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Wall Anchor Question
Old 12-27-2014, 01:08 PM   #1
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Wall Anchor Question

I want to install brackets in drywall to support drapery rods. No studs are located in the right places, so I'm using the small plastic wall anchors supplied with the drapery hardware. I watched YouTube videos, which show wall anchors being easily slipped into previously drilled pilot holes.

The instructions with the drapery hardware, say to use a 3/16 drill bit to drill a pilot hole for the anchors, so that is what I did. However, the hole made by the 3/16 is too small to insert the anchor. Before drilling a larger hole, I wanted to ask if there's some other way I should go about this?

Thanks,

Amethyst
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:10 PM   #2
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The anchors are designed to fit very tight in the wall, so a light tap with a hammer is likely all you need.
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:23 PM   #3
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For me, when there is no way even after lightly tapping with a hammer, the anchors still do not fit, I use the drill bit to slowly sand around the hole to make the hole a little bigger with the goal to sand off take off just enough so the anchor fits.

Sand a little, try to tap in anchor, sand a little, try again. Repeat as needed.

If that doesn't work, I sometimes look for another anchor that I may have around that fits.
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:28 PM   #4
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Behind our walls lie dozens of anchors, molly bolts, and toggle bolts, whose falls were preceded and followed by many a swear word. Good luck.
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:33 PM   #5
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I have much better results with an expanding wall anchor. Get the size for your wall thickness. I have a kit of anchors that comes with a small wrench to help you tighten the anchor for maximum hold. Then you back out the screw and attach your bracket.
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPatrick View Post
The anchors are designed to fit very tight in the wall, so a light tap with a hammer is likely all you need.
Exactly ! Most of the plastic anchors are designed to compress a little when tapping into the hole, and will firmly grip the drywall once installed.

This video shows the drilling and tapping in method very well.

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Old 12-28-2014, 05:03 AM   #7
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Some anchors are included by manufacturers who really couldn't care less about selling useless crap to customers, like this anchor:

http://www.publichardware.com/galler...75_200x128.jpg

If that is what is included, then definitely go to the hardware store and buy better anchors. Anchors should taper, and should have a lip on the end.

http://www.theindustrialdepot.com/up...CAL-SCREW4.jpg

Personally, I am very judicious about how many things I hang with anchors. Of all the ways to hang things on the wall, they're among the least long-lasting and most damaging, in my experience. Hate 'em.
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Old 12-28-2014, 06:18 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by freebird5825 View Post
Exactly ! Most of the plastic anchors are designed to compress a little when tapping into the hole, and will firmly grip the drywall once installed.

This video shows the drilling and tapping in method very well.

This is an excellent reference. A decent drywall anchor is OK for a light item, but I'd use a Molly bolt or a toggle bolt if you have any concerns about the weight of the item you're hanging (both shown in video). Best of luck...simple project.

If you stay with anchors, you want the hole to be a little too small. When you carefully tap the anchor flush with a hammer, it helps lock it in place. If the hole is big enough that the anchor slides in easily, it'll probably pull out shortly after you hang something from it.
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Old 12-28-2014, 06:27 AM   #9
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If you are hanging drapery rods, you should be able to find a stud.

There is a king stud on each side of a window, or patio door, almost by definition. There is also a jack stud that holds the header above the window or door. So you should have ~3" of stud to find on each side of the thing you are hanging drapes over. And the header will be at least a 2x4 above it, but likely a 2x6 or 2x8.

If you have to use a wall anchor, buy decent ones. Drapes get pulled on by kids, cats climb them, and they might be heavy. If you open/close them every day, they get a lot of stress and movement on the anchor.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:44 AM   #10
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My (excellent) local hardware store swears the self-tapping anchors (you turn the plastic part into the wall first, then the screw goes in, no drilling) are the best, but for heavy things I use these (sizes vary based on load) Amazon.com: Toggler 50425 Toggle Anchor BB Hollow Wall Anchors 1/4"-20" Pack Of 10: Home Improvement. They are unbeatable.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:58 AM   #11
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My (excellent) local hardware store swears the self-tapping anchors (you turn the plastic part into the wall first, then the screw goes in, no drilling) are the best, but for heavy things I use these (sizes vary based on load) Amazon.com: Toggler 50425 Toggle Anchor BB Hollow Wall Anchors 1/4"-20" Pack Of 10: Home Improvement. They are unbeatable.
The above referenced toggles are one of the best for dry wall. But like Senator said, there are studs on both sides of the window frame and one above it.
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Old 12-28-2014, 11:27 AM   #12
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Wow - I didn't know that drapes could be hung by brackets only secured to drywall. No way our drapes could be supported by drywall anchors alone.They would have fallen down years ago. Like Senator said, there should be 2 studs on each side of the window and header above, so there should be some solid material there to fasten them to.
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Old 12-28-2014, 01:10 PM   #13
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Does anyone have experience anchoring in hollow portions of thin vinyl doors? The previous owners tried to use a regular anchor, and for one of the screws there was simply nothing inside to hold it in place.
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Old 12-28-2014, 01:37 PM   #14
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There are, in fact, studs about a foot inside the window frames on both sides. (It's a 3-window spread, about 100 inches wide). These are not helpful spots, because the draperies are grommet-style, and the brackets/rod holder impede the grommets sliding over the rod. Murphy was lurking, apparently, when I ordered the drapes.

Anyway, I put in 3 brackets using the wall anchors, and all seems secure. These drapes don't get closed often, and there isn't one of those pull-string arrangements, which tempt people to yank on them and pull the whole business out of the wall.

A.

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The above referenced toggles are one of the best for dry wall. But like Senator said, there are studs on both sides of the window frame and one above it.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:33 PM   #15
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Using the standard plastic insert kind of anchors always requires a small hole and a tap-in to get a good grip.

I've successfully used something called a "Pop Toggle" plastic anchor. They are holding up my heavy towel rods with no issues. I like these anchors. They are especially useful if you accidentally made the hole for the small anchors too big.

That said, nothing like a stud if you can find it.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:03 PM   #16
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My (excellent) local hardware store swears the self-tapping anchors (you turn the plastic part into the wall first, then the screw goes in, no drilling) are the best, but for heavy things...
I believe you meant this type of "E-Z Ancor". I have not used it with anything as heavy as a window curtain, but for bathroom towel bars and bathroom hooks, it holds up well. It is stronger than the usual plastic insert, yet the hole it makes is not hard to patch up if you change your mind and unscrew it from the wall.

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Old 12-29-2014, 05:34 AM   #17
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Using the standard plastic insert kind of anchors always requires a small hole and a tap-in to get a good grip.
Thank you, that is the method I used, based on an earlier poster's advice.

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That said, nothing like a stud if you can find it.
As my momma always said.
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Old 12-29-2014, 11:55 AM   #18
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Does anyone have experience anchoring in hollow portions of thin vinyl doors? The previous owners tried to use a regular anchor, and for one of the screws there was simply nothing inside to hold it in place.
Is the situation such that you can go straight through the door and use an appropriate sized carriage bolt and nut?
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Old 12-29-2014, 12:09 PM   #19
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Unfortunately not. The rack is inside-mounted, so going through the door would mean the nut would be visible in the room.
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Old 12-29-2014, 01:05 PM   #20
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These are the expanding hollow wall anchors I referred to.
They come in different sizes, depending on the thickness of your wall and the bolt.

Wall Anchors - How to Fasten Objects to a Wall
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