lemony-salty olive oil (think chicken skin before roasting?), you can use the salty lemon juice on chicen or fish, and the lemons once rinsed thoroughly can be used anywhere you use a lemon...pureed in a dressing, in a salad, in a tagine, etc. I have a recipe in the early retirement cookbook for a chicken/green olive/preserved lemon tagine that is one of my wifes favorite dishes.

I've never tried it, but I see no reason why you couldnt try limes or grapefruit in the same preservation scheme.
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Old 07-31-2008, 05:35 AM   #29
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We like these wholegrain Rye crispy snackbreads. As you can guess from the name, they're made in Finland.

We like to top them with a little homemade tuna salad, tomatoes and cucumber slices for a healthy lite lunch.

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Old 07-31-2008, 06:57 AM   #30
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We've got a serious bucket full out in the garage fridge that I laid in earlier this year when our lemon trees finally gave up their last batch.

To make, cut lemons into slices or chunks and layer into a storage container with a tight fitting lid, coating and layering the lemon pieces with kosher salt. Basically you cant have too much salt. When you're done, pour lemon juice over the whole shebang until the lemons are well covered. Cover and refrigerate. Sloosh it around every day or two for about 2-3 weeks. Then pour an inch of olive oil over the top.

The preserved lemons will last for about 3-4 months on their own, but you double it by 'sealing' the concoction with the olive oil.

The rinds and pith will soften over the initial 3 weeks to a (better than it sounds) soft gelatinous state and the whole lemon is completely edible. You may use the lemony-salty olive oil topping wherever you'd like a lemony-salty olive oil (think chicken skin before roasting?), you can use the salty lemon juice on chicen or fish, and the lemons once rinsed thoroughly can be used anywhere you use a lemon...pureed in a dressing, in a salad, in a tagine, etc. I have a recipe in the early retirement cookbook for a chicken/green olive/preserved lemon tagine that is one of my wifes favorite dishes.

I've never tried it, but I see no reason why you couldnt try limes or grapefruit in the same preservation scheme.
Do these taste like the pickled lemons you would find at an Indian restaurant? Is there any residual salty taste?
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Old 07-31-2008, 07:46 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
No Fair! Al wanted products, not ingredients. But, since you started, I'll post a recent discovery (for me). Purslane...

Portulaca oleracea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




It is a weed, and it is really good in a salad, or by itself. HAve not tried cooking it yet. DW won't eat it. Even though I showed her there were dozens of upscale restaurants featuring it. Maybe if they offer it at the fancy French place we go to once in a blue moon...


-ERD50
I've been harvesting some from the back yard and putting it in salads. Tasty.
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Old 07-31-2008, 08:16 AM   #32
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That took over one of my potted geraniums.. I didn't know it was edible.
I'm kinda afraid to try it.
It looks too 'succulent'.. like it would taste like aloe or something.

ew.. yeah, I see your clipping says "mucilaginous".
Maybe a soup would be a way to ease into it.
Really nothing to be afraid of. I think the 'mucilaginous' is if you cook them. A bit like the way okra will give up a bit of that 'slime'.

I have not cooked any yet, and have not noticed that when raw. Nice and crisp raw. Flavorful, but nothing 'out there', just adds a nice spiciness/complexity to a salad, and good on their own. Maybe the larger stems would be more of an issue, I don't know, I trim down to the smaller little branches.

c'mon now, you have to try it and report back. Maybe DW will follow your lead!

-ERD50
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Old 07-31-2008, 08:20 AM   #33
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Best way to prep/eat okra is pickled. Another southern "delicacy" is pickled eggs, usually prepped in the left over pickling solution from pickled baloney bologna.
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Old 07-31-2008, 08:54 AM   #34
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Yep, I miss the new england dive bars that all had jars of pickled eggs and pigs feet under the counter...
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Old 07-31-2008, 08:57 AM   #35
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Crepes with Nutella and sliced banana. There you go.
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Old 07-31-2008, 09:16 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
No Fair! Al wanted products, not ingredients. But, since you started, I'll post a recent discovery (for me). Purslane...

Portulaca oleracea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




It is a weed, and it is really good in a salad, or by itself. HAve not tried cooking it yet. DW won't eat it. Even though I showed her there were dozens of upscale restaurants featuring it. Maybe if they offer it at the fancy French place we go to once in a blue moon...


-ERD50
Purslane is the ban of my existence in my gardens. But yes, it tastes fine. I am not so fond of it cooked, the texture isn't the best for cooking.

Amaranth (pigweed) is good too, a relative of spinach i believe. I also like lambsquarters.
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Old 07-31-2008, 09:35 AM   #37
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Purslane is the ban of my existence in my gardens. But yes, it tastes fine.
Of course now that I've taken a liking to it, I'm having trouble finding much of it in my garden!

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Amaranth (pigweed) is good too, a relative of spinach i believe. I also like lambsquarters.
I'll have to try those (heck DW already thinks I'm nuts). I know we have lambsquarters, but I'll check some sources - descriptions can vary from area to area.

My Dad was big on this stuff, dandelion greens, mustard greens (in those days they could be high in lead if picked from roadsides). I'm a bit more selective, but I do find this purslane to be interesting.

-ERD50
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Old 07-31-2008, 09:42 AM   #38
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Best way to prep/eat okra is pickled. Another southern "delicacy" is pickled eggs, usually prepped in the left over pickling solution from pickled baloney bologna.
An outrageous lie! The best way to eat okra is to slice it into lovely little coins and FRY it! Crunchy and fabulous and not on my diet. I'm grossed out by okra any other way.
My mom makes pickled eggs for my DH sometimes. He loves them.
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Old 07-31-2008, 10:30 AM   #39
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BTW, who uses margarine anymore? I thought that was debunked years ago?

Butter, or olive oil.
Right. We use ICBINBL (I can't believe it's not better (light)), but I couldn't figure a way to phrase it without being distracting, so I said "margarine."

And here's a tip: when you spread ICBINBL and jelly on toast, spread the jelly first! This way, the ICBINBL doesn't melt, and you get nice tasty globs for your tongue. Try it.

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Hmmm, come to think of it, T-AL does have problems when it comes to milk....
Speaking of that, and at the risk of getting this thread closed, we've switched to Costco fat-free milk, and it's been excellent. Ever gallon has tasted great.
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Old 07-31-2008, 11:24 AM   #40
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If I'm going to drink soda, it has to be this one:


Vernor's ginger ale is the best! If you're from Michigan, you know about this stuff. It seems to be spreading a bit, though. We can get it in the grocery stores in KY. Comes in diet, too.
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