Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Simpson Doors - Water Barrier Technology?
Old 06-18-2018, 09:50 AM   #1
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 503
Simpson Doors - Water Barrier Technology?

Planning to install a new wooden front entry door. Contractor wants to use Simpson, and they are recommending their 'water barrier technology'. This is essentially a thin layer of waterproof material that overlays all the flat surfaces of the door.

We're a little skeptical, since the existing wooden door has been there for 30 years and is still in good shape. It's not an issue of money, since the add-on is not expensive.

Anyone know anything about this product?
__________________

Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-18-2018, 10:07 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Sunset's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Spending the Kids Inheritance and living in Chicago
Posts: 7,238
How would this be better than any other coating like paint/marine varnish/oil stain ??

Sounds like a way to upsell to the customer, and they only warranty it for 5 years.

Ok I had to go look
Performance Series Wood Door Protection | Simpson Doors

It looks to me like you will have a nice wooden door inside the house, and an Ugly plain door outside. Why not get a Steel door for uglyness or fiberglass door that looks like wood ?

Examples: https://www.doors4home.com/c-1-entry...ior-doors.aspx
__________________

__________________
Fortune favors the prepared mind. ... Louis Pasteur
Sunset is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 10:10 AM   #3
Full time employment: Posting here.
wmc1000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Fishers
Posts: 742
Had not heard of this before so I checked it out on the Simpson website. Looks like it doesn't affect the natural wood look of the door just improves its water permeability so if it were me and the cost upgrade is rather negligible given that your previous door showed no problems after 30 years I would say yes.

http://www.simpsondoor.com/
wmc1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 10:53 AM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
CitizenK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 57
Do you have a front porch or overhang above the door? That would lessen the need for this product. At my house, the front door is flush in the plane of the facade, with no overhang for protection. The door takes a beating from rain and sun, and snow piles up against it in the winter. If your door is very exposed like that, I'd probably opt for the added protection layer. Note to self: For the next house, make sure there's a protected front porch.
CitizenK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 11:25 AM   #5
Moderator
samclem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 14,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter View Post
Planning to install a new wooden front entry door. Contractor wants to use Simpson, and they are recommending their 'water barrier technology'. This is essentially a thin layer of waterproof material that overlays all the flat surfaces of the door.
If the door you are buying is similar to the illustration they provide here, I don't know if it is right to consider it a "wood door." The exterior flat surfaces are made of medium density overlay (MDO), which is fine wood bits glued together with a water-resistant resin.

I'd be a little worried by the short warranty.
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 12:26 PM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 42,597
I don't know a thing about doors, but just had to chime in. (Feel free to skip this).

I had two metal exterior doors installed at my old house, and I am wildly enthusiastic about how they turned out. They DO THE JOB - - they are very secure, and they do not warp and they open and shut easily and without sticking.

As far as the appearance, well, paint is paint. I had them painted and they looked fine to me. Maybe I am not picky enough.

If/when I ever need a new exterior door again, I'll get a metal door.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 02:14 PM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Red Badger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Piedmont Region
Posts: 1,740
Prior one good for thirty years? Stick with wood, pocket the savings and celebrate with dinner out (or in).

Skip the up-sell with a lousy warranty.
__________________
Never let yesterday use up too much of today.
W. Rogers
Red Badger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 03:23 PM   #8
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 503
Thanks to everyone for the helpful replies! I should probably have mentioned that the door will be painted, not stained, so the appearance of the painted overlay wouldn't be too different from painted wood. But then, neither would painted fiberglass or even metal.

The existing door is solid wood, and there is quite a large overhang. In fact, it only ever gets sun in the late afternoon, and is generally sheltered from rain. I'm sure that's why it has lasted so well. I looked again at the Simpson web pages, and it appears that their doors consist of an inner core (plywood maybe?), with veneer on the inside, and the water barrier on the outside. The more I think about this, the less happy I feel.

Looks like further research on door types is needed. Thanks again for all the comments.
Peter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 03:53 PM   #9
Moderator Emeritus
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Flyover country
Posts: 13,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter View Post
they are recommending their 'water barrier technology'.
Same as car dealers recommending dealer-applied undercoating, IMHO.

Just say no.
__________________
I thought growing old would take longer.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 04:41 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OldShooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: City
Posts: 3,438
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
... The exterior flat surfaces are made of medium density overlay (MDO), which is fine wood bits glued together with a water-resistant resin. ...
If that's right, I wouldn't even consider the thing and I would look askance at the vendor overall. The only reason to use something like this is to make a cheap door.

Our front door is wood-grained fiberglass with beveled glass panels. We had it finished to be a sort of light-oak-like look and after 25 years it still looks great. It was not cheap ($1200 IIRC) but have learned the hard way that buying garbage is never a good idea.
OldShooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2018, 05:05 PM   #11
Moderator
samclem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 14,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter View Post
The more I think about this, the less happy I feel.

Looks like further research on door types is needed. Thanks again for all the comments.
If you are going to paint it, I would give strong consideration to a metal door. Very secure, dimensionally stable (so it will seal well for years) and they can be very reasonably priced. At the risk of appearing to be a shill for Menards, you might go online and design a door for yourself, see what their Mastercraft (their company line) doors would cost (they also have other materials), the options you might consider, etc. Many styles of lites, etc. I've installed 3 pre-hung doors from them. It was easy and they look good. At the very least, you'll get good exposure to what is available and have a price you can use for comparison.
__________________

samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Diving Great Barrier Reef Scuba Travel Information 17 11-29-2017 09:22 AM
Mental barrier steadystate FIRE and Money 40 03-12-2017 07:45 AM
Reduce electric bill by installing radiant barrier in attic? soupcxan FIRE and Money 102 08-19-2009 08:26 PM
Barrier investments? explanade FIRE and Money 17 09-08-2008 09:39 AM
Radiant Barrier? Leonidas FIRE and Money 29 05-28-2008 08:42 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:17 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×