Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Time Poor vs Time Rich
Old 03-01-2019, 12:33 PM   #1
Administrator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 28,866
Time Poor vs Time Rich

Here’s a paper that looks at levels of happiness and life satisfaction and assesses the impact of discretionary time, both not enough and too much. The conclusion of this study is both extremes are not good. Makes sense.

I do like the concept and termonology of “Time Rich” and “Time Poor” and think it fits well here at E-R Forum. The paper is here The abstract
Quote:
Many people living in modern society feel like they don’t have enough time and are constantly searching for more. But, is having limited discretionary time actually detrimental? And, can there be downsides of having too much free time? In two largescale datasets spanning 35,375 Americans, we test the relationship between the amount of discretionary time individuals have and their life satisfaction. We find and internally replicate a negative quadratic relationship between discretionary time and life satisfaction. These results show that while having too little time is indeed linked to lower levels of life satisfaction, having more time does not continually translate to greater life satisfaction, and can even reduce it.
__________________

MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 03-01-2019, 01:11 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,477
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Here’s a paper that looks at levels of happiness and life satisfaction and assesses the impact of discretionary time, both not enough and too much. The conclusion of this study is both extremes are not good. Makes sense.

I do like the concept and termonology of “Time Rich” and “Time Poor” and think it fits well here at E-R Forum. The paper is here The abstract
Yeah, that makes sense. One thing that I've found interesting about life is that I've always seemed to have either plenty of free time or plenty of money, but never both at the same time.

Of course, once I had kids the free time and money both went down dramatically
__________________

Hamlet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2019, 03:55 PM   #3
Moderator Emeritus
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 41,973
From the abstract of this article, I gather that he is looking at the relationship between how much discretionary time a person has currently, and current life satisfaction.

If that is correct, then my own life experience does not confirm what he is saying.

1) I have never even approached being as happy as I am now, in previous years. Yet right now I have a maximum of discretionary "me time" since I am retired and have no job, classes, dependents, pets, or other responsibilities. I am free as a cloud. Maximum happiness, maximum discretionary time.

2) My most miserable years were my childhood, when I probably had the least discretionary time of my life (due to unusual circumstances).

So I guess my response to him would be, "huh? What exactly do you MEAN (you effing doofus!)"
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2019, 04:53 PM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Sojourner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,040
For me, the more interesting thing to study would be the relationship between the amount of "idle" discretionary time vs. "personally engaging/productive" discretionary time. I think we all know that someone with 16 years per day of discretionary time could be highly fulfilled or highly bored, depending on what they do during that time. If they spend the time watching crappy daytime TV or scrolling through endless Facebook or Instagram posts, etc., then they're probably going to feel pretty unfulfilled. If they spend that time doing things that are personally rewarding and fulfilling—like honing their amateur photography skills, or building a bird house to put up in the backyard—then they are likely to feel fairly happy and report greater life satisfaction. So, IMHO, it's not simply the raw amount of discretionary time, it's what someone does with it.
Sojourner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2019, 05:23 PM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Tampa
Posts: 3,445
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
From the abstract of this article, I gather that he is looking at the relationship between how much discretionary time a person has currently, and current life satisfaction.

If that is correct, then my own life experience does not confirm what he is saying.

1) I have never even approached being as happy as I am now, in previous years. Yet right now I have a maximum of discretionary "me time" since I am retired and have no job, classes, dependents, pets, or other responsibilities. I am free as a cloud. Maximum happiness, maximum discretionary time.

2) My most miserable years were my childhood, when I probably had the least discretionary time of my life (due to unusual circumstances).

So I guess my response to him would be, "huh? What exactly do you MEAN (you effing doofus!)"
+1 on point #1.
Free time makes the retirement. We can go all day with doing nothing and not be bored.
__________________
TGIM
Dtail is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Poor habits lead to poor future~an old concept mickeyd Other topics 0 05-29-2006 10:24 AM
"Getting Rich: The Poor Man's Guide" frayne Young Dreamers 8 05-23-2006 01:08 PM
Why Homeowners Get Rich and Renters Stay Poor Jay_Gatsby FIRE and Money 16 02-17-2006 10:33 PM
Rich/Poor Gap laurence Other topics 8 06-15-2005 03:54 PM
Rich Dad Poor Dad series laurence Other topics 1 02-23-2005 06:21 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:10 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.