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Old 02-15-2015, 02:17 PM   #2021
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I just finished reading Good Leaders Ask Great Questions by John Maxwell.
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Old 02-15-2015, 03:33 PM   #2022
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I am nearly through my first re-read of To Kill A Mockingbird in I-don't-know-how-long (still a fantastic novel) and now this about another novel by Harper Lee to appear later in 2015:

Harper Lee Bombshell: How News of Book Related to ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Unfolded - WSJ

To say I'm psyched is putting it mildly.

Edit: that seems to be a link that requires WSJ subscription, sorry. I do not subscribe but found it with a Google search for "harper lee".
Just an FYI for anyone who may be interested -- if you copy and paste the url above into the Google search box, the first result you get will be this article and you can read it without needing a WSJ subscription. This also works with many other password protected articles.
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What have you read recently?
Old 02-15-2015, 07:03 PM   #2023
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What have you read recently?

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Just an FYI for anyone who may be interested -- if you copy and paste the url above into the Google search box, the first result you get will be this article and you can read it without needing a WSJ subscription. This also works with many other password protected articles.

That's great! Good to know somebody knows the tips and ins and outs around this jook joint.

I did finish my re-read and my opinion of the book is better than ever. I read the "enhanced edition", which adds commentaries, videos, and audio with Sissy Spacek reading a chapter. I discovered those enhancements did not work on my Paperwhite, but were fine on the Kindle app. Maybe a Fire might work.

As much as I like Sissy Spacek, the voice of Scout in the film is indelible in my mind. It helps that the actress (Mary Badham) was a dead-on lookalike for this little girl I had a big crush on in about 7th grade. She was a little sister tag-along on a date one of my older siblings went on. The four of us went to see a free screening at the library of guess-what.
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Old 02-16-2015, 12:55 AM   #2024
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After reading the most recent book by Atul Gawande, a surgeon, as reported here, I requested from the library his first two books.

In his first book, Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science (2002), Gawande talks about fallability of doctors, who of course make human mistakes in their work. He next describes some anecdotal puzzling illnesses that he personally knows of. The last part of the book retells some cases he was personally involved in that had ambiguous symptoms, and doctors could easily take the wrong course of action.

In his second book, Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance (2007), Gawande talks about how some doctors provide better care with their diligence and ingenuity. Near the end of the book, he describes how he is impressed with Indian surgeons who manage to treat impoverished patients with so little equipment, and who are able to perform many different operations that he would not dare to tackle.

In my younger days, I would not be too interested in books like these, but after seeing our parents through old age, illness and death, and myself at the age when maladies start to sneak up on you, and indeed having been through some major operations for a life-threatening disease, I appreciate these books on medicine subjects more. Gawande has many interesting stories to tell, and he knows how to write for laymen.
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Old 02-16-2015, 01:00 PM   #2025
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Hi NW-Bound, which Gawande book do you recommend as a first read? Also do you get a bit depressed by this kind of book?

DW avoids any TV documentaries that involve unpleasant issues of health. So I don't tend to see them. She has been personally very upset by her friend's health issues even though the friend seems to be happy and outwardly in good health.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:20 AM   #2026
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Gawande's last book, Being Mortal, may be depressing to some. I would suggest his first book, Complications, which tells the reader that doctors are only humans, not God. The human body have maladies that can be difficult to diagnose and pinpoint.

All three books are worthwhile reading material for laymen to learn more about the healthcare profession. No, I do not get depressed by these books. I have been through a lot, and nothing much scares me. And I am not one who sticks his head in sand.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:28 AM   #2027
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Thanks NW. Have been on a long wait list for Being Mortal. I'll check out Complications first.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:41 AM   #2028
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TCM is showing Mockingbird at 10pm EST tonight (Wed 2/18). That's one of the "I'm glad I saw the movie before I read the book but loved them both" on my list. The Godfather is another.
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Old 03-05-2015, 11:27 PM   #2029
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I heard of The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006) by Michael Pollan some years ago, but only recently remembered to request it from the library.

The author describes how so much of the food we eat today comes from corn, either as processed food or as animal feed. He spends some time at a true organic farm, and learns how the food produced there differs from industrial organic food sold at Whole Foods which must be produced on a large scale. At the end of the book, he talks of a meal he obtains as a hunter-gatherer, with meat from a feral pig and wild mushroom and fruits collected from the wild. Here, he sidetracks quite a bit with his mycology enthusiasm, but I find the discussion interesting.

Pollan understands that truly wholesome food grown by small organic farmers may not be accessible to everybody, but he makes us aware of the nature of the food that we eat, and the way livestock is raised. He also asks questions about the moral and ecological consequences of our food production methods.

I am not sure how the knowledge I gain from this book will change the way I eat, but I have learned a lot about the origin of my meal.
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Old 03-06-2015, 06:41 AM   #2030
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The Survivor by Gregg Hurwitz. Nate Overbay, a former soldier suffering from PTSD and ALS, goes to an eleventh-floor bank and climbs onto the ledge, ready to end it all. But as he's steeling himself to jump, a when a crew of gunmen bursts into the bank and begins shooting employees and customers. With nothing to lose, Nate climbs back inside and, with military precision, Nate begins taking out the robbers, one by one. The last man standing leaves Nate with a cryptic warning: He will make you pay in ways you can't imagine…
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Old 03-06-2015, 06:44 AM   #2031
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Reading (A "Better Call Saul" lawyer type character): Past Due by William Lashner. A defense attorney who lives his life in shades of gray, Victor Carl fights all the right fights for all the wrong reasons. With a failing legal practice, a dead-end love life, a pile of unpaid traffic tickets, and a talent for mixing it up in tough working-class bars and sparring with obstinate cops, Victor skates on the razor's edge of legal ethics in search of the easy buck. But the one absolute in Victor's life is loyalty, especially to a client--even if he happens to be dead.
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Old 03-06-2015, 07:17 AM   #2032
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I am reading the book, "One Man, One Vote," a 1972 book about the history behind the landmark SCOTUS case, "Baker v. Carr." That case established the rule that Congressional and state legislative districts must be of (approximately) equal (population). Back in the first half of the 20th century, state legislatures routinely defied their own constitutions which required redistricting every 10 years so rural areas (the ones whose populations were declining) got the big breaks when it came to allocations of funds while the urban areas (the ones whose populations grew) got the shaft. Legislative leaders who almost always came from these rural areas repeatedly stymied attempts to fix this inequity while the state courts did the same. The federal courts were bound by an earlier SCOTUS decision until Baker v. Carr overturned it in 1962.
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Old 03-14-2015, 03:05 PM   #2033
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Just finished Unbroken. I couldn't put it down. I saw the movie around New Years but the book is even more riveting. Really an unbelievable story of survival and beautifully written. Highly recommended!
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Old 03-14-2015, 03:30 PM   #2034
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Just finished Unbroken. I couldn't put it down. I saw the movie around New Years but the book is even more riveting. Really an unbelievable story of survival and beautifully written. Highly recommended!
In my opinion the book is much better than the movie.
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Old 03-14-2015, 08:18 PM   #2035
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I'm reading Erik Larsen's new book Dead Wake. It's about the Lusitania. I really enjoy his books.



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Old 03-14-2015, 08:31 PM   #2036
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Finished The Bogleheads Guide to Investing! I found it pretty accessible and a great "reinforcer" to the topics mentioned here and at bogleheads.org. Started into The Bogleheads Guide to Retirement and that is much more meaty & dense.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:40 PM   #2037
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Just finished the Linda Tirado book, Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America…. It is a well-written, honest account of what life is like as a low wage worker in America today. She's engaging and funny, and able to explain her life without lengthy political asides…. If you are interested in social justice topics or just want to know a little more about life at the edges of our society, I think you'd like this.
Thanks for the tip, I have ordered from the library. In the meantime, I Googled the book and found a review at the New York Times. While I have no experience of blue collar work, the following excerpt rang true to me as common in contemporary employment of all sorts (emphasis added):
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The factory manager of the Landmark Plastic Company in Akron, Ohio, once told me that he was so concerned about high turnover among workers that he began holding exit interviews to find out why they were leaving. The answers surprised him. It wasn’t the meager pay, the noise, the mind-numbing assembly lines or the mist of plastic dust in the air. Instead, most employees complained “that they didn’t feel needed, necessary or wanted,” the manager reported, and were treated like “just another body.”
No one likes to feel taken for granted. Sadly, more and more businesses treat their employees as little more than fungible, easily replaceable commodities: see generally Fraser, White-Collar Sweatshop: The Deterioration of Work and Its Rewards in Corporate America (2001). The attitude "I'm paying you for your work, I shouldn't have to say 'thank you'" may be understandable, but is unlikely to result in loyalty or dedication.
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:25 PM   #2038
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I've been working on Clive Cussler's "Poseidon's Arrow" for about 2 months now.
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Old 03-16-2015, 11:28 AM   #2039
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I just finished book three of the “Ashfall” series. The disaster event which sets events in motion is the eruption of the Yellowstone caldera, which blankets much of the US in ash then snow, with years of darkened skies. The books focus on a teen age couple and the extended family they accrue in their efforts to not only survive, but begin a new thriving community.

Mike Mullin | I write books teens love to read.

As far back as second grade, science fiction was my favorite genre, how intelligence and scientific achieve could continue to lift humanity. Since retirement though it’s been “post-apocalyptic world” (PAW) fiction. To me, it continues to seem ever more likely that we face widespread disaster, then a future of peaceful development.

I got the books on “interlibrary loan”, but have put them on my to be purchases list whenever we finally get out of living in rented housing and into a place we own… I am, and am not, looking forward to one final move (once the wife finally decides she is ready to retire also).
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Old 03-16-2015, 09:31 PM   #2040
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been binge reading this winter. went thru Sue Grafton's alphabet and am close to finishing local library's Alex Crosses
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