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Old 06-08-2008, 12:44 PM   #21
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You know, reading these posts, it seems that nuke guys are a dime a dozen. Either that, or they all somehow end up at the FIRE website.
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Old 06-08-2008, 04:00 PM   #22
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Or when you discover the sailboat that sonar couldn't hear.

We managed erm... While conducting deep sea oceanographic research, a 637 class submarine became entangled in a fishing net for about 45 minutes, giving some poor trawler crew a real thrill. Due to operational considerations the boat never surfaced, but once it had maneuvered free the trawler was verified to not be in distress...

Fun times.
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Old 06-08-2008, 04:21 PM   #23
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There needs to be a thread dedicated to sea stories like that.
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Old 06-08-2008, 04:34 PM   #24
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My sister's first husband went AWOL from the sub fleet; I guess I understand why.
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Old 06-08-2008, 04:51 PM   #25
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We get a lot of that here. One boat had 6 people go UA within a few months. They come back before 30 days so they're not classified as AWOL thinking they'll just get kicked out of the Navy. Imagine their surprise when most are right back on the boat within a day or three.
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Old 06-08-2008, 07:16 PM   #26
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We get a lot of that here. One boat had 6 people go UA within a few months. They come back before 30 days so they're not classified as AWOL thinking they'll just get kicked out of the Navy. Imagine their surprise when most are right back on the boat within a day or three.
So what you are saying is that they are going to put them in a cage they can not escape from, not let them see the sun, have them do hard labor as punishment for leaving...

jail would be better
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Old 06-09-2008, 12:05 AM   #27
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There needs to be a thread dedicated to sea stories like that.
I don't miss the briefs on collisions & groundings, mishaps, or things that shouldn't have been tried on station, either...

However if you're jonesing for some sea stories, you could try these discussion boards:
Military.com
United States Navy - Together We Served
RiggedForDive.com :: Index
SailorBob.com :: Index
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Old 06-09-2008, 07:38 AM   #28
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Or when you discover the sailboat that sonar couldn't hear.

We managed erm... While conducting deep sea oceanographic research, a 637 class submarine became entangled in a fishing net for about 45 minutes, giving some poor trawler crew a real thrill. Due to operational considerations the boat never surfaced, but once it had maneuvered free the trawler was verified to not be in distress...

Fun times.
We had a similar story on a Med Run back in 1985. We were of the coast of an Afican country (rhymes with tibia) and got caught in a fishing buoy. We went from PD down to a certain depth multiple times to get that buoy we were dragging off. The Captain was going nuts blaming the Officer of the Deck. Not sure why but he had to blame someone.

We talked about that story for the rest of the deployment.
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Old 06-09-2008, 01:09 PM   #29
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We had a similar story on a Med Run back in 1985. We were of the coast of an Afican country (rhymes with tibia) and got caught in a fishing buoy. We went from PD down to a certain depth multiple times to get that buoy we were dragging off. The Captain was going nuts blaming the Officer of the Deck. Not sure why but he had to blame someone.
Well, first I hope the CO wasn't J.D. Von Suskil. Yikes.

Second, I wonder if the buoy was marked on the charts. Or if it was visible through the scope.

When I was at SUBPAC I'd see those SITREPs at least once a quarter. Fishing buoys are one of the world's most deadly anti-submarine weapons...
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Old 08-19-2008, 05:11 PM   #30
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As a relative newcomer to this web site, I'm still sorting through some of the military threads.

I was a restricted line officer whose job, during several tours, was to spend a lot of time TAD (temporary duty) to both surface ships and subs.

I was always aware, on subs, that I was with folks who had been through unbelievably rigorous training that I know I never could have completed. A few particular things I remember:
- on my first trip (I was a "trainee" under the tutelage of another officer before I could go it alone) we had left port in the AM. By dinner time, we were far enough out to sea that we were submerged. Dinner in the wardroom was surf 'n turf (steak and lobster). I had always heard that subs were the best feeders in the Navy and this meal made me think they were. After dinner I was watching the movie when there was a loud BANG! from somewhere on the boat. All the officers, except for my trainer and me, dashed from the wardroom to their assigned locations. The word was passed to don OBA's (oxygen breathing apparatus which allowed you to breath if the air in the contained environment of the sub.) I was thinking, "Jeesh, my first day on a sub and it's going to be the Thresher all over again." As it turned out, it was a relatively minor problem, the rupture of a membrane in the CO2 generator which set off a chemical reaction that caused the bang. Quickly fixed and back to normal, but a little unsettling.
- on my first trip on my own, we pulled into port and mail was brought aboard. Whoever was sorting out the official Navy mail (as opposed to personal mail) in the wardroom announced that the newest/latest Navy pub/manual on water chemistry had arrived. In no time, one officer said, "Can I have it first?" A few others immediately lined up to get their names on the list. I don't know if there was a new qualification coming up which required the information in the manual, but it sounded to me like my college buddies when a new Playboy came into the dorm - everyone wanting to get it first.
- finally, a conclusion I took away from all my TAD's: I would rather go on liberty with surface guys but rather go to war with submariners.
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Old 08-20-2008, 03:53 PM   #31
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As it turned out, it was a relatively minor problem, the rupture of a membrane in the CO2 generator which set off a chemical reaction that caused the bang.
I'll bet what I really meant was "oxygen generator." Proof positive that I ain't no nuke; a nuke wouldn't have made that mistake.
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Old 08-20-2008, 04:36 PM   #32
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I don't know if there was a new qualification coming up which required the information in the manual, but it sounded to me like my college buddies when a new Playboy came into the dorm - everyone wanting to get it first.
We They just wanted to read the articles.

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- finally, a conclusion I took away from all my TAD's: I would rather go on liberty with surface guys but rather go to war with submariners.
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I hate remembering
Old 10-09-2008, 10:52 PM   #33
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I hate remembering

40+ for 12 weeks, living on lake schetedy, S5W S3G Core 3, 6 hours on 2 hours maintenance (bilge diving), Catch a movie as CAT, or rack dive for four tobe awaken in 4 hours as the oncoming watch Drill Monitor.

Glory be as EWS I went 4 section mid shift and did back to back Drill monitor for the ORSE Teams...

I still have terrible night sweats... and its been ten years...:confused:
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Old 10-09-2008, 11:08 PM   #34
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No one dies today

[quote=Nords;664823] I have a hard time relaxing and enjoying the sight of just about anything. I usually mentally assess its material condition and its readiness-- even at the beach. I can't turn my brain off and I usually don't fall asleep until I'm exhausted, yet I'll twitch wide-eyed awake in the wee hours of the morning.

But I'm recovering.

BTW It helps to realize no-one will die today if i dont get my reports in.
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Old 10-10-2008, 03:43 AM   #35
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Just the thought of serving on a submarine gets my claustrophobia up and running.After doing a few walkthroughs of subs in naval displays/museums i have no clue as to how you can spend months couped up on these things,if some one told me that i would be spending the next 5 months on a sub and shooting myself was the only other option i would be hard pressed to make a descision.
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Old 10-11-2008, 02:14 AM   #36
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Just the thought of serving on a submarine gets my claustrophobia up and running. After doing a few walkthroughs of subs in naval displays/museums i have no clue as to how you can spend months couped up on these things,if some one told me that i would be spending the next 5 months on a sub and shooting myself was the only other option i would be hard pressed to make a descision.
Funny you should mention that.

One day we got underway for a six-month deployment. I checked the chart that night before hitting my rack and saw that we were going west ahead of schedule.

When I got up a few hours later for my morning watch, I discovered that we were racing east as fast as we could and that I'd be taking care of a personnel transfer later that morning.

It turned out that one of the crew was suffering an abrupt attack of appendicitis. That's bad enough but "fortunately" it happens frequently enough that we're all accustomed to dealing with it.

However in his case it turned out that for most of his career (he was easily at least 16 years into it by then) he'd been dealing with claustrophobia. Despite his phobia the attraction of sub pay was so strong that he would handle the problem by staying up until he was absolutely exhausted and then crashing for a few hours until the fear awoke him. Ironically, in a casualty he was one of the coolest and most collected individuals I've ever served with-- able to do three things at once while still keeping up morale and helping serve up his share of black humor. I can only imagine what claustrophobia did to his mental & physical health during "routine" operations, but when he was incapacitated with appendicitis and doped up on the related antibiotics/painkillers he was really in a bad way. Our corpsman was riding the ragged edge of keeping him conscious to monitor his condition while trying to dope him enough to get him to settle down. We had to strap him into a collapsible stretcher and maneuver him out through the hatch (25" in diameter, at least a 10-foot vertical trip) with a hoist line to get him topside. And then we spun around and hauled our assets back to WestPac at speeds considerably "greater than 25 knots".

His appendix was removed with no issues, he was medically disqualified from submarine duty, and he finished his career on submarine tenders & shore maintenance facilities with no further problems. He's doing fine today, but I'm sure he spends all his time in wide-open spaces and lets someone else clean bilges crawl under cars for oil changes.

I know that I tell a lot of sea stories, but most of them are considered run-of-the-mill for a typical submarine career. However even among submariners this one generates a long period of silence followed by a couple introspective comments along the line of "No sh!t" and "Gimme another beer, please..."

I have to admit that when I was on sea duty I was totally oblivious (or blissfully ignorant) to the hundreds of pounds of sea pressure squeezing every inch of the hull at every moment. I didn't really mind having to contort into small enclosed spaces with 100+ of my new closest personal friends, along with all their personal idiosyncracies and varying standards of humor/hygiene, and even today my spouse assures me that I still have no concept of personal space. It was considered a weapons officer's rite of passage to crawl 20 feet into a 21" diameter torpedo tube to cut loose a torpedo-guidance wire that was trapped in the muzzle door, allowing an invigorating spray of seawater to wash over you through the fouled seating surfaces as you tried to cut the wire and not your fingers-- I was more concerned about having my manhood impugned than I was about running out of breathing air. But every year or two we'd get someone who'd never really had to deal with a certain set of shipboard conditions (like a real no-foolin' fire or flooding casualty) or who simply got pushed a little past their limits once too many times. I got one of my jobs because my predecessor couldn't handle the incessant bureaucracy stress of caring for nuclear weapons-- when he started coughing up blood, no one objected to him quitting.

The Army has recently discovered antidepressants for keeping their troops on the front lines, but the submarine force has been doing it for years...
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Old 12-04-2008, 10:30 PM   #37
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I stumbled on this forum googling about the S7G (MARF) reactor. Gumby, what was MARF like when you were there? Did they still call it "Flushing the reactor" when it was scrammed? Also, did the "grapefruit" propulsion control unit still work (the thing to "burn up the energy of the propulsion plant").

I was one of the first five or six enlisted at MARF when it was being built having just qualified at D1G as a Reactor Operator. Since I was the first RO qual'd in my class I was asked to stay as an instructor and then got transferred to MARF--the best thing that happened to me. One thing that was really interesting is that we could spend hours in the reactor compartment for hours since there was no reactor yet and no radiation to worry about.

I watched the plant go through initial fuel loading, testing of all components, etc. Also, because of the unique reactor design we had different reactor control equipment which we tested and found problems with--I recommended some changes to the equipment which was followed. And when it was time to take the reactor critical for the first time, I was the RO on watch then. And was also on watch to scram the reactor for the first time at 50% and 100% power.

I was transferred from MARF in May of 1977 before the first training class was run through there so I never had a chance to actually teach students, just new instructors who were assigned to MARF. I headed to Charleston to the USS Tunny (SSN682) where I was promoted to E6, qualified subs and qualified as EWS at the end of our first cruise (after we failed an ORSE exam which was followed up with two more failures--had to be a record!)

After the boat was transferred to Honolulu I got a transfer to the USS R.E. Lee (SSBN682-Gold) as the Reactor Controls Division LPO in late 1978 and then completed four cruises before getting out, having been selected for E-7. I went on to college at RPI near Ballston Spa, got a degree in Computer Engineering and went to work at HP since 1985. Kinda miss the challenge of running a reactor on patrol.

Steve
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Old 12-05-2008, 02:22 PM   #38
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You guys are amazing. The only submarine I've ever been on was the Torsk in Baltimore harbor (WWII diesel) and left thinking "Those guys had big brass ones".

Apparently it's worse than I thought.
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Old 12-05-2008, 08:05 PM   #39
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Old 12-05-2008, 08:20 PM   #40
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I ended up in Ft Collins 'cause it had much nicer weather than upstate NY, which doesn't take much. And was affordable!

I think we named it the Grapefruit because both halves were like emptied grapefruit halves with the membranes still in place. I don't remember if it was how it was described to us by the construction folks or if I or one of the other original crew came up with the name for the "thing". I do remember being the operator of it many times during our original testing, adjusting the water level/flow to manage the temperature of the water.

Those were fun days and amazing at how the Navy would turn over the operations of multi-million doller equipment to 21 yo's! But I would say that we proved ourselves more than up to the task.

Best regards,
Steve
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