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Resume - name current employer?
Old 07-05-2011, 02:17 PM   #1
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Resume - name current employer?

If currently employed, should you put your current employer or say, "large investment firm" so you don't accidentally get fired?
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Old 07-05-2011, 04:27 PM   #2
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Try "Fortune 500 Company" or lagre investmant firm (More information upon interview). Why blow your cover?
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Old 07-05-2011, 04:51 PM   #3
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I'm a bit puzzled by the question. Presumably your resume will go into a website like Monster.com at some point. The skills you have in your current jobs, will presumably be of interest to your current investment firm. They will then see that John Galt is currently employed so won't the cat be out of the bag?

I am pretty sure the online resume place like monster have tools to protect your confidentiality.
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:38 PM   #4
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I would use resume submission methods that protect your confidentiality. Directly submit your resume rather than generally posting it on a job hunting site. Some sites have the option to not make your resume publicly available.
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:15 PM   #5
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In my world, it would be normal to list one's present employer. It is very easy to find out which organization I work(ed) for. Anyone who wanted to know could just Google my name.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:39 AM   #6
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If currently employed, should you put your current employer or say, "large investment firm" so you don't accidentally get fired?
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I'm a bit puzzled by the question. Presumably your resume will go into a website like Monster.com at some point. The skills you have in your current jobs, will presumably be of interest to your current investment firm. They will then see that John Galt is currently employed so won't the cat be out of the bag?
I am pretty sure the online resume place like monster have tools to protect your confidentiality.
I'm glad you're puzzled too. I thought my puzzlement was coming from never having a real job.

Would an employer fire you just for floating a resume?

If an employer would fire you for floating a resume, would you want to work there in the first place?

If you're floating a resume, aren't you planning to leave that employer anyway? Wouldn't it be better to be fired (with unemployment benefits) than to resign?

And finally, wouldn't the hiring company want to know where you're working, or at the very least wonder why you're being coy about it?
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:45 AM   #7
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I thought my puzzlement was coming from never having a real job.
My goodness - you finally admit it?

Just a story I've repeated many times. When it came time to re-enlist, I told the OIC that I would "flip a coin". If it stayed in the air, he could give me the papers to sign.

Guess what happened?
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:48 AM   #8
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I've always included my present and prior employers, but I've never used one of those broadcast methods of job hunting. I mail them with a cover letter to the person I want to work for, but I'm old fashioned in an old fashioned town.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:51 AM   #9
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If I were currently working, I'd keep the employer name off the resume. Just identify the state, employed date from_date to present, and the job description.

So what if your current employer gets the resume, it goes to HR which will eventually key word match it to written department job reqs. It unlikely that any one in management will even see it since they are looking to fill a vacant position, not your position which is currently filled. And even if a manager sees it, he will have to spend an extraordinary amount of time correlating your resume name with a company employee list. Not a likely occurrence.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:55 AM   #10
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I'm glad you're puzzled too. I thought my puzzlement was coming from never having a real job.
I think that explains some of the questions you asked.
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Would an employer fire you just for floating a resume?
In a word, yes. At the very least it could have some of the more unenlightened members of management question your loyalty. No, it doesn't make sense but it is reality.
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If an employer would fire you for floating a resume, would you want to work there in the first place?
You may not want to, but mortgage, utility, car, and grocery bills an be strong motivators.
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If you're floating a resume, aren't you planning to leave that employer anyway? Wouldn't it be better to be fired (with unemployment benefits) than to resign?
I have first hand experience that it is much easier to look for a job when you already have one. Pre-FIRE unemployment is highly overrated.
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And finally, wouldn't the hiring company want to know where you're working, or at the very least wonder why you're being coy about it?
I think they will understand your reluctance to provide the info up front. It is (was?) common practice to leave the current employer name off a written resume and you can fill in all the details at an interview.
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Old 07-06-2011, 11:03 AM   #11
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It is normal to be coy, particularly if you are a manager. That is why many corporations employ recruiters that specialize finding applicants.

I recommend applying only at employer based websites but be aware that some medium sized employers use a resume management services that share resumes. If, for example, you are a bio scientist applying for a job in the Bay Area there is a chance that other employers will see your resume. You want to be sure that the resume service asks your permission first. The good ones won't share it with your current employer (this is all done with electronic screening) but nothing is fullproof.

The best way to search for a new job is to attend industry or professional conference social hours or expos. Do the old meet and greet, never uttering a disparaging word but letting people know you are open to a new challange. Have a pen in your pocket so that you can write your personal cell phone number on a card if asked. You can always say that you don't use your employer's resources for personal matters.
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Old 07-06-2011, 11:40 AM   #12
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There is no single answer to this question. If you are responding to a listing or a request for your resume, you should include your current employer and indicate they should not be contacted without your authorization. If you are posting your resume on a public job site you should not disclose your name or current employer.
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Would an employer fire you just for floating a resume?
Not usually. A very sensitive job or an unusually punitive employer might be a problem. Biggest risk (IMHO) is a marginal employee with an employer looking for an excuse to fire.

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If an employer would fire you for floating a resume, would you want to work there in the first place?
Members around here would rather not work at all. But yes, an employer that fires just for posting resumes sounds like a nasty place.

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If you're floating a resume, aren't you planning to leave that employer anyway? Wouldn't it be better to be fired (with unemployment benefits) than to resign?
Probably not. Your previous employer canít badmouth you in a way that affects your future employability, but they can say youíve been fired if itís true. The job candidate always wants to say they took the initiative to leave for opportunities to grow.

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And finally, wouldn't the hiring company want to know where you're working, or at the very least wonder why you're being coy about it?
Of course. A candidate wonít be considered unless current employer is identified, and confidentially is respected if requested. When the interview process reaches the point where the prospective employer is considering making an offer Ė or down to the final two or three candidates, the candidate needs to authorize contacting the current employer.
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Old 07-06-2011, 12:37 PM   #13
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In general, I do not think posting your resume on a general jobs board is a good idea. A targeted approach to put your resume in the hands of the hiring mananger or recruiter will be much more effective and there should be little chance your present employer would catch wind that you are seaching. Network as much as possible, and I'd get on Linkedin if you haven't already.
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Old 07-06-2011, 12:52 PM   #14
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I think that explains some of the questions you asked.
In a word, yes. At the very least it could have some of the more unenlightened members of management question your loyalty. No, it doesn't make sense but it is reality.
You may not want to, but mortgage, utility, car, and grocery bills an be strong motivators.
I have first hand experience that it is much easier to look for a job when you already have one. Pre-FIRE unemployment is highly overrated.
I think they will understand your reluctance to provide the info up front. It is (was?) common practice to leave the current employer name off a written resume and you can fill in all the details at an interview.
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There is no single answer to this question. If you are responding to a listing or a request for your resume, you should include your current employer and indicate they should not be contacted without your authorization. If you are posting your resume on a public job site you should not disclose your name or current employer.
Not usually. A very sensitive job or an unusually punitive employer might be a problem. Biggest risk (IMHO) is a marginal employee with an employer looking for an excuse to fire.
Members around here would rather not work at all. But yes, an employer that fires just for posting resumes sounds like a nasty place.
Probably not. Your previous employer canít badmouth you in a way that affects your future employability, but they can say youíve been fired if itís true. The job candidate always wants to say they took the initiative to leave for opportunities to grow.
Of course. A candidate wonít be considered unless current employer is identified, and confidentially is respected if requested. When the interview process reaches the point where the prospective employer is considering making an offer Ė or down to the final two or three candidates, the candidate needs to authorize contacting the current employer.
I can understand the vocabulary and think logically about the situation, but business etiquette the unwritten cultural practices leave me mystified. Nuclear reactors and weapons safety rules seemed so much simpler by comparison.

I think merely asking the questions about floating a resume indicates that one is already mentally & emotionally cutting ties with the employer. They had their chance, and for whatever reason they blew it. When the resume software starts showing up on the computer then it's probably also time to start checking that the emergency fund can handle a few months of mortgage, utilities, & groceries...
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Old 07-06-2011, 01:16 PM   #15
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I had never considered not listing a current employer on a resume. I guess in my industry, it is small enough such that you can't really prevent word getting out that you are looking. Sure, maybe a discreet inquiry or two could be placed, but hard to keep it a complete secret if you go beyond a circle of your most trustworthy friends/associates.

There are possibly a few pluses to keeping your employer on the resume. One is name brand recognition. If you work for a firm that is known for hiring good people, that could make your resume pop. Another reason to disclose the employer is to allow word to get back to your manager that you are "reviewing other opportunities". A gamble to be sure, but you could end up getting some compensation to keep you on board if you are valued. Best to know which quartile you rank in before employing this strategy however.
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Old 07-06-2011, 02:50 PM   #16
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I can understand the vocabulary and think logically about the situation, but business etiquette the unwritten cultural practices leave me mystified. Nuclear reactors and weapons safety rules seemed so much simpler by comparison.

I think merely asking the questions about floating a resume indicates that one is already mentally & emotionally cutting ties with the employer. They had their chance, and for whatever reason they blew it. When the resume software starts showing up on the computer then it's probably also time to start checking that the emergency fund can handle a few months of mortgage, utilities, & groceries...
Agree. The question might also show that the person asking is see the writing on the walls - signs that the employer isn't happy. These are not mutually exclusive.
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Old 07-06-2011, 03:03 PM   #17
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I think merely asking the questions about floating a resume indicates that one is already mentally & emotionally cutting ties with the employer. When the resume software starts showing up on the computer then it's probably also time to start checking that the emergency fund can handle a few months of mortgage, utilities, & groceries...
I'd never wait to go fishing until I had nothing else to eat. Sometimes you catch one, sometimes you don't. And you can't catch a big one if you don't wet a hook once in a while...
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Old 07-06-2011, 03:47 PM   #18
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I'd never wait to go fishing until I had nothing else to eat. Sometimes you catch one, sometimes you don't. And you can't catch a big one if you don't wet a hook once in a while...
As an employer I'd want an employee that would look to grow internally, improve his/her skill level, show the capability to contribute more and then together look for an internal opportunity to do so.
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Old 07-07-2011, 10:45 PM   #19
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My reaction when I found out people were looking was if they worked for me and were good, was to try and see if I could keep them. If they weren't good then make sure that didn't get plum and/or critical assignments. More commonly, I'd find out the Joe who worked for Susie, who was my peer, was looking. In general, it isn't good for your employer to find out you are looking for a new job, although in most places I doubt it is a fire-able offense. One of the few times I had to lay off employees, the easiest person to get rid was the guy that seemed to be gone a few times a week between 11: and 1:30 and was also dressed well those days.
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Old 07-07-2011, 10:51 PM   #20
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I am pretty sure the online resume place like monster have tools to protect your confidentiality.
Do not count on this. We see current employees who post on job boards all the time. Some companies take this as a sign of disloyalty and some take it as standard practice. I don't think it ever works to your advantage with a current employer.
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