Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-31-2015, 07:38 AM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,411
I've never heard of all the nuts coming off from driving. One perhaps, but not all four or five. The worst I have seen is one loose lug nut and we just tightened it up and checked all the others. Usually the car would drive but with a huge vibration long before the wheel comes off.

I have a sad wheel off story. A car in the northbound land of an interstate divided highway lost a wheel. It bounced across the median and struck a southbound car driven by a friend of mine in the driver's side windshield, killing him. We were in our early 30s at the time and he left a wife and two young kids.
__________________

__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-31-2015, 07:57 AM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,078
Quote:
Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
I've never heard of all the nuts coming off from driving. One perhaps, but not all four or five.
All the nuts don't have to come off to cause the loss of a wheel. This is a photo of the hub of my truck after losing a wheel while towing a trailer at 60 mph. Note the five lost/broken studs but only three missing nuts (yes, in addition to the driver ).
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_0117.jpg (554.0 KB, 12 views)
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 08:00 AM   #23
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 524
My close encounter with a wheel story.....6 or 7 years ago I was driving home after work. I came up behind a pick up truck pulling a tandem axel trailer with a small tractor loaded on it. I would estimate they were traveling about 50 mph at the time one of the left tires came off the trailer. I was sort of dumb struck as I saw the tire roll along side the trailer for a split second, then start bouncing, higher and higher until the last bounce was probably at least 30 feet in the air.

All this time I was laying on the brakes to avoid whatever might happen. The last I saw that tire was on that 30 ft. high bounce it hit the pavement just outside my drivers side door. It could not have missed my car more than 3 feet. I hate to think what the result would have been if that 80 to 100 lb tire had hit my roof or worse yet come thru the windshield.
__________________
***********
My motto is.... "a dollar saved is better than a dollar earned. I don't pay tax on the dollar I saved."
Tom52 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 08:01 AM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,411
Amazing that you would lose 3 of 8 nuts. What are the chances of that?
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 08:10 AM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,401
Yes, lonng before one gets down to the last nut coming off, the wobbling wheel would cause the studs to shear off, like in REWahoo's photo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christine View Post
... I did watch them working - the tool looked like a drill. Also on the wheel in question they needed extra force to get off the old nuts. So they used a long rod. They did the previous wheel change too as it is my regular garage.

Yes I did. I live in Norway and we all need to put on winter tires each fall. It's the law. And we all get told to check the wheel nuts after driving for a day or so. And that is what I did. Tried to tighten the nuts by hand. But they were all OK.
It's perfectly OK to use an impact wrench (compressed-air-driven drill-looking thing) to loosen the nuts. Any mechanic who uses it to tighten any nut, not just wheel lug nuts, should be shot immediately on the spot. As you have no control of the torque, you would either overtighten, or make it too loose. A torque wrench that measures the exact torque applied by hand is a MUST.

The long rod you saw is called a "breaker bar". It is used to apply more torque if one needs to remove an supertight nut by hand.
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 08:14 AM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,401
Rereading your post, I saw that they had problems removing the wheel. So, it is most likely that the lug nuts were overtightened before. Wheel studs that are overstressed like this should be replaced. The threads were stressed and later sheared off due to metal fatigue.
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 08:19 AM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,078
Quote:
Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
Amazing that you would lose 3 of 8 nuts. What are the chances of that?
Even more amazing to me was the fact two of the studs (at the 4 and 8 o'clock positions) had rusty surfaces indicating they had been cracked or broken for some time. Was this due to a defect in manufacturing? The truck was less than 6 months old and had only 9,000 miles on it at the time.

GM initially refused to take responsibility for the problem but I appealed to the district manager using this and other photos. I "suggested" to him the loss of the wheel was due to these two broken studs and was successful in getting a check for the $2K it cost to replace the hub, wheel and tire.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_0115.jpg (537.8 KB, 10 views)
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 12:25 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
Christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
Rereading your post, I saw that they had problems removing the wheel. So, it is most likely that the lug nuts were overtightened before. Wheel studs that are overstressed like this should be replaced. The threads were stressed and later sheared off due to metal fatigue.

Good point - thank you!
__________________
Christine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 02:58 PM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christine View Post
Good point - thank you!
That's what I'm thinking.

This happens too often! I was behind a car that lost a wheel at 60 mph. I couldn't believe it! In shock, I watched it all unfold in slow motion. The car gently pulled over: good driving, no snap actions. The wheel kept going. It went into the median, jumped the guardrail and then split the oncoming traffic before going off the other side and into the woods. Whew! That could have been a very nasty situation.
__________________
JoeWras is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 04:11 PM   #30
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,511
I got the lesson on the kinetic energy of a rolling tire when I was working at a gas station in 1967. Sunday or Saturday morning so traffic was very light, we heard a medium-sized truck coming, very noisy due to (we later figured out) the loose wheel that was about to come off. Right before us, the right front wheel comes off, rolling ~40 mph, and hit the side of a parked car, putting a huge dent in the car. It bounced around for a while longer, don't recall that it did any more damage, but I remember telling myself that if I ever saw a rolling tire, don't even think about getting in it's way to try stopping it.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 06:07 PM   #31
Recycles dryer sheets
SteveNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 313
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
Yes, lonng before one gets down to the last nut coming off, the wobbling wheel would cause the studs to shear off, like in REWahoo's photo.



It's perfectly OK to use an impact wrench (compressed-air-driven drill-looking thing) to loosen the nuts. Any mechanic who uses it to tighten any nut, not just wheel lug nuts, should be shot immediately on the spot. As you have no control of the torque, you would either overtighten, or make it too loose. A torque wrench that measures the exact torque applied by hand is a MUST.

The long rod you saw is called a "breaker bar". It is used to apply more torque if one needs to remove an supertight nut by hand.
Lots of shops use torque stix which are better than nothing. Too many just crank em down with their impact guns though.

Last time I got tires on my truck they had to use a six foot breaker bar to get some of the lugnuts off 😯

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Early Retirement Forum mobile app
__________________

__________________
SteveNU is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My turn again - Dad fell and broke his hip Sue J Life after FIRE 55 01-13-2012 04:52 PM
One Man's Tale of Avoiding the Hamster Wheel plsprius Life after FIRE 19 08-04-2008 09:37 PM
Vanguard fund vtovx fell over 3 percent yesterday?? dpeters3 FIRE and Money 9 12-29-2006 04:26 PM
DCA or one fell swoop? Rich_by_the_Bay FIRE and Money 46 08-24-2006 12:14 PM
Fell off Ladder - What an Idiot! TromboneAl Other topics 12 06-24-2005 07:13 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:23 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.