Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-06-2015, 12:39 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Car-Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Citizen of Texas
Posts: 1,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrvlBug View Post

I must admit, it took me a few nano seconds before I decided what I should do.

You?
Not too long ago, I was overpaid exactly $2,000 when I cashed out at one of the casinos I frequent. I did consider what to do for a few seconds.
__________________

__________________
Car-Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-06-2015, 01:05 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,415
I used to be completely thorough about correcting any pricing mistakes at my local grocery, until I realized how much time was involved in doing so. Now I'll only press for corrections if the mistake is over a dollar. Almost all the mistakes are in their favor, so I just mentally assume their prices are slightly higher than advertised. In the rare case an item scans for less than I expected, I now let that go as partial repayment for overpaying all the small items I was too impatient to correct.

On the other hand if items fail to scan or a cashier fails to see an item in the cart, I always bring that to their attention to correct. I don't know why that seems so qualitatively different to me, but pricing errors and scanner errors seem different. Likewise I always correct restaurant bills that missed items. Missed pricing in any other store (or restaurant) I also correct. It's just my nearest neighborhood grocery where time fatigue of fixing errors has driven me to let them mostly go.
__________________

__________________
growing_older is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2015, 01:32 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,221
Here's one I remember. Our son was just a few months old and I had a pack of disposable diapers on the shelf under the grocery cart. When I unloaded the cart I told the clerk about the diapers down below.

When I got home and looked at the receipt I saw that she hadn't included the diapers. I did not go back and pay for them. But I realized that I liked not paying for them!!

And that got me thinking about the cost of those things and how often I paid for them. So we looked into what it would cost to buy cloth diapers and plastic pants and extra loads of laundry. That's what we ended up doing and I was very glad we went that route.

Another one - I worked for a company for just a few months (1978) and hated it and left. We had some kind of savings plan (it wasn't retirement funds or even pre-tax) and I was contributing with every paycheck. On one of the payroll cycles they had an error and had to rerun with new checks. When I got my final paycheck and cashed out the savings there was an extra amount in my savings account, equal to one payroll cycle. Nope, never told them.
__________________
Married, both 61. DH retired June, 2010. I have a pleasant little part time job.
Sue J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2015, 02:01 PM   #24
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 416
Years ago when I worked for a small chain of retail liquor stores (all cash business back then), I took all the money to the bank for deposit--was in there everyday and knew all the tellers by name. Also got change (quarters, dollars, etc.), and asked for 50 one-dollar bills (they come wrapped in bundles of 50). Teller gives me the bundle and proceeds to do deposit receipts, etc. Bundle was 50 $100 bills--I must have stared at it for 2-3 minutes before telling her of the mistake.

Yesterday, went to Pizza Hut for my carryout order. Total was $15.24, so I give the clerk a $20 bill and a quarter to make it easy--give me back a $5 bill and a penny. He hands me $6 bucks. Told him of the mistake--he stares at the cash machine screen for about 20 seconds, then a light comes on his head and he thanks me. Don't think cash retailing is in his future.
__________________
Payin-the-Toll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2015, 02:08 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 342
OP here. As many of you, I have discovered the overlooked bottled water or soda at the bottom of my grocery cart once I unload at the car. The reason I don't go back is because there have been a time or 2 where meat was sold after the sell date and smelled bad when opened, fruit/veggie were rotten or so dry and had to be tossed, etc, etc. I have never gone back to the store for a refund therefore feel no guilt. They owe me more $ than I owe them. On the other hand, I have always pointed out any errors while checking out. Has also happened a couple of times when dining out and the error has always been brought to their attention, under or over charged.

As TexasProud mentioned, I am getting real tired of correcting my contractors' mistakes, all in their favor up to this point and in the $100s of dollars. With the high $ amount, there was no question in my mind what I was going to do, however, if they had overlooked the $350 item, I may have rationalized that had my negotiating skills been better, my costs would have been that much or more less, but knowing my, I'm sure I would have brought the error to their attention.

The reason I posted this is because I was curious because of what happened to a friend of mine last week. I actually should have posted an anonymous poll. My friend lost a pouch of expensive jewelry after a trip a few years ago. After tearing her house apart a number of times and waiting a long time for the jewelry to reappear, she finally filed an insurance claim about a year ago. One item was replaced in kind, one was not on the rider, so they only paid to policy, others paid based on rider. She replaced all of the jewelry. She found the pouch last week. At a group business dinner the next day, she asked if anyone knew how the insurance company would handle this as she wasn't sure she wanted 2 of the same items. She was amazed that most people told her to keep the stuff and not notify the insurance company. So this got me to thinking... ...are people generally that dishonest or is it because in her case it was the big, bad insurance company, whereas in mine it was a local family owned business. BTW, I was also surprised that so many people would tell her to keep it and not notify the ins co.
__________________
TrvlBug is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2015, 02:33 PM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 9,782
Once or twice a year I discover a credit card purchase that was never credited to my account. It's always a small item. I don't follow up on these, because I had agreed to pay and I figure it's the merchant's job to have reliable payment systems in place.
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2015, 02:47 PM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
prudent_one's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 153
I will point out errors even if they are in my favor. But I recognize that's easy for me when a few bucks isn't going to hurt. Therefore I like to think "do the right thing now, karma and all that."

However, I wonder what I would do if money was tight and a few bucks was a big deal. Would I think "here's karma smiling on me for all those times I was generous?" I can see myself rationalizing it away just like that.
__________________
prudent_one is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 08:13 AM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,592
If "karma" was an actual thing; alas, it doesn't seem to work...

Generally, if it's not yours, don't take it. The only reward is a sense of inner peace, and maybe some holier-than-thou... :-P
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 08:40 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrvlBug View Post
So this got me to thinking... ...are people generally that dishonest or is it because in her case it was the big, bad insurance company, whereas in mine it was a local family owned business. BTW, I was also surprised that so many people would tell her to keep it and not notify the ins co.
I worked in insurance for almost 40 years and I'd have called them, but I know most people rationalize it with "I paid my premiums all those years so they owe me".

When I was a teenager, my brothers found an abandoned bike- in very good condition. My parents did the right thing: called the Police Department and reported it found, and put an ad in the paper. No responses other than people who called about the ad but couldn't describe it correctly. In the meantime, I was riding it around and having a good time. At one point a man in his yard called me over and asked where I'd gotten the bike. I told him the whole story, and he said it had been stolen and belonged to one of his kids. He went with me to talk with my parents and said that he hadn't checked the Lost and Found ads because he figured no one would post it, and he'd called the Sheriff's Department but not the police. He also mentioned having filed a claim with his insurance. He was credible and we gave the bike back but I was annoyed. We always wondered if the insurance company ever heard about it.
__________________
athena53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 10:00 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFWR View Post
If "karma" was an actual thing; alas, it doesn't seem to work...

Generally, if it's not yours, don't take it. The only reward is a sense of inner peace, and maybe some holier-than-thou... :-P
When we do good, we like to think we would be rewarded. Inner peace may be that sole reward. But same as with karma, it doesn't always work. I mean, bad people may sleep more soundly than you and I.
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leo Tolstoy
NW-Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 10:46 AM   #31
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: San Jose
Posts: 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrvlBug View Post
So this got me to thinking... ...are people generally that dishonest or is it because in her case it was the big, bad insurance company, whereas in mine it was a local family owned business. BTW, I was also surprised that so many people would tell her to keep it and not notify the ins co.
Years ago, I had a handgun stolen during a home burglary. It wasn't the only thing stolen, but was the most expensive. At the time, it was probably worth about $2000.

It was recovered by a police department last year. One of the things they asked me was did I file a claim when it was stolen, because if I had, it was now owned by the insurance company and they'd have to return it to them instead of me. I was 99% sure I hadn't, but I called the insurance company anyway to confirm if I'd filed a claim for a home burglary. As I suspected, I hadn't. (side note - the reason I didn't was, I've heard enough horror stories about people filing small homeowner's claims and then having their rates skyrocket or the insurance company drop them, I decided long ago I'd only ever file a homeowner's claim in a catastrophic loss like a fire).

The other items stolen were inconsequential compared to the handgun. If I'd filed a claim, I still would have had $500 come out of my pocket for the deductible. And I've paid them tens of thousands of dollars in premiums over the years (I've had the same insurance company since I turned 16 and started driving), and only had one chargeable accident and it was minimal.

So it got me to thinking...what if I had filed a claim? Would I have told them, and let the insurance company take possession? I'm not so sure I would have. I might have succumbed to the "big bad insurance company" line of thinking the OP mentioned.

I'm glad I didn't face that moral test, as I'm not so sure I would have passed.
__________________
LoneAspen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 10:47 AM   #32
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 15,481
It is frustrating and we all decide what we want to do, but if I had an item at Walmart that would not scan after several tries and no customer service available to help, I would not even consider taking it--I would leave it on the counter or I would get in a line to have a real person deal with it. No question that it is wrong to just take it.

And the security cameras can catch this, you could have a record, and then you have to deal with a shoplifting charge, and why would a judge say it was okay?
__________________

Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 10:55 AM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,762
overstock.com credited me $400+ because they said something I bought 2 years previously was never delivered. Good effort on their part to be honest, but they were wrong in my case.

Because it was delivered.

I called them to tell them of their error. The clerk was dumbfounded that I let them know. She said she would have just spent the little bonus!

I found her honest response to be disturbing. Disturbing enough that I don't shop at overstock.com anymore.
__________________
JoeWras is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 10:55 AM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,355
I overpaid the IRS for about 7 years until I found my mistake. They had no moral dilemma keeping my money for the first 4 of those years.
__________________
Fermion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 03:04 PM   #35
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Illinois and Florida
Posts: 3,935
As this topic fades, here's an interesting comment on morality that deserves a read... "Why I Defaulted on My Student Loans"

http://http://www.nytimes.com/2015/0...ent-loans.html

A writer's outlook on the balance of morality between the public laws and the individual. Unspoken, but challenging the letter of the law, with the matter of personal responsibility.

note: Anytime a NYT article pops up a paywall, searching the article title will usually bring up a legal link.
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 03:39 PM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 10,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
As this topic fades, here's an interesting comment on morality that deserves a read... "Why I Defaulted on My Student Loans"
Thanks--I read it and believe the author is typical of many self-entitled people. Everyone is to blame for her situation but her. She "deserves" to be a writer, she's too good to work in some "regular" job where she could earn enough to pay back the loans--the ones she took voluntarily. And then she gives tips to others on how to defraud.
Whatever she learned in her college, she didn't become a real adult there.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 04:14 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 2,241
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bestwifeever View Post
It is frustrating and we all decide what we want to do, but if I had an item at Walmart that would not scan after several tries and no customer service available to help, I would not even consider taking it--I would leave it on the counter or I would get in a line to have a real person deal with it. No question that it is wrong to just take it.

And the security cameras can catch this, you could have a record, and then you have to deal with a shoplifting charge, and why would a judge say it was okay?
There is no way you would be charged with shoplifting for this. First of all there are no instructions on the scanner. The store knows they are risking some items not being paid for because they were not scanned correctly but they make it up by saving the cashiers salary. You pick up your item, slide it across the machine and throw it in your bag. There is nothing in any penal code that says "while using a grocery scanner you must be absolutely sure that every item scans correctly". If the item doesn't scan correctly or for the correct price, that's the store's fault. If you were seen on a security camera putting an item straight into your bag making no attempt to scan it, then it would be shoplifting. They have to be able to prove your intent. How are they going to prove you didn't know it was scanned when you ran it across the machine?
__________________
utrecht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 04:29 PM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
youbet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 9,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fermion View Post
I overpaid the IRS for about 7 years until I found my mistake. They had no moral dilemma keeping my money for the first 4 of those years.
Did the IRS actually know you overpaid and did someone there actually make a decision to not inform you and return your money?

While I wouldn't count on it happening, I had the IRS send me a check due to an arithmetic error on my part back in the days of doing my taxes manually.
__________________
"I wasn't born blue blood. I was born blue-collar." John Wort Hannam
youbet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 04:35 PM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
youbet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 9,580
Lots of insight into people given by their responses and comments in this thread.
__________________
"I wasn't born blue blood. I was born blue-collar." John Wort Hannam
youbet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2015, 05:23 PM   #40
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 15,481
Quote:
Originally Posted by utrecht View Post
There is no way you would be charged with shoplifting for this. First of all there are no instructions on the scanner. The store knows they are risking some items not being paid for because they were not scanned correctly but they make it up by saving the cashiers salary. You pick up your item, slide it across the machine and throw it in your bag. There is nothing in any penal code that says "while using a grocery scanner you must be absolutely sure that every item scans correctly". If the item doesn't scan correctly or for the correct price, that's the store's fault. If you were seen on a security camera putting an item straight into your bag making no attempt to scan it, then it would be shoplifting. They have to be able to prove your intent. How are they going to prove you didn't know it was scanned when you ran it across the machine?
I guess it's okay then for you to just take it without paying for it.
__________________

__________________

Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do "gifted" people have a moral obligation to work? navydavey Other topics 131 12-31-2012 06:19 PM
Moral Quandary: Free healthcare using a loophole in state system wantingToGetOut Health and Early Retirement 33 07-07-2012 08:38 AM
Moral dilemma outside CVS shoe Other topics 25 02-27-2007 09:59 PM
Moral Dilemna......Whistleblowing............. FinanceDude Other topics 30 01-12-2007 09:53 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:54 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.