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Old 05-05-2015, 08:10 PM   #61
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Earl Campbell of college and pro football fame, getting to rescue his wife's cat out of a tree during a driving rain storm was pretty cool!
But on a more serious note, helping the victims of hurricane Katrina when they arrived in Austin was pretty high up there. One poor fellow, (who had to be in his eighties), was still wearing a life jacket when he came off of the plane. As soon as his feet hit the tarmac, he went to his knees, kissed the ground, looked up and shouted "Lord, thank you so much for bringing me to dry ground!" Choked me up, it was so surreal...
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:40 PM   #62
Recycles dryer sheets
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Nothing special, but I'm proud of doing some quality design work and having a few good ideas here and there. Being able to see what I design get built and used successfully was also a boost.
I'm most proud of being a good husband and making DW happy.
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Old 05-05-2015, 10:17 PM   #63
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Proud I was able to provide a decent living, while not neglecting my family. Now that all the smoke has cleared, my former occupation and accomplishments mean little to me, while my family now means everything. Coworkers were (for the most part) great, and I reminisce about the good times we had, but they are all gone now. Titles were nice at the time, but the further I rose in megacorp, the less happy I was, and these days nobody cares that I held this or that position.



This is worth watching- Ted Talk by Harvard Business Professor Clayton Christensen. (or if you prefer reading: HBR How will you measure your life)

Wow this blew me away great article.


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Old 05-06-2015, 07:16 AM   #64
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Proud I was able to provide a decent living, while not neglecting my family. Now that all the smoke has cleared, my former occupation and accomplishments mean little to me, while my family now means everything. Coworkers were (for the most part) great, and I reminisce about the good times we had, but they are all gone now. Titles were nice at the time, but the further I rose in megacorp, the less happy I was, and these days nobody cares that I held this or that position.

This is worth watching- Ted Talk by Harvard Business Professor Clayton Christensen. (or if you prefer reading: HBR How will you measure your life)
+1 that would be high on my list as well and also not giving into HR trying to force me to lower my performance appraisals for some very good direct reports.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:09 AM   #65
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I spent a significant part of my career as the night city editor of a metropolitan newspaper, directing a staff that chased breaking news on tight deadlines. I burned up a lot of adrenaline making quick decisions and working creatively under pressure. Best part of all, we started fresh every day, with a blank slate.

A lot of people regard a free press as essential to democracy. I like to think that's true, but I got into the field mainly to avoid boredom. It was fun to be on top of things as they were happening and to learn facts as they were being uncovered.
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Old 05-06-2015, 02:10 PM   #66
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Every project I headed was successful and I never got fired or laid off. They may have something to do with each other.
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Old 05-06-2015, 04:44 PM   #67
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I worked for 33 years, 3 in the Navy, and 30 for defense contractors. My most proud achievement was being a small part of successful effort to prevail in the Cold War. I was only a fiber in a rope, not a link in a chain. My contribution was not crucial, but I worked in a cause that had my full support. It didn't pay very well, but I lived modestly and retired young (age 53) anyway.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:01 PM   #68
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Someone recently asked me that thinking back on my whole career, what am I the most proud of. I thought for a little and said "being able to retire early". I sort of said this tongue in cheek, but upon later reflection, this is the truth. Sure, I had my moments, and have some certificates, awards, pins, etc. But that all pales in comparison to being able to RE (although a lot of that may be in hindsight - as time goes on, everything I did at work becomes less and less significant in my life). If someone had asked me that when I was still working, I probably would not have answered "Continuing down the path to retiring early at some point". What about others?
Absolutely. I'm also pretty proud of the book that many of this site's posters helped me write.

On the military career side:
The submarine force has a publication that lists lessons learned from the operations that "we do not discuss". Due to our nuclear-trained culture, it's mostly a recitation of the flawed logic and poor decisions which led to dire outcomes when we should've remained undetected. It also comments on bad teamwork and emotional responses to tactical situations. Over the last 40+ years that this collection of reports has been carried in classified safes, it's generally considered a Very Bad Thing to have your story in there. Your consolation is that you survived the events which got you written up in the first place.

When you even utter the title of this pub, submariners (particularly officers and sonar technicians) grimace and mutter an expletive. The analyses are written about the watchstander so the people are anonymous, but whenever you're training on one of the incidents from this pub (hopefully to avoid repeating it during your upcoming deployment), some grizzled steely-eyed killer of the deep always says "Yeah, that was Wild Bill Schmuckatelli on USETAFISH. We had a few brews at the club one night and he also said..." Again, while the lessons and the learning are critical, you don't want to be the guy who got into the pub in the first place.

Anyway one of my submarines was once, um, "conducting submerged operations and training in international waters", when we poked our noses into a tactically interesting situation. I was the Officer of the Deck and I unexpectedly turned it into one of those critical tactical situations that include the phrase "of great importance to national security" on the award citation. This time we managed to do everything right in a very urgent (but ultra quiet) hurry and we remained undetected while collecting a large database of... sensor data. We managed to help the intel analysts correlate a whole crapload of stuff that we really wished we hadn't been in a position to learn in the first place.

When we filed our mission report, someone at the analysis center thought it was important enough for the whole series of events to be written up in the pub. (Not my idea!) It included a lot of commentary about what can happen when you get aggressive about poking your nose into tactically interesting situations. Surprisingly, this time it said "The OOD executed all of the correct actions, and the watch team remained undetected while..." At the time it was the only chapter of the whole pub that admitted someone had somehow done something correctly.

And for a couple of years afterward, during our training seminars my fellow submariners would ask me "Hey Nords, that was you, right?"

That was a good feeling.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:10 PM   #69
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I think you get the prize for best story, Nords

Thanks for your service. (Couldn't find a "salute" smiley out there...)
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Old 05-08-2015, 02:59 PM   #70
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good story, but I was hoping it would end with "then we launched a fish in the butt of that commie boomer" or something....
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:56 PM   #71
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I think you get the prize for best story, Nords



Thanks for your service. (Couldn't find a "salute" smiley out there...)

There was a prize You should explain these things ahead of time! I could have done better! 😜
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Old 05-08-2015, 05:05 PM   #72
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I worked to keep the lights on.

The ability to retire at 55 was definitely a high point for me.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:48 PM   #73
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I think you get the prize for best story, Nords
Thanks. We really really didn't want to be there at the time, but these days the story gets better every time we don't tell it.

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good story, but I was hoping it would end with "then we launched a fish in the butt of that commie boomer" or something....
I can't discuss that, but we did update a lot of tactics publications.

And we had to sign affirmations that we wouldn't talk to these authors:
http://www.amazon.com/Blind-Mans-Blu...LGK/ref=sr_1_1
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What were/are you most proud of in your career?
Old 05-09-2015, 08:55 AM   #74
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What were/are you most proud of in your career?

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there was a prize You should explain these things ahead of time! I could have done better! 😜

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