Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Should Patients Record Their Doctors' Visits?
Old 04-13-2017, 09:44 AM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 5,137
Should Patients Record Their Doctors' Visits?

A headline is from today's Wall Street Journal: Should Patients Record Their Doctors' Visits?

I am not a subscriber, so can not read the article. The headline is good enough for me.

In my experience a visit to the doc involves much note taking by the nurse, doctor, sometimes docs give prattle off what seems like a canned set of instructions. Then they do some more writing.

The few times I took notes the doc always was keenly interested in what I wrote and peaked over my shoulder to read it.

The problem I see is that the patient rarely gets to read what the doc writes. When instructions are given it is expected that the be followed to T. Else the doc writes ---noncompliant with instructions, orders

Seems recording at least the instructions would be most helpful a half hour after exiting the office. If diagnosis is something bad, the patient's brain usually gets moribound on the diagnosis and never registers the instructions. The prescription to take whatever, is not really helpful in understanding what the ramifications of the diagx is. Thus many turn to doctor google for enlightenment which may in fact lead them down the primrose path or worse.

Opinions?
__________________

__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-13-2017, 09:51 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
easysurfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by ls99 View Post
A headline is from today's Wall Street Journal: Should Patients Record Their Doctors' Visits?

I am not a subscriber, so can not read the article. The headline is good enough for me.

In my experience a visit to the doc involves much note taking by the nurse, doctor, sometimes docs give prattle off what seems like a canned set of instructions. Then they do some more writing.

The few times I took notes the doc always was keenly interested in what I wrote and peaked over my shoulder to read it.

The problem I see is that the patient rarely gets to read what the doc writes. When instructions are given it is expected that the be followed to T. Else the doc writes ---noncompliant with instructions, orders

Seems recording at least the instructions would be most helpful a half hour after exiting the office. If diagnosis is something bad, the patient's brain usually gets moribound on the diagnosis and never registers the instructions. The prescription to take whatever, is not really helpful in understanding what the ramifications of the diagx is. Thus many turn to doctor google for enlightenment which may in fact lead them down the primrose path or worse.

Opinions?
My doc's office has an online portal. Not for recording as in "smile, say cheese" but shows stats like my vitals, lab results, diagnosis. The online portal is good enough for me and I've found very helpful. Information like family history (example, any history of diabetes, cancer) and lab results and my vitals compared to prior years I find really informative.

I'd be afraid an audio/video recording of the visit might make the doc be self-conscious and act differently. Plus, I have no desire to get any audio or video of myself during a physical .
__________________

__________________
Have you ever seen a headstone with these words
"If only I had spent more time at work" ... from "Busy Man" sung by Billy Ray Cyrus
easysurfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 09:52 AM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Gotadimple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,000
I can see my patient notes online. It depends on the level of automation at the clinic/practice. You can always ask for a copy of the chart notes - you paid for the visit. They belong to you.

- Rita
__________________
Only got A dimple, would have preferred 2!
Gotadimple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 10:03 AM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 184
Agree with most of above. At the time I left practice we were required to provide a written summary within 48 hours of the visit. Perhaps the portal is an allowed equivalent. We did not have one when I retired.

If the issue is serious I think most people should have a companion designated as note taker and or record it with the doctor's knowledge. I would not be self conscious or worried unless I had reason to distrust the patient. I was never recorded to my knowledge but I was happy when the patient or companion cared enough to take notes.

The more serious the issue the more important this becomes. When you are getting really bad news it is almost impossible to remember much beyond the initial announcement
Sarah S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 10:03 AM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
MRG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,164
My new PCP gives me written instructions on what my followup actions are.

Years ago I did pick up the DR'S notes for a C-spine consultation with a neurosurgeon. Interesting read, perhaps written in a slightly passive style.
MRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 10:03 AM   #6
Administrator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee ba gum
Posts: 24,872
Today we took a friend of ours to the eye hospital for a follow-up to eye surgery he had done 2 weeks ago. (epiretinal membrane removal)

We waited for him in the hospital cafe and when he came back an hour later his wife grilled him on what was said. He pulled out a notepad where he and his wife had made a list of questions ahead of time (such as "when can I start swimming again"), and he had written the answers plus anything else the doctor had said.

He told me it is a lot less painful doing that than the grief he gets from his wife when he forgets to ask something or forgets instructions and advice that he had received.
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Enough private pension and SS income to cover all needs
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 10:08 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Sojourner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,100
A few years ago, I recorded several visits that I had with a specialist using my phone's "voice memo" app. Each time, I turned it on right before the doctor came in and captured everything that was said by both of us during the visit. I did this so that I'd have an exact record that I could keep forever and always refer to if/when needed. Seems like a reasonable thing to do for any kind of medical appointment where a lot of detailed information is being discussed, much of which you might forget or which you might not even consciously register at the time due to "white coat syndrome", etc.
Sojourner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 10:29 AM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,295
I would just note that in some states if you do not get the docs approval you are breaking the law....

IOW, what Sonjourner is doing could be illegal without telling the doc you are recording...
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 11:08 AM   #9
Recycles dryer sheets
littleb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 193
I think it would be very helpful to record your doctor's visit but maybe the dr. would not allow it. Due to malpractice issues or giving out the wrong information and it is all on tape.
littleb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 11:17 AM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
Beldar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 441
Like others have said, my doctor's practice has an electronic portal, where I can view all of my medical visits and stats. I can use the portal to communicate with him between visits (it's great). He also allows me to see the more detailed notes, charts, etc on the computer when I am in for a visit.

I personally don't see a need for any recording during a visit. I usually bring written requests/concerns and write down the answers I need. No problem, we have a decent discussion and make the most of the short visit.

I suspect that if I needed a complicated procedure with alot of discussion involved I would bring DW as a notetaker.

_B
Beldar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 11:23 AM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,401
As a former physician, I would be creeped out by having conversations recorded without my knowledge. If someone asked my permission, I would probably agree. Good physicians support patients in making sure we have records of the information we share and the treatment plans we agree to. Just so that we are all on the same page. In complex situations, quite frequently the patient forgets 80% of our initial discussion. So repetition and documentation are important. It's also helpful for everyone to keep a copy of the treatment plan for reference at follow up.

As an example: a close family friend was experiencing shooting pains down her arms and legs. She saw several specialists and had many investigations. The neurologist clearly noted in the chart that MS was in the differential diagnosis and that this possibility had been discussed with the patient. However, she remained in a state of denial for years, and wasted time and money going to chiropractors who manipulated her spine and to various "healers" who waved coloured stones over her. Only when her symptoms became severe did she allow herself to know that she did, in fact, gave MS, and started interferon injections.
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 11:56 AM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,838
my mother has an eye dr who has a terrible bedside manner, i used to let mom go into the room, get the instructions and before we left ask mom what she had to do, she is of the generation that just says yes dr and cant remember everything,im just stupid and i cant remember everything, when i would ask the dr what mom was supposed to do, she got all aggravated tell me that she told her and make me wait till she saw the next patient,i recording of the conversation would have made life easier, mom is 91 now we dont go to the eye dr anymore too much trouble getting mom out of the house
Blue Collar Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 12:45 PM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Flyover country
Posts: 13,380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beldar View Post
I suspect that if I needed a complicated procedure with alot of discussion involved I would bring DW as a notetaker.
This can be a huge advantage.
A number of years ago when DW was having surgery, she wanted me in the room with her. The surgeon was extremely thorough in describing everything and telling her all sorts of things about the recovery process, but DW was so nervous at the time that it all went in one ear and out the other.

For weeks afterward, I would keep saying "Don't you remember the doc telling you that ?" and getting a blank look.

So it was a very good thing for her to have me along. I decided then that if I ever needed a major procedure I would insist on having her with me for the same reason.

If she was not available, I would definitely ask the doc to let me record my instructions with my iPhone. In fact, I would guess that the doc would not only agree, but tend to be extra thorough in explaining things.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 01:12 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Fedup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Southern Cal
Posts: 4,032
I'm alway in the same room with my husband for important meeting. It's like two heads is better than one kind of thing. I tend to remember more details of the conversation with the doctor. However, if something seriously wrong with me, I would go with my oldest daughter. She would most likely pay attention to the conversation better than I can. I would be too stressed out to remember.
Fedup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 02:36 PM   #15
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 20,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Proud View Post
I would just note that in some states if you do not get the docs approval you are breaking the law....
Exactly. I'd guess most docs would be okay with it but in MD for sure recording someone's conversation without their knowledge is a crime. If they consent then of course that's fine.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 04:21 PM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 5,137
Nice to see that some note easy online access to all the doc's notes and test results.

We have an outfit called Excela as hospital and affiliated docs. They do offer online access to records. Their promise was easy ontime access to patient records. It turns out the interface is far less than user friendly, actually pretty dismal. The information is rarely updated, sometimes months go by. The system on a scale of 1 to 10 is barely a 2.

I have gotten copies of test results from the doc's office when I was interested. Maybe one day will ask for copies oft he doc's notes as well.

The Competing system UPMC appears to be better organized, I'll need to look into switching, assuming I find their system actually better and affiliated doc DW and I want to deal with. Got some homework to do
__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 04:27 PM   #17
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 505
Somewhat peripheral to the question, but my current GP was able to pull up past records from Kaiser, which I left several years ago.

I was dumbstruck.
Peter is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 04:56 PM   #18
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 6,316
I think Kaiser uses Epic as do several healthcare organizations in Portland. Providence and OHSU have a smooth data interface. Kaiser seems to want copies of x rays and records when I am confident they can find them in Epic. Whatever....
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 05:54 PM   #19
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,190
As an MD, I can't recall ever having had a problem being recorded. I wouldn't be too happy being recorded without prior consent.
6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2017, 06:01 PM   #20
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
grasshopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 1,892
I use to record my visit with my urologist with his permission. It always seemed like he was too busy taking notes while I was asking questions. A year or so ago he had an assistant transcribing for him in real time, he would look through what was noted and would give me a copy. So no more recording.
__________________

__________________
For me experiences are not good or bad, just different
grasshopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Doctors are more likely to misdiagnose patients who are jerks MichaelB Health and Early Retirement 58 03-21-2016 05:05 PM
Car rental in US for short visits from overseas landover Other topics 4 10-11-2007 12:35 PM
Moose On The Loose Visits Twin Cities Danny Other topics 9 11-10-2006 03:25 PM
Another opinion needed from doctors and patients on the board Surfdaddy Other topics 17 05-23-2006 08:49 PM
Bush sells arms to india, then visits pakistan cute fuzzy bunny Other topics 15 03-05-2006 03:28 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:01 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×