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Old 09-16-2013, 09:09 PM   #1621
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I just began reading, "This Town," by Mark Leibovich. He has been on a lot of TV shows promoting his book which is about Washington D.C. and the people in it. Good book so far.
Laugh out loud funny in parts. He skewers everyone.

I'm also reading Lawrence in Arabia. Really gives you perspective on the middle east, particularly Syria. NOT laugh out loud funny, but he's a great writer--makes it easy to understand how things got the way they were 100 years ago...
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Old 09-20-2013, 03:05 PM   #1622
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I recently finished reading "Unregulated Capitalism" by George Gaasvig. He has some interesting albeit controversial ideas. It is thought provoking and well written.

Unregulated Capitalism: Unregulated Capitalism is Destroying Democracy and the Economy: George Gaasvig: 9781483980492: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 10-03-2013, 03:24 PM   #1623
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Just started 'the convoluted UNIVERSE book IV' by Delores Cannon. In the forward section she mentioned twisting you mind like a pretzel. Only on page 25, but I see pretzels.

Anyone read any of Delores books?

MRG
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Old 10-03-2013, 04:22 PM   #1624
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DW had The Legacy by Peter Turnbull checked out of the library and I needed a book. Read it and kind of enjoyed this short British police procedural. Turnbull has a whole series of Detective Inspector Hennessy novels.

This book takes place around York (northern England). BTW, York is a tourist destination we have visited and has a lot of historical significance + a great cathedral. One could read this and then travel to Britain with York as a nice stop over. Good for a least 2 days. I could even recommend a B&B there.

Here is a link to the 23 book series: Hennessey and Yellich series by Peter Turnbull
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Old 10-14-2013, 05:31 PM   #1625
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This is what I have read recently:Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Perhaps the most amazing story of our times.
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:33 AM   #1626
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About half way through "I, Claudius" by Robert Graves. Absolutely mesmerising - and it completely reverses the writing mantra of "show, don't tell".
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:51 AM   #1627
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The Raven's Gift, by Don Rearden, is a bit like Cormac McCarthy's, The Road, set in the Alaskan tundra. The narrative flashing back and forth between a couple of teachers learning the ropes of their new life as teachers in a remote Alaskan village and one of them struggling to survive after the entire area is destroyed by some sort of bird flu. Part thriller, part love story. Quite a good read.
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:54 AM   #1628
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This is what I have read recently:Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Perhaps the most amazing story of our times.
Are you recommending the Wikipedia article or a book about the program?
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Old 10-15-2013, 08:37 AM   #1629
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don, is the Raven's Gift as depressing as The Road? After much consideration, I grew to appreciate The Road, but hesitated to recommend it to DH. Yours sounds ever so slightly cheerier, maybe?
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Old 10-15-2013, 08:41 AM   #1630
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Yes, it is more upbeat. The author uses the plot to educate us a bit on Alaskan native culture and problems. It is an interesting glimpse at people most of us know next to nothing about. The ending has an element of redemption or maybe re-awakening.
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:55 AM   #1631
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I was down in the public market one sunny day last week. At the Pike Street entrance, just above a butcher shop there is an old fashioned leftist used book store. On an outside rack, for $1 I picked up a hardback called All Loves Excelling, by Josiah Bunting III, who was at the time of writing or shortly before the headmaster of The Lawrenceville School near Princeton, NJ. It's a story about a young woman of very average talents who wants to go to Dartmouth (and her hard charging mother who wants this even more). She gets sent away to a (I think fictional) school called St. Matthews in upstate New York to give her a PG year providing crash course and SAT improvement, grade polishing, resume rounding etc. Excellent book in every way, by a very skilled writer who really knows this milieu. And it could even be instructive for those parents who are inclined to be pushing pretty strongly on their kids.

Bunting, who served in Vietnam also wrote The Lionheads, which has been called the best novel of Vietnam. It was not even in the Seattle Library, but I got a used copy on Amazon and am eagerly awaiting its arrival.

Josiah Bunting III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Old 10-15-2013, 10:03 AM   #1632
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I have begun re-reading Thomas Malory's Le Mort d'Arthur for the first time in over half a century.

What strikes me the most now (that didn't even occur to me as a teen) is how awful it must have been to be a woman back in those days compared with today. The role of women in society at that time was, appropriately, simply Medieval!

But to be honest, as a modern woman who has had so many opportunities in life, I am not so sure I want to read much more of this book for that reason.
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:57 PM   #1633
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The typical enjoyable crap that I like to read, Stephen King's Dr. Sleep. The sequel to The Shining. Not as good as the first, but a decent read.
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:32 PM   #1634
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I am a huge Sue Grafton fan so when her new book "W is for Wasted " came out I immediately bought it . What a disappointment ! It lacks something because it is not up to par with her other books .
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:49 PM   #1635
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I have begun re-reading Thomas Malory's Le Mort d'Arthur for the first time in over half a century.

What strikes me the most now (that didn't even occur to me as a teen) is how awful it must have been to be a woman back in those days compared with today. The role of women in society at that time was, appropriately, simply Medieval!

But to be honest, as a modern woman who has had so many opportunities in life, I am not so sure I want to read much more of this book for that reason.
Very awful - of course, it was pretty awful to be just about anybody at that time in history: Life Expectancy in the Middle Ages | Sarah Woodbury
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Old 10-16-2013, 11:47 AM   #1636
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Very awful - of course, it was pretty awful to be just about anybody at that time in history: Life Expectancy in the Middle Ages | Sarah Woodbury
So true! We have come such a long way since medieval times. Reading about life back then has not been as romantic and intriguing to me as I expected.

I was also pretty appalled a few years ago when going on a tour of a local (historical) plantation. The lives of even the plantation owner's family seemed miserable and appalling compared with what our modern civilization and technology has provided for us in the 21st century. Even just air conditioning and electric lights have made such a difference.
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Old 10-16-2013, 12:21 PM   #1637
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So true! We have come such a long way since medieval times. Reading about life back then has not been as romantic and intriguing to me as I expected.
two fun books to read about the middle ages are Ken Follet's Pillars of the Earth and World Without End. Both give interesting glimpses into what life might have been like at that time and have rich melodramatic characters and brisk moving action filled plots...surprisingly engaging about a topic I came to with little interest. (the first book is about an architect wanting to build a cathedral--Yawn- I thought --but could not put it down and was sorry when it ended 800+ pages later)
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Old 10-30-2013, 05:52 PM   #1638
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Almost finished with Tom Brokaw's The Greatest Generation and the The Greatest Generation Speaks, a section (book?) in the same book.

It reminds me of some of the hardships that I didn't learn about until I was in my 40's that my mother had to endure growing up in the Depression. Her father was a railroad brakeman and had to leave the job because of health issues. They never had to stand in bread lines but there were times they were only a few days away from that. It explained why she always kept enough canned food in the basement to feed an entire town. At least it seemed that way.

My father's family was only slightly better off. His father had a six-day-a-week job in a paper mill. Dad was partly deaf in one ear so he was an electrician on Coast Guard ships during the War.

It didn't matter if your job was "fulfilling" or allowed ER. If it put a roof overhead and food on the table it was a good job. That was the world my parents grew up in.

It makes me very appreciative for what they did.
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Old 10-31-2013, 02:14 PM   #1639
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The shoes of the fisherman, Morris West.
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Old 11-07-2013, 06:56 AM   #1640
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The Red Sparrow, by Jason Mathews, is a top notch spy procedural. Mathews couples 31 years of CIA clandestine operations with a deft pen to craft a novel I couldn't put down. I hope this guy has more in him like this.

The Red Sparrow of the title is a 26 year old Russian woman agent enlisted to track down a high level mole operating out of the Kremlin. She is targeted to co-opt the mole's young CIA handler who is targeted to co-opt her at the same time. The Kremlin has it's own high-level US mole so intelligence flowing back and forth keep the narrative tense. Lots of twists, fascinating characters, romance, betrayal, humor --- this book has everything a spy thriller should. If you like the genre put it on your must read list.
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