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Old 02-10-2013, 10:35 PM   #21
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I bought a bottle after reading these comments. I boiled some linguine in chicken broth and water. When it was al dente, I drained it and added 1/2 a bottle of sweet and sour sauce, some chopped fresh cilantro and a liberal dose of the siracha sauce. It was delicious, at least in my opinion. And quick and easy too.

It would be great to have others share their recipes like panhead's eggs. Thanks.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:23 PM   #22
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The Huy Fong Foods (Rooster) is good. I read an article maybe a year ago about the family that started making the stuff in the US. Interesting.

Also excellent is their Chili Garlic Sauce.
I don't have a bottle of this sauce in my fridge now, but have had it, and did not know that it became ubiquitous.

This prompted me to search the Web, and I found a story about the Vietnamese immigrant who started this business: A chili sauce to crow about -The NY Times.

An excerpt follows.
Some American consumers believe sriracha (properly pronounced SIR-rotch-ah) to be a Thai sauce. Others think it is Vietnamese. The truth is that sriracha, as manufactured by Huy Fong Foods, may be best understood as an American sauce, a polyglot purée with roots in different places and peoples.
The article said that indeed, the town of Sriracha in Thailand did not recognize this sauce as coming from there.

David Tran, the 64-year-old founder of Huy Fong, was bewildered that his sauce that was aimed for Asians got used in ways he did not imagine. I also found that Bon Appétit magazine named this Sriracha sauce "Ingredient of the Year for 2010".
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:54 AM   #23
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Amazing story. Thanks for the link!
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:01 PM   #24
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I bought a bottle after reading these comments. I boiled some linguine in chicken broth and water. When it was al dente, I drained it and added 1/2 a bottle of sweet and sour sauce, some chopped fresh cilantro and a liberal dose of the siracha sauce. It was delicious, at least in my opinion. And quick and easy too.

It would be great to have others share their recipes like panhead's eggs. Thanks.
Prof12
Rub a generous amount over a tri tip roast and throw it on the barbecue. Roasting it like that will result in less spice/heat. I usually let it sit for an hour or two in a ziplock bag but that's not a necessity.
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Old 02-12-2013, 05:21 PM   #25
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Just picked up a bottle yesterday of chili-garlic sauce from the same company (huy fong). Can't wait to try it.
The mention of the Rooster triggered a memory...where had I seen that image before ?
I just rediscovered a jar of the chili-garlic sauce on the bottom shelf of my refrigerator door. I have used it in chili as a source of heat before I started growing my own hot peppers.
Time to pull out the jar and kick it up !
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Old 02-12-2013, 06:50 PM   #26
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Yes, I love that chili garlic sauce too. It's really awesome.

That Huy Fong founder really gave us Americans a gift from his motherland! Two amazing chili sauces.
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Old 02-12-2013, 09:27 PM   #27
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Yes, I love that chili garlic sauce too. It's really awesome.

That Huy Fong founder really gave us Americans a gift from his motherland! Two amazing chili sauces.
Audrey, Sriracha sauce is originally Thai, not Vietnamese.

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Old 02-12-2013, 09:47 PM   #28
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Audrey, Sriracha sauce is originally Thai, not Vietnamese.

Akai
The town may be in Thailand, but this Vietnamese immigrant developed his sauce after immigrating to the USA. Therefore it is an American sauce! or maybe Vietnamese-American.

The "gift from his motherland" referred to his family background/experience in grinding chilies and making sauces.

When you think about it, since chilies were originally introduced to Asia from the Americas, it's come full circle!!!
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:21 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by audreyh1
The town may be in Thailand, but this Vietnamese immigrant developed his sauce after immigrating to the USA. Therefore it is an American sauce! or maybe Vietnamese-American.

The "gift from his motherland" referred to his family background/experience in grinding chilies and making sauces.

When you think about it, since chilies were originally introduced to Asia from the Americas, it's come full circle!!!
I was not referring to the town of Sriracha. Sriracha sauce was originated in Thailand. The term "Sriracha Chili Sauce" was generic, sort of like Kleenex became a generic term. Several brands were available in Thailand as far back as 60 years ago. They were originally made for seafood as the town of Sriracha is a coastal town. Thai markets in Los Angeles imported them about 40 years ago, the most famous brand at the time was "Golden Mountain". Thai restaurants always serve them with fried eggs (omelet).

I am glad that it is now an American sauce.

Akai
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:37 PM   #30
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Vietnamese and Thai cuisines have a few things in common, and some of these dishes have nothing in common with Chinese dishes, for example.

While this man uses the generic name "Sriracha", the article that I quoted said that Thai people did not recognize this flavor. Apparently, there are many variants, and this man has developed something that found wider appeal. Not that I would know what or why, as I have not had any other Sriracha sauces.

The article said that this man made his sauce back in Vietnam as a condiment for Pho. Now, that soup is uniquely Vietnamese, and probably went back a very long time ago. So, this sauce version could very well be a uniquely Vietnamese flavor, if the Vietnamese have been eating Pho with this kind of sauce long before this man started his business.

So, the name of the sauce aside, we will need to organize a fact finding trip to Thailand and Vietnam, and to sample many sauces right at their origin to settle the following question: "Is this particular rooster sauce more Vietnamese or Thai in flavor?". Or could they be all the same, or so similar that the question becomes moot?

PS. Or we may find that this man has concocted something that is indeed his own, which is different than any sauces currently consumed in Vietnam and Thailand.

PPS. The following Wiki article describes the difference between Thai sauces and non-Thai (Vietnamese?) sauces. The Vietnamese call it Tuong Ot.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sriracha_sauce.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:23 PM   #31
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As mentioned earlier, I have had the "rooster sauce", but have not bought a bottle for a while. What I am using now is this Mexican hot sauce called "Valentina Salsa Picante". I picked up a bottle at a 99c store, I think, and it has lasted me a while. It sells for $2 or $3 at Walmart, but at 99c, I couldn't resist and just had to try. It's not bad. The only sauce I have not bought in a while is Tabasco. It's too vinegary for most dishes.

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Old 02-13-2013, 07:40 AM   #32
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I was not referring to the town of Sriracha. Sriracha sauce was originated in Thailand. The term "Sriracha Chili Sauce" was generic, sort of like Kleenex became a generic term. Several brands were available in Thailand as far back as 60 years ago. They were originally made for seafood as the town of Sriracha is a coastal town. Thai markets in Los Angeles imported them about 40 years ago, the most famous brand at the time was "Golden Mountain". Thai restaurants always serve them with fried eggs (omelet).

I am glad that it is now an American sauce.

Akai
Of course I was clearly talking about the Huy Fong sauces, whatever they chose to call them.
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Old 02-13-2013, 10:39 PM   #33
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.... before I started growing my own hot peppers.

freebird5825 what are the names of the hot peppers you have grown? do you grow the same ones each year or do you try new ones each year?

i have grown hot peppers for a couple of years, not super hots but i have eaten several different super hots and they call them that for a reason! in 2011 i grew long red slim cayenne, habanero and fatalii. in 2012 i grew long red slim cayenne, datil, tabasco and fatalii. for 2013 i'm just growing long red slim cayenne.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:57 AM   #34
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Love this thread!

I like Sambal Oelek. Makes a great chip dip. The Dutch like it. I first found it in a shop in a big windmill in Lynden, Washington (Dutch enclave). Salty, tomato-y, garlic-y, just hot enough for me. Can't find it in Baku.

Don't like the 'Rooster' sauce very much. Don't like the flavor.

Don't care for the traditional Tabasco either for the same reason. It is for the tourists. Tabasco does make a very nice chipotle sauce and a very nice jalapeno sauce today.

I go through Chalula pretty quick. Pequine and arbol peppers, IIRC.

There are several habanero sauces around now. I loved the ones I bought in Belize. Lots of flavor and plenty of heat.

Nando's will sell you their sauces from mild to wild. I like the hottest one. Lots of flavor. From red, bird peppers from Africa. Sometimes available in Baku. There is a Nando's in Dubai. Also in Knightsbridge (!).

Refrigerate everything. Bacteria can't taste the capsacin. Tabasco goes off exposed to air, even in the fridge if long enough. Changes color and taste.

I would love to hear about growing peppers. The climate is great for it here, but we are away too long at one time.

DW doesn't even like black pepper, so we have a lot of cooking that has zero spice. When she is away, I rock! One day I hope to make my own sauces. I made my own boudin in Calgary with local jalapenos, and a butternut squash and beans dish with habaneros that was wonderful.
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Old 02-14-2013, 01:32 PM   #35
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Hey NW-Bound--

Here's a suggestion for your Valentina Salsa Picante which I have used for a long time: add some lime or lemon juice to it. I add quite a bit, but you might want to experiment. It will perk up the flavor of the hot sauce even more. I see that some brands are now using this trick.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:51 PM   #36
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Sriracha Hot Sauce Catches Fire, Yet 'There's Only One Rooster' - Businessweek
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:41 AM   #37
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Read recently that Frito Lay is coming out with a Sriracha flavored potato chip.
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Old 07-27-2013, 06:04 PM   #38
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Just found on the Web another use for Rooster sauce: baked cicada!

A bit sweet, a little hot, garlicky, and crunchy! Yum!


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Old 08-11-2013, 02:40 PM   #39
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I found another brand of Sriracha sauce in the store the other day so I bought it. The brand is Badia known for Hispanic foods.

It is pretty spicy, more so than the other 2 brands. I was going to add it and some Habanero sauce to a dish but decided to hold off to gauge the heat. I was surprised, not really hot but more so than the other 2 I have.
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