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Old 07-30-2015, 02:35 PM   #2141
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"The Chase" by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg. Quick read about a master con artist Nicolas Fox and die-hard FBI agent Kate O'Hare. I did not even realize that it was part of a series, so will need to read the first one.

"The Martian" by Andy Weir. It is not the type of book that I normally ready. I started it and put it down to read "The Chase", but went back and finished it. I saw the preview for the movie at the theater, so I wanted to finish it before the movie came out. I did enjoy the book and I am glad that I finished it.

I am currently reading "Outlander" by Diane Gabaldon. It is about a married nurse living in 1940 and is on a second honeymoon with her DH in Scotland. The war has just ended. She is hurled back in time, through a stone circle, and finds herself in 1743. This is a series of 8 or 9 books. It has been made into a TV series. I do not usually read books from ancient times, but I am quite enjoying this book.

"The Martian" and "Outlander" were on a list of books that were page turner type of books and I decided to try to find them at our local library. I can't remember if "Outlander" was on the list or if it was one of the comments that people wrote saying they could not believe this book was not on the list.
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Old 07-30-2015, 05:37 PM   #2142
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Just finished a P.D. James novel, Innocent Blood, link here: http://www.amazon.com/Innocent-Blood...nt+blood+james
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Adopted as a child into a privileged family, Philippa Palfrey fantasizes that she is the daughter of an aristocrat and a parlor maid. The terrifying truth about her parents and a long-ago murder is only the first in a series of shocking betrayals. Philippa quickly learns that those who delve into the secrets of the past must be on guard when long-buried horrors begin to stir.
It is very much a study of the dark side of the characters. Some things come together at the end. It is dark and sometimes hard going because the characters are not heroic in the traditional sense i.e. there is nobody solving a mystery with brilliant detective work. But I couldn't leave it and found the end to be very interesting. Also P.D. James has such a good command of the English language which it a rich reading experience.
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Old 07-31-2015, 10:38 AM   #2143
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I was thinking of reading this http://www.endofabsence.com/the-end-of-absence/
"What does it mean to be the only generation in history that will know life with and without the Internet? In this debut work of nonfiction, Michael Harris describes a singular, Gutenberg-scale shift-point in human history. "
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Old 07-31-2015, 10:41 AM   #2144
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I am Malala, by Malala Yousafzai with Christina Lamb (2013). I couldn't put it down. I am so grateful to have lived in parts of the world where most basic human rights are taken for granted.
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Old 08-02-2015, 06:18 PM   #2145
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Not a new release, but I finally caught up with the audio version of "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" by Mark Haddon which I would highly recommend. Told entirely from the POV of an autistic boy, I found this a lot more compelling than I anticipated.
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Old 08-02-2015, 06:21 PM   #2146
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The new Lee Child book, Make Me, which hasn't come out yet. As a former librarian I get to read lots of galleys! It was good, but not as great as previous books. Still, love Reacher!
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Old 08-02-2015, 08:07 PM   #2147
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Just started reading "A Time for Truth" (Ted Cruz). Pretty good so far.
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Several Stimulating Books
Old 08-02-2015, 11:22 PM   #2148
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Several Stimulating Books

American Nations, A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America; Colin Woodard. "Fascinating . . . engrossing . . . a smart read that feels particularly timely now." -- The Boston Globe My mother and I are native to what Woodard calls El Norte. Her roots are The Midlands and Yankeedom. My father and his parents are native to Greater Appalachia. I live now in the Far West, specifically Nevada, as a refugee from El Norte, specifically California.

Genome, The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters, Matt Ridley. "A fascinating tour of the human genome. . . . If you want to catch a glimpse of the biotech century that is now dawning. . . Genome is an excellent place to start. " -- Wall Street Jornal

What's Wrong with Benevolence; Happiness, Private Property, and the Limits of Enlightenment; David Stove. "Stove's mordant wit exposes the assumptions of the modern world for the self-serving and dangerous myths they are." James Franklin

The Thin Green Line; The Money Secrets of the Super Wealthy; Paul Sullivan; Wealth Matters columnist, The New York Times "Chances are you will buy this book for its smart and practical advice about building true wealth (Seriously, buy it.) But what kept me hooked were the tales of money decisions gone horribly awry: fortunes squandered, kids ruined by inheritances, and rich people made miserable by their riches. Learn from the wise, or learn for the foolish -- either way, you win." Dan Heath . . . "There's good how-to stuff here, but Sullivan's added value is his gentle insistence that wealth and money aren't synonyms." -- Kirkus Reviews. Reading the book, I kept thinking that the fabulously rich can be as screwed up as the rest of us.

The End of Men and the Rise of Women, Hanna Rosin; "In this bold and inspired dispatch, Rosin upends the common platitudes of contemporary sexual politics with a deeply reported meditation from the unexpected frontiers of our rapidly changing culture." Katie Rolphe. Men can be almost pathetically grateful for the recognition of our plight in modern society. By making it safe and comfortable for women and children in general, we have worked ourselves out of a job. Rolphe's observations would be intolerable if a man had written them.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:02 PM   #2149
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I read The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer (2010) by Siddhartha Mukherjee.

The author is an oncologist. While this book is aimed at laymen, it delves more deeply into the historical background and technical aspects of cancer treatments than most readers would expect. It also chronicles the study of the cause of cancers, and describes how researchers were misled when they looked for the elusive single and common cause of all cancers, which does not exist.

The author spends quite a bit of time on how the treatments for breast cancer and leukemia have progressed through the ages, and how doctors and researchers fumbled on their way to look for effective treatments. It is gruesome to read about how William Halsted, a surgeon, developed the radical mastectomy in 1882 when anesthesiology was primitive and antibiotics had not been discovered.

This is a well-researched book (it won a Pulitzer prize), and the interested reader would pick up a lot of interesting facts. For example, penicillin was so precious in 1939 that it was recovered from the urine of treated patients for reuse. Reading this book demands a devotion, and the less engaged audience may find it easier to watch a 3-part PBS video series based on this book.

It is sobering for the reader to realize that while great progress has been made with certain types of cancer like Hogkin's lymphoma, not much can be done for some cancers such as pancreatic cancer, or even breast cancer patients whose tumor is Her-2 negative and does not respond to regular treatments. If there's any part of our body that can attain immortality or difficult to kill, it's the cancer cells in our body.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:20 PM   #2150
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I read The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer (2010) by Siddhartha Mukherjee.

The author is an oncologist. While this book is aimed at laymen, it delves more deeply into the historical background and technical aspects of cancer treatments than most readers would expect.

This is a well-researched book (it won a Pulitzer prize), and the interested reader would pick up a lot of interesting facts. For example, penicillin was so precious in 1939 that it was recovered from the urine of treated patients for reuse. Reading this book demands a devotion, and the less engaged audience may find it easier to watch a 3-part PBS video series based on this book.
I recommended this book on this thread back in 2011.

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I am in the middle of "The Emperor of all Maladies" by Siddartha Mukherjee. The author is an oncologist who started a project on the history of cancer and realized that he was describing a phenomenon with a personality. So it's subtitled "a biography of cancer". He has a very engaging writing style and the suspense keeps the pages turning. It has won a ton of awards, including the Pulitzer prize. Highly recommended.

The Emperor of All Maladies
It's interesting to read your perspective on it. You found it a bit of a hard slog, while I found it very easy to read, probably due to my medical background. I did watch the PBS series but found it just scratched the surface.

The reason it is well researched is that it started out as Dr. Mukherjee's research project for his oncology fellowship.
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Old 08-14-2015, 07:14 PM   #2151
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It is true that the video series covers just a small portion of the info in the book, but it might be the right amount before the typical viewer's eyes glaze over. My wife was able to watch the video with me, but hell must freeze over before she would read the book as I did.

And I have no doubt medical professionals would find it easy to read, while some of them would find talk about audio or loudspeakers boring out of their wits.
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Old 08-14-2015, 07:32 PM   #2152
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Another book I read recently was Irrational Exuberance by Robert Shiller.

When I reserved this book from the local library, I made sure that I was getting the 3rd edition (2014) of this book. The 1st edition came out in 2000, right before the crash of the dot-com bubble. The 2nd edition (2006) was right before the subprime RE crash. And in this 3rd edition, Shiller was not happy with both the stock and the RE markets!

Shiller is no fan of the EMH (Efficient Market Hypothesis), although he agrees that it is difficult to beat the market. A reason he cites is the influence of the masses or group think, and even "smart money" people or money managers cannot escape that. It is interesting that Shiller got the 2013 Nobel Prize jointly with Farma who is an EMH proponent.

There is a long wait on the reservation list for this book. Yet, when I finally got it, I was surprised that the copy was in good shape, like it was hardly read. I think many readers expect to see a simple formula to trade the market to get rich quickly, thumb through the book looking for it, and not finding it, quickly drop it aside.
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Old 08-15-2015, 01:11 AM   #2153
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I wanted to find out if anyone has read any of the "Freakonomics" books and if so, what your impressions were.
I have read earlier books by one of the authors (S. Dubner) and liked those, (autobiographical books, not the ones with Leavitt) and was not aware that the later books have turned into popular blogs and podcasts.
I noticed there's a new book that has come out this year by the two of them as well.
I will take a look in the library or bookstore. So far just saw it online.
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Old 08-15-2015, 05:21 AM   #2154
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I wanted to find out if anyone has read any of the "Freakonomics" books and if so, what your impressions were.
I have, and enjoyed it.

Mostly the aspect and power of individual incentives, and why people do what they do. Some of their assertions may be on very shaky foundation, but they make you think about a problem or situations in new ways.
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Old 08-15-2015, 08:36 AM   #2155
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I learned about Freakonomics (2005) here on this forum, checked it out from the library, and enjoyed it. So, there are many readers of this book here.

I was subsequently gifted SuperFreakonomics (2009), and enjoyed it too. I like to read non-fictions, and the above are among the easy-reading type. I have read that the second book's discussion of global warming was controversial and disputed by some experts.

This discussion reminded me to look to see if the authors have written more along this line. I found that they have Think Like A Freak (2015). This book appears not as highly regarded as the 1st, but I am going to read it. If nothing else, it is going to be entertaining, I am sure.
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Old 08-24-2015, 04:02 PM   #2156
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I'm drawn to non fiction disaster books. No matter what dismal things are happening in my own life and world it is comforting to be able to say "could be worse!"
I just finished an excellent book on the Donner party, The Indifferent Stars Above. Well researched and beautifully written. Me, I would have lasted in those appalling circumstances about a day and a half. Interesting that the survivors tended to be the young women, not the men.
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Old 08-24-2015, 07:04 PM   #2157
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Just finished "Boys in the Boat" by Daniel James Brown, good easy read and interesting story of competitive rowing teams, the people and hard times of the great depression and 1936 Olympics.
I read this at the beach last week. Excellent.
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Old 08-24-2015, 07:07 PM   #2158
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The book on the Donner party I just mentioned is written by Daniel James Brown. I will definitely read his other works. He has one on the Great Hinckley Fire, of local interest here in MN.
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Old 08-24-2015, 07:43 PM   #2159
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+3 on "The Boys in The Boat" - I gained a new appreciation for the discipline of team rowing + "catching a crab" and "ten big ones". Set in depression era Seattle with tie-ins to Sequim, Berkeley, and Nazi Germany.
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Old 08-24-2015, 09:41 PM   #2160
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I just blazed through a few different books. The Cheapskate Next Door was the latest. I think it agreed with me more than The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches.
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