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Old 06-23-2012, 11:38 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
I have used several money management applications and they have been abandoned. First, was Managing Your Money which was sold to a bank, if I remember correctly, and then abandoned. Next, was MS Money, which MS stopped supporting. So, today, I make my own Excel spreadsheets. I figure it will be a long time before MS abandons Excel.
The exact same progression I had. I absolutely loved Managing Your Money and used it all the way from when it was DOS. It was one of the very first programs that I bought for my first computer.

Then, when it went away I migrated to MS Money which was good (although never held the place in my heart as MYM).

When it went away I did some spreadsheets but then I switched to an Excel based program called YNAB which stands for You Need A Budget.

Several years later it is no longer Excel based and its new version YNAB 4 comes out this Tuesday. I actually love this program as much as I loved MYM and really do commend it to anyone interested in budgeting.

Personal Budget Software - Finance Software for Windows & Mac
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Old 06-23-2012, 03:12 PM   #22
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Yet another reason it is unlikely I'll be an apple guy any time soon. Upgrading computers or fixing dead components in computers certainly has saved us tons of money and extended the useful lives of our computers.

Examples include laptop ram upgrades, hard drive replacements, battery and keyboard replacements. Desktop video card upgrades (more power and dual monitor support), ram replacement (1/2 the ram just died last week, replaced on ebay for $17 shipped - without the ram the computer would be almost obsolete today), hard drive, fan, etc.

A big benefit of being able to replace or upgrade components on your own, aside from cost savings is time savings. I have lots of programs and data on my computers. The operating systems and programs have all been configured and customized just like I want them, and not having to buy a completely new computer means saving many hours of installing and updating programs.

I wonder when the Apple memo outlining the additional revenues and profits that non-upgradability will generate. After all, if you are facing a $200 battery replacement (and possibly other expensive replacements/upgrades) or $1000-2000 to just buy a new system, which do you think many consumers opt for? Even though I have never seen an apple product I would buy, I love their business models (as a shareholder via my index funds). Profit maximization to the max!
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Old 06-23-2012, 05:30 PM   #23
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I wonder when the Apple memo outlining the additional revenues and profits that non-upgradability will generate. After all, if you are facing a $200 battery replacement (and possibly other expensive replacements/upgrades) or $1000-2000 to just buy a new system, which do you think many consumers opt for? Even though I have never seen an apple product I would buy, I love their business models (as a shareholder via my index funds). Profit maximization to the max!
I don't think you'll find that memo. This came up in some of the meetings I attended back when I was working. (former Apple engineer in recovery...) In general, components that were upgraded or replaced by only a very small part of the user base were candidates for becoming replaceable only as part of a larger module in-store or at a repair facility.

A keyboard, for example, might be improved to the point where it was very unlikely to fail over the life of a machine, at which point the keyboard might be integrated in the case top along with the trackpad, making the field replacement unit a case top assembly rather than just the keyboard, so as to reduce the case top thickness and number of connectors run between the case top and main board. (Replaced case tops would be routed back to rework, where useable parts could be reclaimed for factory refurbishment, and otherwise recycled properly.)

The goal in redesign that removed user replaceable pieces was normally an improved user experience, in longer battery life, reduced weight, or more comfortable form factor. Replacement components and assemblies were generally priced at cost+handling. Yeah, even those expensive batteries at 4 times the cost of a no-name replacement from Amazon.com. (having a no-name battery stop taking a charge after 6 months, or even better blow its content over my desk pointed out the difference to me... I'm still finding lithium salts in odd corners of my office.)

The integrated batteries found in iGadgets and the laptops typically allow about 30% more capacity than a removable battery. The extra capacity comes from replacing the battery well and connector in the case, and the puncture resistant battery housing and connector with more battery. That is, with the battery sealed inside the machine case, all those extra plastic bits needed to protect the consumer can be eliminated and replaced with more battery capacity.

I never heard anyone talk about using this as a lever to raise profits from repair or parts sales.

I suspect the folks here at ER.org are a bit unusual in how long they keep equipment. (I know I am!) The average consumer out there in the mid to high end market where Apple sells tends to replace desktop systems around every 3.6 years, and laptops every 3 years. (I'm using a 5 year old desktop, and 8 year old laptop. Weirdo...)

OT Fun Read for Marketing Math Weenies: http://www.columbia.edu/~brg2114/files/gordon_cpu.pdf
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