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Old 02-21-2008, 08:46 AM   #21
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Dumont, Kaiser, Emerson, English Racers, CP/M, Flip-off cardboard caps on milk bottles - usually with just a little cream sticking to them, fla-vr-straws, 7-game (max) post-season baseball, weekly reader.
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Old 02-21-2008, 09:06 AM   #22
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I remember all of them but don't know for how much longer.
....That's pretty funny!

Wait, what were we talking about? :confused:
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Old 02-21-2008, 09:10 AM   #23
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5 cent Cokes, which were neither snorted or smoked.
High beam switch on the floorboard, left of the brake pedal.
Steel pedal cars for the kids.
Flexible Flyer sleds were the best.
Full-service gas stations (my first job was a "Platform Petroleum Engineer" aka "Pump Jocky". We checked the oil, cleaned windshields, checked tires & other fluids on request. And politely.
Big steel hot-water radiators under each window in the house. It took "two men and a boy" to carry one.
It was a big deal when the drugstore got air conditioning.
A window air conditioner in the house was a miracle.
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Old 02-21-2008, 10:02 AM   #24
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5 cent Cokes, which were neither snorted or smoked.
They were even just 5 cents from a machine. The small ones tasted better, though nobody knew exactly why.

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High beam switch on the floorboard, left of the brake pedal.
Steel pedal cars for the kids.
Flexible Flyer sleds were the best.
Full-service gas stations (my first job was a "Platform Petroleum Engineer" aka "Pump Jocky". We checked the oil, cleaned windshields, checked tires & other fluids on request. And politely.
Those were the days!! We never had to worry about fluid levels, underinflated tires, or dirty windshields back then (and never spilled gas on our clothes or had that smell of gas on our hands). Going to a gas station was a pleasant experience, and often the gas station would offer a free drink glass, free (manual) car wash, or some other freebie, if I had the tank filled.

That was a great first job for high school boys, and was easily available. A lot of my high school friends did that, too, and at the time I thought it was "so manly".

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Big steel hot-water radiators under each window in the house. It took "two men and a boy" to carry one.
I had three in my bedroom as a little girl, one under each window.

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It was a big deal when the drugstore got air conditioning.
A window air conditioner in the house was a miracle.
That's for sure. We weren't allowed to play in my parents' bedroom (which was the only room with a window A/C), but we used to walk down to the drugstore to cool off. When was the last time you heard of kids voluntarily walking to a drugstore? The A/C in drugstores was great marketing, because we would spend our allowances there, too. For 25 cents, I could get two comic books and a candy bar. Then I would sit in the shade on our back steps and read my comic books.
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Old 02-21-2008, 10:14 AM   #25
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I was born in 1944, so I remember in grade school having air raid drills where the children had to line up against the walls, sit back, hang their heads with their arms over them to protect themselves from falling debris. Just after WWII, so people were still scared. I think this stopped around 4th grade.
Remember Valomilk candy bars that looked like a small cupcake and was filled with syrupy marshmellow? My son bought me one for Xmas from Cracker Barrel, which is the only place that I know of to get them. However, in my stepfather's day, Valomilk's were the size of giant cupcakes--about 3X the size of my generation and today's. Hey...we got ripped!
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Old 02-21-2008, 10:32 AM   #26
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I was a teen during the 60's and as P.J. O'Rourke has said, "If you can remember the 60's, you were not there!"
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Old 02-21-2008, 01:10 PM   #27
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I'll be 39 soon and reading these is a mixture of, "Oh sure, I remember that", "I remember my parents talking about that", and "What is that?"

But each generation has it's own version. For me, I had to explain to my 12 year old son what a typewriter was ("Kinda like a computer keyboard, but the backspace key only worked on one letter"). He was confused and somewhat doubtful about the usefulness of such an archaic device. I didn't dare tell him that I took an entire semester class on how to type on one (IBM Selectric, which were still quite fancy then).

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Old 02-21-2008, 01:36 PM   #28
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How 'bout 'BURMA SHAVE' ..........
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Old 02-21-2008, 02:58 PM   #29
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How 'bout 'BURMA SHAVE' ..........
I googled and found this article, which includes some of their roadside ads!

Feeling nostalgic? Now you'll rave! Here's the story of Burma Shave. by Martin Waterman Issue #37
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Old 02-21-2008, 04:40 PM   #30
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But each generation has it's own version. For me, I had to explain to my 12 year old son what a typewriter was ("Kinda like a computer keyboard, but the backspace key only worked on one letter"). He was confused and somewhat doubtful about the usefulness of such an archaic device. I didn't dare tell him that I took an entire semester class on how to type on one (IBM Selectric, which were still quite fancy then).
In high school I took a typing class (one of the more useful things I learned there) for two reasons: First, I knew they couldn't require that we buy a typewriter and therefore could not assign homework, and two, I was one of two guys in a classroom full of girls. He was there for the same reasons.

Talk about a target-rich environment!

This was before IBM Selectrics though, they were manual Underwoods.
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Old 02-21-2008, 05:18 PM   #31
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In high school I took a typing class (one of the more useful things I learned there) for two reasons: First, I knew they couldn't require that we buy a typewriter and therefore could not assign homework, and two, I was one of two guys in a classroom full of girls. He was there for the same reasons.

Talk about a target-rich environment!

This was before IBM Selectrics though, they were manual Underwoods.
I had forgotten that one. About the same ratio when I took typing.

heh heh heh -
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Old 02-21-2008, 07:38 PM   #32
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there were no walk in closets?

the array of door to door service?
the bread man?
the milk man?
the egg man?
the fuller brush man?

"sneakers" were inexpensive?
most kids had at most one pair of shoes and one pair of sneakers?
everyone wore rubbers and galoshes when it rained or snowed?

there were no supermarkets?

department stores were just that?
payments were sent to a central cashier by pneumatic tube or by "rope and pulley" tram?

school children went home for lunch?
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I remember:

Outhouses and chamber pots, well pumps, b&w tv, monophonic recordings, milk men, milk in glass bottles, dime stores, soda fountains, wringer washers, beer cans w/o pull tabs, .....highways pre-interstate, ........ drive-in movies, drive-in restaurants with carhops, service stations...

I remember when our little town had a furniture store, a clothing store, a dime store, and passenger rail service...
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Kids "smoked" candy cigarettes

Cars had fins and no power steering, no power windows, no power seats, no automatic transmission, bench seats with cloth, huge steering wheels, small triangular windows next to the roll up ones, trunks were huge, backseats were the size of a living room sofa,.........

Small towns had railroad tracks through the middle of town; frequently dividing the town in half.
Yep, I remember a bunch of those things! And we still don't have walk-in closets! We DO have those big, heavy cast-iron radiators in each room....they sure are nice when you come in from out in the cold & snow, you can sit on one of the low ones and get warm quickly....also great for drying wet mittens!

We had milk, bread and eggs delivered every other day...and a bit extra on Fridays to last the weekend. And we were fortunate.....because we had one pair of sneakers, and TWO pairs of 'real' shoes (1 pair for school & 1 for church). And though they are starting to disappear....we still have a couple of furniture stores, and 2 clothing stores (1 is men's clothing only, and the other is women's clothing only). We just lost our last 'downtown' shoe stores about a year ago....it had been open for over 100 years....but the likes of Payless and Wal-mart "done 'em in".

The 2 old maids that used to live behind us had the last outhouse in town. We still have a B&W TV in the back room at home....with UHF & channels 2-13! Also still have (and occasionally play) 45's & 33 1/3 vinyl....and have an 8-track player hooked-up and working on my stereo. Our town was (is) split north to south AND east to west by railroad tracks.....and BOTH used to offer passenger service. There is still one operating Drive-in movie theater not too far away! And another town just a few miles away has a family owned burger joint with car-hops! The same family has run it since the 1920's!

And my 1st cars and trucks were big enough that I could climb in under the hood, sit on the fender-well, and work on them. We always thought power-anything was for sissies! One time I rear-ended a mid-70's Dodge Dart with my '69 Ford Galaxy 500 at about 35-40mph, it put a dent about the size of a golf ball in the front of my hood and cracked a couple of spots of bondo......put the rear bumper of the Dart about 6" from the little old lady's backseat....I guess she had "crumple zones"!

Sure wish they made cars like that today.....like my ol' Galaxy, or my Pontiac Bonneville and Catalina, or how about the '68 Chrysler New Yorker.....talk about tanks! Those were the days! Cars were HUGE.....and SOLID.....and gas was CHEAP!
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Old 02-22-2008, 05:18 AM   #33
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And my 1st cars and trucks were big enough that I could climb in under the hood, sit on the fender-well, and work on them. We always thought power-anything was for sissies!

Sure wish they made cars like that today.....like my ol' Galaxy, or my Pontiac Bonneville and Catalina, or how about the '68 Chrysler New Yorker.....talk about tanks! Those were the days! Cars were HUGE.....and SOLID.....and gas was CHEAP!
Yes, I remember setting the points on a '55 Dodge flathead six. I was skinny enough (130 lbs.) that I could wriggle down in there and sit next to the engine.

For a while we had a '62 Chrysler New Yorker station wagon bought used. The thing was a tank. 440 c.i. hemi, dual exhaust, four-barrel carb. Washing it, the roof looked the size of a football field. It had A/C that worked for about a year, but Dad was too cheap to have it fixed.
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Old 02-22-2008, 08:23 AM   #34
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I'll be 39 soon and reading these is a mixture of, "Oh sure, I remember that", "I remember my parents talking about that", and "What is that?"

But each generation has it's own version. For me, I had to explain to my 12 year old son what a typewriter was ("Kinda like a computer keyboard, but the backspace key only worked on one letter"). He was confused and somewhat doubtful about the usefulness of such an archaic device. I didn't dare tell him that I took an entire semester class on how to type on one (IBM Selectric, which were still quite fancy then).

2Cor521
I remember learning how to type on a manual typewriter. That was before the electric models were more prevalent.
The backspace key only moved the carriage back, and didn't erase the letter that you typed. You just had to manually hold a "white-out" piece of paper and hope your fingers didn't get hit by the letter punch.
I also remember trying to figure out how we'd be tested for knowing how to type. Until I found out we had to take a timed test, with a sheet of paper taped to the top of the typewriter so that we couldn't see our hands.
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Old 02-22-2008, 08:27 AM   #35
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Yes, I remember setting the points on a '55 Dodge flathead six. I was skinny enough (130 lbs.) that I could wriggle down in there and sit next to the engine.

For a while we had a '62 Chrysler New Yorker station wagon bought used. The thing was a tank. 440 c.i. hemi, dual exhaust, four-barrel carb. Washing it, the roof looked the size of a football field. It had A/C that worked for about a year, but Dad was too cheap to have it fixed.
Walt, Chrysler never made a 440CI Hemi. Senior moment? The 440CI was a wedge.
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:01 AM   #36
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You just had to manually hold a "white-out" piece of paper and hope your fingers didn't get hit by the letter punch.
I still have some of that "white-out" paper in my desk drawer here at work, as well as bottles of that liquid white-out (which are pretty much dried up by now). Maybe it's time to get rid of these products!
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:20 AM   #37
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Walt, Chrysler never made a 440CI Hemi. Senior moment? The 440CI was a wedge.
Different topic...
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:44 AM   #38
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I still have some of that "white-out" paper in my desk drawer here at work, as well as bottles of that liquid white-out (which are pretty much dried up by now). Maybe it's time to get rid of these products!
How do you get that stuff off the computer screen?
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:46 AM   #39
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Aggie text editor?
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:57 AM   #40
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How do you get that stuff off the computer screen?
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Aggie text editor?
ROFL!! Maybe so! Did I mention that I have 3 degrees from A&M?

Yep. Time to pitch it. The liquid is drying up, and I don't even have any of the thinner for it. Or do I? Hmmm.

I forgot to mention that I also have the white tape with sticky on the back. Actually I still use that sometimes to do a quick correction to a map or figure before xeroxing for a report or handout.
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