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WD-40, is there something else to use instead?
Old 08-25-2019, 12:14 PM   #1
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WD-40, is there something else to use instead?

I guess I grew up using WD-40 to put as a thin film on metal garden tools to keep them from rusting after washing the mud off of them, but maybe I'm an old fuddy-duddy. Is there something that is more appropriate nowadays in 2019 to use instead? Thanks!
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:23 PM   #2
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Old erl from the drain pan is mo betta. WD40 is too light.
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Old 08-25-2019, 01:16 PM   #3
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Fluid Film is a popular antirust oil.
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Old 08-25-2019, 02:21 PM   #4
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Any motor oil or something like 3-2-1 oil. WD-40 really is too light. It's a great penetrating oil for a myriad of jobs, but it's not a good lubricating oil or coating / preservative oil.

It's also great for heavy cleaning jobs. like removing old commode wax rings. Seriously, then clean the WD-40 with traditional household cleaner.
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Old 08-25-2019, 02:21 PM   #5
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For many years I used wd-40 to lube my bicycle chains. Turns out it is a degreaser and actually removes lubricant from the chain. It is ok to use to clean a chain, but should be followed with some type of lube.
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Old 08-25-2019, 02:28 PM   #6
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Or, you could "blow that dough" and buy stainless steel garden tools.
For example: https://www.homedepot.com/p/English-...R490/207144861
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Old 08-25-2019, 02:41 PM   #7
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This. My Dad, a champion DIYer, used 3-in-1 oil to lubricate/desqueak most things around the house; never used WD40 except to open stuck things (it is a solvent, not a lubricant). I use a silicone spray with Teflon for windows and doors.

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For many years I used wd-40 to lube my bicycle chains. Turns out it is a degreaser and actually removes lubricant from the chain. It is ok to use to clean a chain, but should be followed with some type of lube.
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Old 08-25-2019, 03:05 PM   #8
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Thanks for the mention of FluidFilm which I will have to look for at places I shop.

I am not using WD-40 as a lubricant.
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Old 08-25-2019, 04:31 PM   #9
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What problem are you trying to solve? Is the WD-40 not working?

Boeshield is better. It deposits a waxy film designed to protect for long term storage but it's not as widely available as WD-40 and its clones. Brownells also sells several lubes and rust protectors: https://www.brownells.com/search/ind...tion&ksubmit=y CRC has lots of magic potions as well: https://www.crcindustries.com/produc...enetrants.html
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Old 08-25-2019, 05:36 PM   #10
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There's a corrosion protection form of WD40 , but I understand the gold standard is fluid film (also available through Amazon)
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:24 PM   #11
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What problem are you trying to solve? Is the WD-40 not working?
The problem to solve: I used a shovel, pruning shears, loppers, hammer, PVC cutters, etc while repairing my underground water line. They all got muddy and wet. I hosed them off to remove the mud. If I let them air dry, then any steel parts including swivel points will be coated with rust.

Spraying with WD-40 and wiping off with a rag is what I usually use, but only because it's what I've always done. Spraying is convenient and the lack of viscosity lets the fluid go everywhere. So I thought that I'd ask if there was something different that I should be doing. I don't want residue left that will attract any significant amount of dust or pollen.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:32 PM   #12
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For many years I used wd-40 to lube my bicycle chains. Turns out it is a degreaser and actually removes lubricant from the chain. It is ok to use to clean a chain, but should be followed with some type of lube.
So did I early on because it was so easy to apply. After my first rainy season of commuting I learned about liquid graphite.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:40 PM   #13
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A comprehensive corrosion test where WD-40 Specialist did very well. Fluid Film also included.



Comprehensive Corrosion Test: 46 Products Compared | Day At The Range
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:43 PM   #14
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I guess I'm lazy when it comes to garden tools. I just use them, wash & dry them and put them away. They rust over time but are rather inexpensive to replace.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:44 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
The problem to solve: I used a shovel, pruning shears, loppers, hammer, PVC cutters, etc while repairing my underground water line. They all got muddy and wet. I hosed them off to remove the mud. If I let them air dry, then any steel parts including swivel points will be coated with rust.

Spraying with WD-40 and wiping off with a rag is what I usually use, but only because it's what I've always done. Spraying is convenient and the lack of viscosity lets the fluid go everywhere. So I thought that I'd ask if there was something different that I should be doing. I don't want residue left that will attract any significant amount of dust or pollen.
I don’t know, but it seems like you’re using the right product. The WD is for Water Disbursing and that’s what you’re trying to do. Once the water has been removed, they should not rust.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:53 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
The problem to solve: I used a shovel, pruning shears, loppers, hammer, PVC cutters, etc while repairing my underground water line. They all got muddy and wet. I hosed them off to remove the mud. If I let them air dry, then any steel parts including swivel points will be coated with rust.

Spraying with WD-40 and wiping off with a rag is what I usually use, but only because it's what I've always done. Spraying is convenient and the lack of viscosity lets the fluid go everywhere. So I thought that I'd ask if there was something different that I should be doing. I don't want residue left that will attract any significant amount of dust or pollen.
That's actually the purpose WD-40 was designed for. WD stands for "water displacement." If you spray down your tools with WD-40 and store them indoors, you don't need to do anything else.

Edit: Looks like Jerry beat me to it.
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Old 08-25-2019, 08:17 PM   #17
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Except you got it right, it’s displacement, not disbursing. Team work!
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Old 08-25-2019, 08:30 PM   #18
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That's interesting to know. For garden tools, wouldn't you want to wipe off the WD40? It can't be good for plants.

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That's actually the purpose WD-40 was designed for. WD stands for "water displacement." If you spray down your tools with WD-40 and store them indoors, you don't need to do anything else.

Edit: Looks like Jerry beat me to it.
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:46 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbo111 View Post
For many years I used wd-40 to lube my bicycle chains. Turns out it is a degreaser and actually removes lubricant from the chain. It is ok to use to clean a chain, but should be followed with some type of lube.

According to their page on myths:

Myth: WD-40® Multi-Use Product should not be used on bike chains.

Fact: While WD-40® Multi-Use Product it is not a grease, it is formulated with strong lubricating oils and other ingredients, and is a terrific product to use for bike maintenance. It does not attract dirt or moisture to metal surfaces – just be sure to wipe off any excess WD-40® Multi-Use Product before riding.
For long-term lubrication and other specialized bicycle maintenance needs, check out WD-40® BIKE. Developed specifically for cyclists and mechanics, this high-performance line of bicycle care products is sure to become a mainstay in the toolboxes of bike mechanics for decades.
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:57 PM   #20
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That's interesting to know. For garden tools, wouldn't you want to wipe off the WD40? It can't be good for plants.
The stuff is so thin, it doesn't leave a lot of residue. After a week I suspect most of it has evaporated or broken down. You could rinse off the tools with a little detergent and water as a precaution before using them.
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