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Old 12-24-2011, 08:45 PM   #21
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I have so been there. For the future, get this oil filter wrench:



Amazon.com: Lisle 63600 Oil Filter Tool: Automotive

You will love it so much that you will take it to bed with you.

Your problem isn't really that it's stuck, but that those silly plastic cap oil filters slip, perhaps because different manufacturers make the oil filters slightly differently.

When you replace it, get the Fram filters that have a rough surface, so that you can get it quite tight by hand (and don't tighten it further).


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Old 12-24-2011, 09:46 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl
I have so been there. For the future, get this oil filter wrench:

Amazon.com: Lisle 63600 Oil Filter Tool: Automotive
That is the exact tool I use, with six inch extension and socket wrench, on my Prius. It also works on my Miata, but that's a different set of skinned knuckles.
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Old 12-24-2011, 10:12 PM   #23
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Here's a question, Nords. When you get to the filter removal point, haven't you already drained the oil? That is, aren't you stuck unless you put in new oil?
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Old 12-24-2011, 10:33 PM   #24
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You need to try some peel and stick sandpaper...clean the filter off, cut and stick it on the filter, then try the filter wrench. I've done it with plain sandpaper, but if you have the peel and stick, it's much easier to use. I have a bunch of these for my random orbital sanding unit. Hope this helps.
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Old 12-25-2011, 12:13 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
Here's a question, Nords. When you get to the filter removal point, haven't you already drained the oil? That is, aren't you stuck unless you put in new oil?
A long long time ago, I used to drain the oil FIRST, and THEN remove the filter. Until a slippery oil filter slipped out of my hand and fell into the full catch pan, creating a big splash and a BIG mess! This was the largest oil spill, until the Exxon Valdez topped mine.

From then on, I remove and replace the filter FIRST, THEN drain the crankcase. So if I drop the old filter, it hits a pan that just has a few drips in it.
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second band style wrench
Old 12-25-2011, 07:48 AM   #26
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second band style wrench

Hello,

I have had great success with wrapping one layer of duct tape on the filter. Put steel wool on the duct tape then use the band type oil filter remover (you can also wedge steel wool under the band while it is on the filter). The steel wool really digs in. If doesn't work, bring it to the dealer.

Good Luck,

Wally
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Old 12-25-2011, 08:31 AM   #27
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This is the best one.

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forum...253-oil-filter
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Old 12-25-2011, 12:00 PM   #28
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Off topic, but responding to the original post: I'm a crappy backyard mechanic, and visit a lot of automotive/mechanical forums (just to see if I can learn anything), so I see it a lot, but that 'lefty-loosey'--'righty tighty' just drives me up a wall. It should be 'clockwise--to tighten' & 'counterclockwise--to loosen'. This is universal, whether you're turning a nut & bolt, oil filter, or a garden hose connection (unless you have an early 50's Chrysler vehicle that had reverse threads on the lugnuts on one side of the vehicle because they thought going down the road fast would loosen the lugnuts).
In response to Al's comment on Fram---that grip on the end of the filter is a great idea, but check out BITOG or some other forums, and you'll find that Fram isn't held in high regard like it used to be.
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Old 12-25-2011, 12:41 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Payin-the-Toll View Post
Off topic, but responding to the original post: I'm a crappy backyard mechanic, and visit a lot of automotive/mechanical forums (just to see if I can learn anything), so I see it a lot, but that 'lefty-loosey'--'righty tighty' just drives me up a wall. It should be 'clockwise--to tighten' & 'counterclockwise--to loosen'. This is universal, whether you're turning a nut & bolt, oil filter, or a garden hose connection (unless you have an early 50's Chrysler vehicle that had reverse threads on the lugnuts on one side of the vehicle because they thought going down the road fast would loosen the lugnuts).
In response to Al's comment on Fram---that grip on the end of the filter is a great idea, but check out BITOG or some other forums, and you'll find that Fram isn't held in high regard like it used to be.
The coating / grip in some oil filters interferes with some filter wrenches. Some LPG tanks have left hand threads.
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:15 PM   #30
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Success.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimsumkid View Post
Wrap your wrench with some duct tape or electrical tape in multiple places to add more grip to it
Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenJ View Post
If your filter socket wrench isn't a snug fit, wrapping some tape on the filter itself to take out the slack and prevent the slippage. Cloth electrician's friction tape comes to mind (if it' still being sold). It's worth a shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewood90712 View Post
If you have a 16" pair of channel lock pliers or a large pipe wrench will work if you have room. It will deform the shell , but better than the screwdriver skewer method. Duct tape to add friction as mentioned before helps sometimes too.
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Originally Posted by DAYDREAMER View Post
Here's another vote for the channel locks if you have the room. The filter on my tractor vibrates itself so tight there is no other way to remove other than channel locks. It is a little unnerving to deform the filter, but it always has come off.
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Originally Posted by wallygator69 View Post
I have had great success with wrapping one layer of duct tape on the filter. Put steel wool on the duct tape then use the band type oil filter remover (you can also wedge steel wool under the band while it is on the filter). The steel wool really digs in. If doesn't work, bring it to the dealer.
Duct tape. Of course duct tape. Thanks, I wish I'd thought of that!

A couple wraps of that (in the CCW direction to grip with the tools) and then my big 14"... Ford wrench, plus a couple of scraped knuckles to sanctify the ritual profanity incantations, and-- the filter moved about one millimeter. But it moved.

It took me almost two minutes to get it another 10 millimeters, and by then it was more rectangular than cylindrical (but still oil-tight). It was nearly two full freakin' turns between the wrench and a pair of channel-lock pliers before I'd consider it merely "hand tight".

The O-ring was crushed totally flat to the filter's metal rim, and they'd probably ground the filter metal into the engine casing until friction exceeded torque. I'm lucky they didn't gall the threads.

Of course now I'm wondering if the alleged "mechanic" had trouble sealing that filter to the engine casing's mating surface, but it seemed clean & smooth. I hope that the casing is tougher than the filter. The new filter's on finger-tight-plus-a-quarter-turn, and I'll leave a drip tray under the car for a couple days to see if it develops a leak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewood90712 View Post
Maybe post on priuschat . com for the prius geeks to give a shot at it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbll View Post
Oops, guess the 2005 has a canister instead of a cartridge insert type oil filter.
It's just a Toyota dealer's regular cylindrical oil filter, but I thought John's photo looked familiar. I decided to post here first (it was a mechanical problem, not only Priutical) and then the duct tape did the trick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
I have so been there.
Your problem isn't really that it's stuck, but that those silly plastic cap oil filters slip, perhaps because different manufacturers make the oil filters slightly differently.
When you replace it, get the Fram filters that have a rough surface, so that you can get it quite tight by hand (and don't tighten it further).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
Here's a question, Nords. When you get to the filter removal point, haven't you already drained the oil? That is, aren't you stuck unless you put in new oil?
I've never needed more than a cheap plastic filter cap and a bit of leverage from a torque wrench or a crescent wrench. Now that the first oil change is out of the way, I shouldn't need any specialized tools ever again. I like the grip on those Fram filters too.

And, yeah, we didn't encounter the filter problem until the oil was already drained, so this job took almost eight quarts of oil instead of just under four. But I buy it in five-quart jugs so we had plenty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by M Paquette View Post
No great ideas here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Payin-the-Toll View Post
Off topic, but responding to the original post: I'm a crappy backyard mechanic, and visit a lot of automotive/mechanical forums (just to see if I can learn anything), so I see it a lot, but that 'lefty-loosey'--'righty tighty' just drives me up a wall. It should be 'clockwise--to tighten' & 'counterclockwise--to loosen'. This is universal, whether you're turning a nut & bolt, oil filter, or a garden hose connection (unless you have an early 50's Chrysler vehicle that had reverse threads on the lugnuts on one side of the vehicle because they thought going down the road fast would loosen the lugnuts).
I think lefty-loosey and righty-tighty are a lot more memorable than the proper mechanic's references!

Right off the top of my head, the blades on rotary saws are secured by reverse-threaded screws. Of course Easy-Out screw/bolt extractors are reverse-threaded. I'm sure other posters will remember more reverse-thread situations. Luckily the Navy mnemonic for those situations is "righty-roosey", so I'm usually not confused for long.

Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Nords, I seen to recall an incident with DW and DD where you made a comment about me being cheap.
Kettle to pot: pay for an oil change.
I'm sorry. Again. I'm going to be apologizing for that offhanded comment for a long time, aren't I?

I don't mind the money-- it's the hassle factor of getting on the mechanic's appointment calendar, sitting in the waiting room, and then having him say "Eh, brah, no problem-- no girly hands for me!"
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:21 PM   #31
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Glad you finally got it off! (Yes, I'm talking about your oil filter...)
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I'm sorry. Again. I'm going to be apologizing for that offhanded comment for a long time, aren't I?
Once again, no apology necessary. It was true - and funny!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post
I don't mind the money-- it's the hassle factor of getting on the mechanic's appointment calendar, sitting in the waiting room, and then having him say "Eh, brah, no problem-- no girly hands for me!"
Do what I do in those situations. Get the DW to take it in...
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:33 PM   #32
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No, I'm not going to puncture the filter with a screwdriver and try to remove it that way.
Oh, well, there goes my idea. I've done that once or twice, although not in the past 15-20 years. Big channel locks have been used, too.

Now that I have a house I may start changing my own oil again.

Can you skip the storebought filter and filter the oil using duct tape alone?
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Old 12-25-2011, 06:50 PM   #33
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Can you skip the storebought filter and filter the oil using duct tape alone?
Great idea!

I guess that would depend on your definition of "success"... you'd have to keep pouring oil in the top of the engine faster than it leaked through the duct tape. But it'd be filtered!
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Old 12-25-2011, 07:42 PM   #34
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This is the oil filter wrench I use after my other oil filter wrenches have failed to remove a filter. It's cheap but remarkably good quality. I've had mine for several years and I have not broken it and it always removes those stubborn filters.

Locking Oil Filter Wrench
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Old 12-25-2011, 07:58 PM   #35
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I assume you know about this forum...
PriusChat Forums
Lots of info there.
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Old 12-25-2011, 08:05 PM   #36
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Nords, it always amazed me why people think an oil filter has to be torqued to 150 foot pounds After almost 30 years in the automotive business I have seen it all. I also feel your pain. Simple things were the ones that always got me
I found that the 14 flute, 65 mm end cap style oil filter wrench to work best on one like you have in case you want to buy one for future use. I use this one Toyota 90915-YZZF2 and it works perfect. I have just about any tool known to man in my shop but sometimes I get whooped trying to do something simple
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Old 12-26-2011, 07:58 AM   #37
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Glad you finally got it off--Success is sweet. So, if I'm loosening something, and I'm looking at it and start at 6 o'clock for a reference point for lefty-loosey, then I'm actually tightening the darn thing.
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Old 12-26-2011, 12:18 PM   #38
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Come to think of it, my tractor oil filters use O-rings. Wonder if this is the root cause of the problem having so little surface area to prevent the filter from continue to tighten itself via vibration to the point of impossible removal. My truck (desiel) uses a very large filter, but the spherical rubber gasket has large flat surfaces not an o-ring. I have never had an issue removing this larger filter from my truck. When i install my tractor filter, because of all the problems i've had removing filters, i gingerly tighten it only by hand and never give the extra twist. But even so, it is always impossible to remove.

Hope your next removal goes as planned, but i'm thinking, you will have the same experience.
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Old 12-26-2011, 12:45 PM   #39
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oil filter tightness - PriusChat Forums

Just found this on a prius website. Evidently there is some sort of clip that prevents your filter froms spinning. Might want to read.
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Old 12-26-2011, 02:15 PM   #40
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The older Prius models use a conventional fiber oil filter in a metal can, that threads onto a small connector centered in a larger circular plate that the filter's O-ring seals against. It's the sort of filter every shade tree mechanic is familiar with.

The 2010 Prius and some Lexus models use a cartridge filter. This is the fiber (paper) filter element, mounted in a reusable cover or canister. Changing it is a little different. That's what the priuschat.com thread is talking about. When changing the filter on these models, you will need a torque wrench. The proper torque is important for getting the O-ring seated and properly compressed, while avoiding damage to the filter cover and mounting.

You can get all fancy with a $45 torque wrench:
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...1&blockType=G1

Or just go with a $20 torsion beam wrench:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...&blockType=G11

I find that there is enough in the way of metal on plastic and aluminum in modern hardware that these wrenches are very handy to have around.
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