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Scotch recommendation
Old 11-19-2015, 06:21 PM   #1
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Scotch recommendation

New neighbor , likes Scotch... Me, not so much. Any recommendations that won't break the bank but will please a true Scotch drinker? Thanks


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Old 11-19-2015, 06:23 PM   #2
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Glen Fiddich is one I have always liked. Smooth.


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Old 11-19-2015, 06:27 PM   #3
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My vote is for Ledaig 10 Year or Aberfeldy (12) but these run about 45 bucks in my state. What is the budget?
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Old 11-19-2015, 06:50 PM   #4
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If you know what brand they drink buy that. I use to drink scotch on the rocks and only liked my brand. I drank a blend. The single malt tasted too harsh for me.
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Old 11-19-2015, 06:55 PM   #5
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I know the thread title says Scotch, but I'll put my vote in for some Irish Whiskey. Knappogue, the 16 year is fine, but the 12 year will do in a pinch.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:06 PM   #6
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A brief education, from touring a few distilleries during my trip to Scotland last year. Disclaimer, I'm much more of a bourbon drinker, so someone with a better scotch appreciation can correct me where I'm wrong, and I won't argue (probably).

Single malt scotch is basically "pure" scotch. Blended scotch is scotch mixed with (EDIT) other whiskies such as grain (probably not grain alcohol as I first said, I think there's a diff). That's why you see a huge price rise with single malts. Cutty Sark is an example of a blend. There's probably a lot more to it but that's the basics as I understand it. If you (or he) are going to sip scotch straight or with a few drops of water or on rocks, you probably want single malt. If you're going to make scotch and soda or some other mixed drink, it seems to me you might as well go with a blend since you're already cutting and masking the real scotch flavor. Kind of like how you wouldn't waste filet mignon in a beef stew. No judgement on one way or other, in my mind you ought to enjoy your liquor how you want to, not how someone tells you.

As far as the single malts go, there are 4 regions in Scotland and they each have a unique taste, depending on a lot of factors such as the peat used in the process. If he's a true afficiando, find out which region he likes (Lowland, Highland, Speyside, or Islay) and do a bit of research to find a decent scotch from that region that stays true to the region. I'd have to google to remind myself of what each type tastes like, so you can do that yourself.

That said, few would turn down a Glenfiddich (pronounced GlenfiddICK, think how you would pronounce the "ch" in Loch Ness) from Speyside or Macallan (Highland), though some snobs might call Glenfiddich mass produced and over priced. I liked it well enough that I brought a 15 yr old cask strength bottle home from my trip.

Even though I'm not a big scotch drinker I had fun spending a bit of the trip learning these things and trying some different brands and types. You might enjoy dropping a little knowledge on your neighbor. If he looks at you like you're an idiot, blame it on a bum from the internet!
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:08 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman59 View Post
Glen Fiddich is one I have always liked. Smooth.
I think that's why I like it, it's smoother than most. Some have such a strong peaty or smokey taste that I don't really enjoy it.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:09 PM   #8
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Without a budget or knowing their tastes (highland or lowland) that could be tough.

A good generic 10 year old scotch that seems to satisfy most palates though is a 10 year Glenmorangie. I would be happy with that as a gift, even though there are other scotches I like better. But I also have that in my cabinet. It is one I recommend to people who want to learn to like scotch as it is a good one to start off with in my opinion and it should be int the $40-50 range.

I actually have quite the array of scotches right now. I have several small clients who usually owe me something like $200 and it takes forever to get paid by them. I call them my "scotch clients" I have already written them off but invoice them every month and harass them--and amazingly they ALL have paid up. When I get that $200 or so, I go buy 2-3 bottles of scotch! Figure I have already written it off so why not indulge.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:09 PM   #9
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Whatever you do, always remember that it's whisky, not whiskey.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:14 PM   #10
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I prefer single malts but a good blended scotch I have tried recently is Monkey Shoulder at about $30 a bottle.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:15 PM   #11
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loch dhu?
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Single Malt Scotch 101
Old 11-19-2015, 07:17 PM   #12
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Single Malt Scotch 101

My recommendation is to be a star and get something a bit out-of-the ordinary. Go to a liquor store (BevMo or Total Wine has a great selection). I am a fan of scotches from the Speyside region of Scotland. Look for names like:

Balvenie - Their "Doublewood" is aged first in flamed oak, then transferred to Sherry casks for final maturity. It is lovely and will cost you about $50.

Glenfarclas - Anything they distill is marvelous. Heavily sherried flavor and my personal favorite. Cost probably starts about $70.

MacCallan is a well known distiller, but heads above the commonplace Glenfarclas or Glenlivit. You can't go wrong with this Scotch. Cost $60+

My new favorite is Abelour, after taking a four hour tour of the distillery last year. They have a sherry finished malt as well as one that is finished in bourbon casks.

You may come across a variety of scotches from the island of Islay (pronounced "Eye -Lah"). The Islays have a following, but they are not for the faint-hearted. Popular Islays include Bowmar, Lagavulin, & Laphroig. They are very smoky with a distinct flovour of peat and iodine. I have never been a fan and re-gifted a $90 bottle recently.

For something light-bodied, I'd go with a Dalwhinnie or Cragenmore. The Crag is quite lovely.

Glenrothies is very nice in its small round bottle. It has nodes of vanilla, something unusual for single malt scotch.

Glenmorangie has an incredible selection of malts all aged in various woods, including Madera and Claret. I would never turn down a Glenmorangie (pronounced Glen MORANGIE - It rhymes with the word "orangie"). Cost is about $60.

Another interesting scotch from the Isl of Sky is Talisker. It is quite peppery in is flavour, but still quite drinkable.

Believe it or not, you can often find some very nice single malts at Costco and last year I found a fantastic 20 year old malt (re-branded to Kirkland) at $35. It was easily a $100 bottle of scotch.

I am often gifted bottles of scotch. I cringe inside when I'm given a bottle of Johnny Walker "Blue" which cost $165 at Costco and over $200 elsewhere. The intentions are nice, but I would have so much more preferred a Glenfarclas or even a MacCallan at much less money.

Personally I'd forget the Glenfiddich or Glenlivit. Not they are bad scotches, but they are so readily available everywhere aren't unique or special.

Single malt scotches are like wine - each is so different and an adventure. If you stay with a scotch from the Speyside, Highlands or Lowlands regions you can't go wrong. As I said, I'd avoid the malts from Islay.

If you really want to impress your neighbor say the word "SLAINTE" when you hand him the bottle. It is pronounced Slan -Cha with the emphasis on the first syllable. It is the Gaelic equivalent to Salude or L'Chaim.

Now, I believe it is time for a wee dram myself.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:17 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hakuna matata View Post
I prefer single malts but a good blended scotch I have tried recently is Monkey Shoulder at about $30 a bottle.
I remember having that and liking it! Didn't realize or at least remember that it was a blend, but a quick search show that it's a blend of 3 pretty good malts, and no cheaper whiskies.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:59 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Avocadorunner View Post
My recommendation is to be a star and get something a bit out-of-the ordinary. Go to a liquor store (BevMo or Total Wine has a great selection). I am a fan of scotches from the Speyside region of Scotland. Look for names like:

Balvenie - Their "Doublewood" is aged first in flamed oak, then transferred to Sherry casks for final maturity. It is lovely and will cost you about $50.

Glenfarclas - Anything they distill is marvelous. Heavily sherried flavor and my personal favorite. Cost probably starts about $70.

MacCallan is a well known distiller, but heads above the commonplace Glenfarclas or Glenlivit. You can't go wrong with this Scotch. Cost $60+

My new favorite is Abelour, after taking a four hour tour of the distillery last year. They have a sherry finished malt as well as one that is finished in bourbon casks.

You may come across a variety of scotches from the island of Islay (pronounced "Eye -Lah"). The Islays have a following, but they are not for the faint-hearted. Popular Islays include Bowmar, Lagavulin, & Laphroig. They are very smoky with a distinct flovour of peat and iodine. I have never been a fan and re-gifted a $90 bottle recently.

For something light-bodied, I'd go with a Dalwhinnie or Cragenmore. The Crag is quite lovely.

Glenrothies is very nice in its small round bottle. It has nodes of vanilla, something unusual for single malt scotch.

Glenmorangie has an incredible selection of malts all aged in various woods, including Madera and Claret. I would never turn down a Glenmorangie (pronounced Glen MORANGIE - It rhymes with the word "orangie"). Cost is about $60.

Another interesting scotch from the Isl of Sky is Talisker. It is quite peppery in is flavour, but still quite drinkable.

Believe it or not, you can often find some very nice single malts at Costco and last year I found a fantastic 20 year old malt (re-branded to Kirkland) at $35. It was easily a $100 bottle of scotch.

I am often gifted bottles of scotch. I cringe inside when I'm given a bottle of Johnny Walker "Blue" which cost $165 at Costco and over $200 elsewhere. The intentions are nice, but I would have so much more preferred a Glenfarclas or even a MacCallan at much less money.

Personally I'd forget the Glenfiddich or Glenlivit. Not they are bad scotches, but they are so readily available everywhere aren't unique or special.

Single malt scotches are like wine - each is so different and an adventure. If you stay with a scotch from the Speyside, Highlands or Lowlands regions you can't go wrong. As I said, I'd avoid the malts from Islay.

If you really want to impress your neighbor say the word "SLAINTE" when you hand him the bottle. It is pronounced Slan -Cha with the emphasis on the first syllable. It is the Gaelic equivalent to Salude or L'Chaim.

Now, I believe it is time for a wee dram myself.
+1 Glenmorangie myself. (Talisker comes off too peaty for me)
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Old 11-19-2015, 08:10 PM   #15
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Did a blind taste test of various Scotches with the gal - she nailed the Isle of Islay Scotch by pronouncing it to have the distinct smell of a burning pile of tires. Think the brand (knowing me) was Tavis McCheapstard O' Pinchpenny Lane.
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Old 11-19-2015, 08:36 PM   #16
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Never met a Scotch I liked, and I've tried many of the so called "best". If I were an alcoholic and Scotch was the only hard liquor available, I'd be cured.

Now if we wanted to reignite, the "best beer threads", I'll be all in.
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Old 11-19-2015, 09:52 PM   #17
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Tough call as each seasoned scotch drinker usually has his preferences. My absolute favorite is Springbank. I think that Glenmorangie is a crowd pleaser in general - that's the one I gift the most- and it is affordable. Balvenie Doublewood, MacCallan 12, Glenfiddich 15 also seem to be enjoyed by many. For those who prefer peaty whiskies, I think that Lagavulin 16 is one of the safer bets.
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:49 AM   #18
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I know the thread title says Scotch, but I'll put my vote in for some Irish Whiskey. Knappogue, the 16 year is fine, but the 12 year will do in a pinch.
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Whatever you do, always remember that it's whisky, not whiskey.
If it's Irish, it's whiskey. MichaelB is correct.
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Old 11-20-2015, 08:00 AM   #19
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Johnnie Walker Black is my usual go to scotch, but I think I'll try some of the suggestions here, though I may have to drive down to Delaware to find a Total Wine store.


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Old 11-20-2015, 08:17 AM   #20
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My 2 favorites are readily available here in Texas and are

Laphroaig 10 year (Islay) and Highland Park 12 year (Orkney)

My wife's favorite is Talisker 10 year (Skye)
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