Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-29-2013, 12:24 PM   #21
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Westcliffe
Posts: 228
Old fireplace demo:


rebuild


faux rock facing install


finis
__________________

__________________
Mr. Paul is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-29-2013, 12:53 PM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 223
Wow, nice job Mr Paul. Your my hero!
__________________

__________________
DAYDREAMER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 03:06 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
zinger1457's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by harley View Post
The house is on a slab, and I'm considering redoing the tile ourselves. Is tearing it out worthwhile? Or can I just tile over the old? Or is this one of those projects that's not a good DIY fit? I'm pretty handy in general, but I've never done tile work. So, opinions from the peanut gallery? Thanks.
I've done quite a bit of tile work in my house (2 bathrooms, kitchen, dining room) and would consider tile work a good DIY job. As someone else mentioned, forget about tiling over existing tile. I've only had to remove tile from a cement slab on a small section (4'x5') but it was a royal PITA. The tiles come off easy with a hammer and chisel, it's removing the old thinset that's bonded to the cement slab that's a lot of work. There is a tool specifically made for this (electric scrapper) that some tool rental stores carry that should make the job a lot easier. I didn't use one since it was such a small area but I would definitely rent one if doing a larger area.
__________________
zinger1457 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 03:49 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by harley View Post
The house is on a slab, and I'm considering redoing the tile ourselves. Is tearing it out worthwhile? Or can I just tile over the old? Or is this one of those projects that's not a good DIY fit? I'm pretty handy in general, but I've never done tile work. So, opinions from the peanut gallery? Thanks.
Just to be clear--watchagot on the floor now? Is it vinyl or asbestos "white with pink and gray highlights floor tile" or is it ceramic/porcelain?
- Vinyl/asbestos is usually pretty easy to get up, but the mastic/glue will stay on the floor and is probably well into the concrete. Still, you can rent a machine to do the scraping and it will be good enough to allow a new bed of thinset to get a grip. Setting the new tiles is not hard, just take your time as you go, use the little plastic spacers, set each tile so it is level, and don't think you'll finish 200 sq feet in a day. It can be useful to get a helper to keep mixing mortar so you can concentrate on laying tile, it goes faster than stopping to mix more goo as needed.
-- If the tiles are possibly asbestos, get them (and the mastic that is sticking them down) tested and proceed accordingly.
- If ceramic/porcelain is there now, I don't have any experience with that. If there's any doubt about the soundness of the tile underneath, I would take it up.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 04:02 PM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
Just to be clear--watchagot on the floor now?.....
I may have misunderstood - I thought the OP had ceramic tile on the floor now. That said, in my kitchen, I had vinyl asbestos flooring that was solidly attached and I just put ceramic tile over it. Of course, that was 20 years ago, so I can't say if it will last.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 11:16 PM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,422
It's ceramic tile. And thanks for all the info. I see the "don't tile over" recommendations, but what us the reason? Not that I'm doubting you, but I like reasons, especially when I have to explain to DW. "Because the folks on the internet said so" doesn't go over too well.

The floor is in the entire house, and we may do it a room at a time over a period of years. When we bought the house there was some water problems in a bathroom, and when we removed the vanity to fix it we discovered there was no tile under the vanity. I'm suspecting it's the same in the kitchen and the other bathroom. So removing the tile is probably the best way to go, but from what DW has read it's an incredibly messy, dusty mess requiring face masks. Probably for scraping up the mastic.

Luckily, this particular job is not at the top of the priority list so I've got some time to do some research and education.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 07:21 AM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
zinger1457's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by harley View Post
It's ceramic tile. And thanks for all the info. I see the "don't tile over" recommendations, but what us the reason? Not that I'm doubting you, but I like reasons, especially when I have to explain to DW. "Because the folks on the internet said so" doesn't go over too well.
Actually it can be done as long as the existing floor is solid. Probably need to roughing (sand) the old tile first and lay down a coat of thinset to level everything and fill in the grout lines. The problem you might run into, and the reason I didn't do it, is the added height of the floor would have messed up the transition to adjacent floors, interfered with doors, etc.
__________________
zinger1457 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 08:03 AM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
Love the courage in tackling these projects.

That said, thoughts on flooring (for us, anyway) come into play. We will never go back to hard floors. Great for cleaning, and good looks, but not so much for safety in the later years, when the possibilty of falling becomes greater. One fall can mean a lifetime of being wheelchair bound. It's not so much the "softness" of the carpet, but the traction, although with the right mix of padding and style of carpet, there is a cushion effect.
Our carpeting is high quality, tight, low pile, and (gasp) off white... easy clean and no spots or apparent wear after 12 years. We plan to replace the few places (bathroom, and hall), where we use throw carpets now, with commercial carpeting as in businesses and theaters.
The other part of carpeting that we like, is the warmth underfoot, and the sound absorption.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg LivingroomXmas.jpg (345.6 KB, 11 views)
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 09:22 AM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by harley View Post
It's ceramic tile. And thanks for all the info. I see the "don't tile over" recommendations, but what us the reason? Not that I'm doubting you, but I like reasons, especially when I have to explain to DW. "Because the folks on the internet said so" doesn't go over too well.

The floor is in the entire house, and we may do it a room at a time over a period of years. When we bought the house there was some water problems in a bathroom, and when we removed the vanity to fix it we discovered there was no tile under the vanity. I'm suspecting it's the same in the kitchen and the other bathroom. So removing the tile is probably the best way to go, but from what DW has read it's an incredibly messy, dusty mess requiring face masks. Probably for scraping up the mastic.

Luckily, this particular job is not at the top of the priority list so I've got some time to do some research and education.
No doubt that removing the old tile is the cleanest way to go. For the projects I've done where I tiled over, it was either / or. I just wasn't up to a massive removal project followed by a tiling project. If the tile is held on by mastic, it might not be too bad to use a heavy duty tile stripping machine to get the floor smooth. But if the tile is held on by thin set, it may break into pieces that have to be individually chiseled off.

I'd encourage you to do a few searches over on the John Bridge forum that I linked and perhaps post there as well.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 09:24 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,411
I designed and built my own dock. The aluminum docks that are common to our area run ~$100/linear foot and mine is 48' so that would be ~$5k. I built six 8' sections from 2x6 cedar from a local sawmill, bought plastic decking hardware for the supports over the internet, and support pipes from Home Depot and am quite pleased with the result. It cost about half of an aluminium dock but is still low maintenance (just making sure the fasteners are snug each spring).

The sections are light enough that I can pretty much handle them myself (though it is much easier for two people). It takes me about 20 min to put in each spring and take out each fall.

I also improvised wheels for my boat lift with big plastic dock wheels ordered online from Home Depot and iron pipe and fittings locally.
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 09:28 AM   #31
Full time employment: Posting here.
Moscyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 728
Does learning to play piano by myself count as DIY? If yes, am doing it now.
__________________
Moscyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2013, 11:19 PM   #32
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 223
Quick update on my ductless heating/cooling DIY project. Its been 32 highs, and 24 lows the last few days, and the system is keeping our house at 72 with no problem. Did learn that the outdoor condenser goes through defrost cycles that scared me the first time it cycled. Created a whooshing sound when it started. I thought the coils blew up. The sound is normal, and happens when the refrigerant valve reverses to melt the frost on the outside coils.
So far, the house is very comfortable. This weekend will test the system when the temps drop in the teens.
__________________

__________________
DAYDREAMER is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:32 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.