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Replacing Tile Roofs
Old 06-03-2013, 02:30 PM   #1
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Replacing Tile Roofs

Replacing the tile roof on our home is something has been on my mind for quite some time. All the homes in our area have tile roofs and our homeowners association required tile roofs. In the last few years we have permitted metal roofs that are formed to mimic clay tiles. From street level you can't tell the difference whether a roof is clay tile or metal tile.

The problem is the price of replacement. Our home is 2520 sq ft total and would probably be representative of the area in general. Most of the homes on our street were built in 1991 which makes them 22 years old. Some people have already started replacing their roofs, something that makes us want to move before that is required. The price to replace a clay tile roof in our area runs about $35000 and the metal roofs are slightly more. If I had to replace our roof this year and then sold in a couple years, I don't know how one could recover that cost.

Just wondering if anyone has gone through this? I was thinking that it could be set up like a home improvement loan and then if you sell, the loan could be picked up by the buyer. Then again, when a home is sold, generally all liens must be satisfied. There could be an exception to this and various thoughts go through my mind constantly. Any thoughts or experience on this subject?
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:46 PM   #2
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That much for a new roof? Damn.
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:54 PM   #3
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The only times I have bought pre-existing homes were in 1978 and 1980, so I am out of touch with this, but it seems that for such an expensive roof, the condition/age of the current roof would be reflected in the asking price -- i.e. I would be willing to pay more for a place that has a newish roof than I would for one with an older roof, all other things being equal. No?
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:57 PM   #4
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Wow that is about 5 times the cost of asphalt shingles. Do you know what the expected life span is? Trying to move a house that had that future cost on the horizon would be tough too. Having it done would be adding value, but only a buyer planning to be there a long time would accept that. You could try and market it with a roofing allowance granted, but it would probably require a pretty hefty allowance. Not sure if you are working with a realtor but you could probably get some ideas from them. Sorry I couldn't help more.
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Old 06-03-2013, 03:07 PM   #5
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I think the conventional wisdom is you don't recoup 100% of the value of things like a roof replacement or HVAC, and it is typically only half or 3/4 the value at most. Having a new roof would obviously help your place sell a little faster versus a neighbor's house that had the original roof.

If you plan to sell and the roof is still within its serviceable life, I wouldn't worry about replacing unless you just want a quick sale and don't care about money. After all, you could just lower your price by $35000 vs places selling with new(ish) roofs and that would probably move your place as fast as a brand new roof and $35k higher price. You don't have to highlight the fact that buyers need to replace the roof within 3 years.
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Old 06-03-2013, 03:48 PM   #6
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Sorry, nobody is going to accept a roof loan as part of a house sale. And if they did, they'd just subtract that from their offer. You are probably best off pricing it right without the roof replacement.

Would they allow Ondura roofs? They kind of have a tile look, but are lighter weight and less expensive. My builder wanted to use it on my home, but we couldn't get it past the review board.
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Old 06-03-2013, 03:48 PM   #7
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I thought tile roofs were supposed to last like 100 years...

I must be WAY off...


OK... had to look... my bold...

"In the case of roofing tiles, manufacturers usually claim to have a life expectancy of 50 years or more. Some even guarantee their products for 75 years. This does not mean that roof tiles made out of clay for example, can last even longer. Just a look at the old Europe buildings can give you a true testament of how long and well can clay roof tile last. If the structure permits it and the weather conditions are not so harsh, they can last for centuries."
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:17 PM   #8
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I thought tile roofs were supposed to last like 100 years...

"In the case of roofing tiles, manufacturers usually claim to have a life expectancy of 50 years or more. Some even guarantee their products for 75 years. This does not mean that roof tiles made out of clay for example, can last even longer. Just a look at the old Europe buildings can give you a true testament of how long and well can clay roof tile last. If the structure permits it and the weather conditions are not so harsh, they can last for centuries."
That's what I thought.....unless something was wrong in the structure itself.
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:46 PM   #9
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I thought tile roofs were supposed to last like 100 years...

That is what I thought as well. Also looked and the info I found basically says the tile roof should outlast the structure. There shouldn't be any need to replace it.

Same with metal at 50+yrs. I had metal put on my mothers house about 15yrs ago so she wouldn't have to worry with again.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:07 PM   #10
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Timely thread for me. Looks like we will be getting a new tile roof in the next year. Home is the same age and the HOA limits our options. New roofs for neighboring homes with the same specs are costing around $25K, not including gutters and such.

The problem is not the tile but the wood underroof. The tile is all good and will last forever, until broken, but the wood support has gone bad for most of the homes, with substantial rotting and leaks. We've spent over $2K in the last four years on repair and know it is just a matter of time now.

I've seen a dozen neighboring homes get new roofs and it is a major, labor intensive project, much more labor than similar size asphalt roof. I don't see recovering the expense within a few years. Part, perhaps half (wag) but as I see homes where we live sell with identical floor plans and building specs, the full cost of the roof or replacement cost if old isn't fully reflected in the price.

I've been looking for web info on these roofs, because I've seen a couple of different ways the new roof is put on and want to know advantages and things to avoid. Also, I see a fair amount of green wood and can't help but think that will lead to problems in just a few years.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:10 PM   #11
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Also, I see a fair amount of green wood and can't help but think that will lead to problems in just a few years.
Green as in not properly cured and dried?
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:13 PM   #12
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We just bought a house with a tile roof that was built in the mid 80s. The roof is in excellent condition, and will probably outlast me, assuming no direct hurricane hits. I did have to go up and re-attach a couple of the tiles, but that was just a bucket of Portland cement and a trowel, and about an hour's time. Is there a reason your tile roof is needing replacement? Are you sure you aren't just assigning an asphalt shingle lifespan to a tile roof?
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:29 PM   #13
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Yes MichaelB, the problem always starts with leaks in various places. To others who have posted, it's not the tile that goes bad but the underlayment and how it was installed. When I was on our condo board in Ft. Myers, all tile roofs were setup as 40 year lifespan for calculating the reserves.

My neighbor who replaced his roof last year said he was just tired of chasing leaks around the house. He had about $5000 invested in leak repairs and finally decided to bite the bullet and replace the roof. He went the metal tile look and it looks really great. I watched the work being done and they really spent a lot of time on the underlayment. Also had to replace a lot of plywood. I think it's a combination of labor intensive/tile cost. So far, I haven't had any serious leaks.

We have discussed putting our home up for sale and downsize in preparation for something happening to one of us. We're thinking about an attached villa where a monthly fee covers all maintenance. This would be ideal for my wife. Maybe it's time to really get serious. We think we could make a trade like this and put $100k in the bank.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:30 PM   #14
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Green as in not properly cured and dried?
That's what it looks like to my untrained eye. They unload bundles of wood stacked on pallets and it sits there for much of the day. I see it while walking and always stop by for a close view. I also take note of who is doing the roofing (to avoid).
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:27 PM   #15
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We just bought a house with a tile roof that was built in the mid 80s. The roof is in excellent condition, and will probably outlast me, assuming no direct hurricane hits. I did have to go up and re-attach a couple of the tiles, but that was just a bucket of Portland cement and a trowel, and about an hour's time. Is there a reason your tile roof is needing replacement? Are you sure you aren't just assigning an asphalt shingle lifespan to a tile roof?
Overall, I think our roof is in good condition. In the general area where I live homes were all built starting in the late 80's through 1993. You would think a tiled roof built in 1991 would still have quite a few years left before requiring replacement. Maybe the quality of roof construction wasn't the best. I don't know. I just see a lot of replacement going on.
I know a shingle roof normally has a 25 year lifespan and a tile roof should be good for 35-40 years. I hope.
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Old 06-03-2013, 08:37 PM   #16
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I know a shingle roof normally has a 25 year lifespan and a tile roof should be good for 35-40 years. I hope.
I need a new roof also. In Florida 30 year shingle has a 17 yr average life. Tile should last "forever".
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Old 06-03-2013, 08:49 PM   #17
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I need a new roof also. In Florida 30 year shingle has a 17 yr average life. Tile should last "forever".
In Mediterranean countries with mild weather and not much in the way of storms and stone or masonry houses, I'd imagine a tile roof would last forever, or at least until the earthquake comes.

My parents had a 110 year old masonry house with a slate roof that had never been replaced. Although the occasional storm required some tile replacement, which was fairly expensive since it is not a job for the typical roofing company.

My Sis still lives in the neighborhood and she says she has never seen any repairs going on up there 20 years along after parents sold.

Still, when given the choice, I'll take a condo with lots of people standing by to pick up their part of the check for any repairs.

Ha
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Old 06-04-2013, 11:39 PM   #18
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Are any of these tile roofs (or the wood under them) being affected by acid rain?

http://www.usc.edu/CSSF/History/2006/Projects/J1111.pdf
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Old 06-05-2013, 04:07 PM   #19
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I think there is a difference in the underlay. We have a cement tile underlay on top of parota beam wood (highly dense and resistant to termites). We just treat the wood each few years to keep the termites at bay. That and replacing the odd broken tile.

This is much different than tiles on wood. Is there any definitive source that spells it all out?
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Old 06-06-2013, 10:04 AM   #20
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Overall, I think our roof is in good condition. In the general area where I live homes were all built starting in the late 80's through 1993. You would think a tiled roof built in 1991 would still have quite a few years left before requiring replacement. Maybe the quality of roof construction wasn't the best. I don't know. I just see a lot of replacement going on.
I know a shingle roof normally has a 25 year lifespan and a tile roof should be good for 35-40 years. I hope.
I think any roof's lifespan is a function of the weather it is subjected to, so I could easily see how hurricane winds and rain could render tile roofs in Florida to need much sooner replacement. Those roofs are also quite heavy and may affect the supporting roof structure underneath.

Our house in Texas was built in 1993, and is on its 4th composite roof, all with 35yr shingles. Being the hail capital of the US takes its toll on ones insurance costs.
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