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Recommendations for a gentle electric toothbrush, please
Old 02-18-2016, 12:27 AM   #1
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Recommendations for a gentle electric toothbrush, please

I'm in the market for an electric toothbrush, but I'd like one that is gentle or has a gentle setting. I have gum recession and was told by the dentist that I need to brush gently while still getting rid of the plaque. Anyone have one that they love?
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Old 02-18-2016, 04:57 AM   #2
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I like the simple Oral B models. The ones that plug into a wall charger as opposed to the ones that run on AA batteries. Thorough and gentle. You should change the heads every 2-3 months. As a dentist with over 38 years of practice, I have recommended them for years. I use one myself, and have for many years. They do a nice job, and they don't cost an arm and a leg. I like the ones with the small round head that oscillates back and forth.

They cost $20 at Wal-Mart. I would not buy one of the fancy expensive models. I've never been all that impressed with the "sonic" ones either. Work slowly and carefully (shouldn't take more than 2 minutes ) with this thing and you'll be fine.

Oral-B Vitality Floss Action Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush - Walmart.com
Still gotta floss though.
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Old 02-18-2016, 07:10 AM   #3
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Have you tried debriding? That is, gargling with a weak (1.5%) solution of hydrogen peroxide. Dentists nagged me for decades to brush and floss more frequently and gently. I got the impression they expected me to brush three to four hours a day.

I started debriding a couple years ago and my dentist visits since have been very brief and full of praise. The plaque and tartar are softened and easily scraped away with gentle brushing after just a few seconds gargling. I mentioned this to my dentist and ask why no one told me about this technique a long time ago. He seemed familiar with the topic, but showed no interest in proselytizing its benefits to other patients.

Can it be that he makes more money filling cavities and digging root canals than he does through inspections and cleanings? Say it ain't so.
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Old 02-18-2016, 08:36 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by HadEnuff View Post
I like the simple Oral B models. The ones that plug into a wall charger as opposed to the ones that run on AA batteries. Thorough and gentle. You should change the heads every 2-3 months. As a dentist with over 38 years of practice, I have recommended them for years. I use one myself, and have for many years. They do a nice job, and they don't cost an arm and a leg. I like the ones with the small round head that oscillates back and forth.

They cost $20 at Wal-Mart. I would not buy one of the fancy expensive models. I've never been all that impressed with the "sonic" ones either. Work slowly and carefully (shouldn't take more than 2 minutes ) with this thing and you'll be fine.

Oral-B Vitality Floss Action Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush - Walmart.com
Still gotta floss though.
That's the exact one I have! It's quite gentle. I chose it because it was the cheapest, but I'm delighted to see a dentist endorsing it.
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Old 02-18-2016, 08:49 AM   #5
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I like the simple Oral B models. The ones that plug into a wall charger as opposed to the ones that run on AA batteries.
I have this one and like it a lot. After about 7 years the batteries are starting to give out, I'mthinking of opening it up and trying to swap them out (it's not designed for that).

One note: I'll stick with the Oral-B replacement brushes from now on. I tried a set of store-brand generic brushes designed for this unit and the bristles are considerably stiffer.

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Still gotta floss though.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:13 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by cooch96 View Post
Have you tried debriding? That is, gargling with a weak (1.5%) solution of hydrogen peroxide. Dentists nagged me for decades to brush and floss more frequently and gently. I got the impression they expected me to brush three to four hours a day.

I started debriding a couple years ago and my dentist visits since have been very brief and full of praise. The plaque and tartar are softened and easily scraped away with gentle brushing after just a few seconds gargling. I mentioned this to my dentist and ask why no one told me about this technique a long time ago. He seemed familiar with the topic, but showed no interest in proselytizing its benefits to other patients.

Can it be that he makes more money filling cavities and digging root canals than he does through inspections and cleanings? Say it ain't so.
"Debridement" is the physical removal of soft (plaque), and hard calcified (tartar) deposits from the teeth. Rinsing with mouthwashes, including peroxide, will likely not harm you unless grossly overdone, and will likely benefit you. It will not "debride" your teeth of tartar, and not really do a very complete job of cleaning plaque.
I don't know why so many people are so dead set against taking the 2 minutes out their day to just do it properly with a good brush and flossing. Have you ever tried to get your car really clean just by spraying water on it? I find I can spray 'til the cows come home, but if I don't take a nice soft wet cloth to it, there will always be some of that grimy film still on the car.

As far as why your dentist did not want to engage you in a long conversation of the magic of your "debridement", he probably has found that he has better uses for his time than trying to engage in such a conversation with someone who is convinced he/she knows more about the profession than he does, and is convinced that any disagreement with this miracle cure is based upon greed, rather than evidence seen with his own eyes.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:22 AM   #7
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We have 3 of the Oral-Bs at our place and get heads at Costco when they go on sale. They have made a difference when it comes to cleaning time at the dentist. Wish I had had one when I was a sapling.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:49 AM   #8
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Another option would be using a Water Pik. That's what DW uses, and I was just at the dentist yesterday and was told to start using it too. It has pressure settings, and according to what I was told it works fabulously for getting debris out from under the gum lines in places where the floss just doesn't go. I picked up a couple of extra heads and am going to start sharing DW's, see how it goes. The dentist says once a day is all you need.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:51 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by HadEnuff View Post
"Debridement" is the physical removal of soft (plaque), and hard calcified (tartar) deposits from the teeth. Rinsing with mouthwashes, including peroxide, will likely not harm you unless grossly overdone, and will likely benefit you. It will not "debride" your teeth of tartar, and not really do a very complete job of cleaning plaque.
I don't know why so many people are so dead set against taking the 2 minutes out their day to just do it properly with a good brush and flossing. Have you ever tried to get your car really clean just by spraying water on it? I find I can spray 'til the cows come home, but if I don't take a nice soft wet cloth to it, there will always be some of that grimy film still on the car.

As far as why your dentist did not want to engage you in a long conversation of the magic of your "debridement", he probably has found that he has better uses for his time than trying to engage in such a conversation with someone who is convinced he/she knows more about the profession than he does, and is convinced that any disagreement with this miracle cure is based upon greed, rather than evidence seen with his own eyes.
+1
Debridement is not the same as gargling!
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:57 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by HadEnuff View Post
I don't know why so many people are so dead set against taking the 2 minutes out their day to just do it properly with a good brush and flossing. Have you ever tried to get your car really clean just by spraying water on it? I find I can spray 'til the cows come home, but if I don't take a nice soft wet cloth to it, there will always be some of that grimy film still on the car.
I dunno. Maybe it's just that I've never learned how to floss properly but my Waterpik has been a very easy to use and effective substitute for dental floss.

This is what I have.

Waterpik Complete Care Water Flosser and Sonic Toothbrush (WP-900)

I used to go to the dentist for cleaning and/or gum treatment every 3 months or so but ever since I started using the Waterpik flosser and sonic toothbrush, my teeth and gums are much better and I only go for cleaning twice a year. The brush has a gentle setting which is what I used for a few months but after a while, I was able to use the more powerful setting (which was much more effective).
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Old 02-18-2016, 10:10 AM   #11
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The young wife and I each have a Sonicare and they seem to work for us, but I'd trust a dentist like HadEnuff before I'd listen to me. One contribution I can make, however, is to note that electric toothbrushes tend to be on sale around Father's Day at CVS, Walgreens, Target etc. With store and manufacturers coupons, you can get them relatively inexpensively.
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Old 02-18-2016, 10:12 AM   #12
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I use an Oral B model that times your brushing: 30 seconds per quadrant. That way you don't over or under brush. I think it also has a gentle setting but I prefer the full power. One thing to remember is not use a lot of force like you tend to do with a manual toothbrush. The oscillating head gets the job done, you only have to make relatively light contact with the teeth. I would add that After brushing and flossing at night, I use an anti plaque mouthwash. That seems to have helped to reduce tartar buildup as the dentist had me coming in every 4 months for a cleaning but we've gone back to every 6 months.
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Old 02-18-2016, 10:28 AM   #13
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a water pik can be a useful adjunct. It won't take the place of brushing and flossing, though. It will remove pieces of food, and can be used to deliver antimicrobial agents (usually something like Listerine) into hard to reach areas.

However, it should be done with the guidance of your dental professional, and IMO on a low setting.

It won't remove plaque like a bristle or a piece of floss will.
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Old 02-18-2016, 10:31 AM   #14
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I dunno. Maybe it's just that I've never learned how to floss properly but my Waterpik has been a very easy to use and effective substitute for dental floss.

This is what I have.

Waterpik Complete Care Water Flosser and Sonic Toothbrush (WP-900)

I used to go to the dentist for cleaning and/or gum treatment every 3 months or so but ever since I started using the Waterpik flosser and sonic toothbrush, my teeth and gums are much better and I only go for cleaning twice a year. The brush has a gentle setting which is what I used for a few months but after a while, I was able to use the more powerful setting (which was much more effective).
if your dentist is happy with the results, then you are good. I haven't seen it work that well, but you should trust the folks who actually are looking in there. It is the results that count.
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Old 02-18-2016, 11:09 AM   #15
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We use(per Dentist) Sonic care brush and DW has a Sonic care flosser. I just floss and have no issues after starting the Sonic care brushing. Before the hygienist was complaining about my gums. Six months later they're much improved.

DW gets major plaque build up and get 3 cleanings yearly. Last 4 months the air flosser broke and I replaced it with a regular waterpik. Big mistake DW had a horrible cleaning and hygienist was adamant about an air flosser for her. YMMV.
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Old 02-18-2016, 02:45 PM   #16
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+1
Debridement is not the same as gargling!
There is an actual insurance code for debridement. Debridement is done when there is so much calculus (tarter), that you are unable to properly asses the health of the soft tissues, can't probe the pockets around the teeth. Gargling with any solution is not going to remove the calculus.
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Old 02-18-2016, 03:23 PM   #17
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There is an actual insurance code for debridement. Debridement is done when there is so much calculus (tarter), that you are unable to properly asses the health of the soft tissues, can't probe the pockets around the teeth. Gargling with any solution is not going to remove the calculus.

One more reason to hate calculus...
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Old 02-18-2016, 03:26 PM   #18
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One more reason to hate calculus...
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