Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-03-2011, 08:07 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
...

Unless you have money you are really eager to burn, just go to Trader Joe and buy some nice quick-frozen Alaskan Sockeye. Japanese consumers are very particular about their fish, and they are not poor, and they buy a great deal of this very same frozen Alaskan sockeye salmon.

Ha
Lots of good info on salmon here from many posters, but I'll just quote this one to post my question:

First, I'm as far from a connoisseur regarding fish as you can get. DW cooks salmon just about every week though and we enjoy it. Generally getting the salmon from Costco, and we have gotten both the wild and farm raised. Going from memory here, but it seems the farm raised is light pink (from dye in the food as listed on the package) and 'mushier' than the wild. The wild is almost red, and firm and maybe a bit 'drier' when cooked. Taste seems to follow those descriptions also. DW actually preferred the farm raised, as it was what she was accustomed to. I can see where the wild is considered a better product, but it wasn't a go-no-go for me.

So I'm curious about this frozen product from Trader Joe's. Would I expect this frozen Alaskan Sockeye to be better than the Costco farm raised we can get here? Maybe the price is much more, I don't even know what we pay for salmon, but I could compare next time I'm out.

Smoked salmon is a whole 'nother thing. DW started me on it, and it was an acquired taste for me, but I love all kinds of smoked salmon and esp smoked trout now. mmmmmmmmmmm

-ERD50
__________________

__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-03-2011, 08:50 PM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
So I'm curious about this frozen product from Trader Joe's. Would I expect this frozen Alaskan Sockeye to be better than the Costco farm raised we can get here? Maybe the price is much more, I don't even know what we pay for salmon, but I could compare next time I'm out.

-ERD50
If or your wife prefer farmed fish, or are indifferent as to wild/farmed, I don't think that the Trader Joe product I mentioned would be a definite step up for you. It's just like fresh sockeye ( the deep red stuff), but not quite as good because for me at least it is harder to prepare frozen fish. I just think it is a very good source for people who want wild fish, and do not live in a NW city and who do have a Trader Joe store nearby. Trader Joe stores are sometimes easier for city dwellers than Costco, and it can be a less overwhelming task to get there and get home.

Frozen fish can be great, for example if you are going to fry it. I've been to fish fries in Texas where the fish were caught over several weeks and frozen. Also my wife was good at broiling salmon steaks that we would cut from a whole fish and freeze. But I just don't have the knack. Another interesting fact is that the most expensive fish around (and tastiest!), that which is used in sushi and sashimi, is almost all frozen. A sushi chef told me it was all frozen, and it likely is, but I believe that the deep red tuna called maguro is not required by law to be frozen before being served. All the other finfish intended to be eaten raw must be frozen.

From others' comments I get the idea that sometimes at least, good fresh wild fish is available pretty much all over the country. I never see it when I visit my sister in the midwest, or my brother in Ft Worth. And I never saw north pacific fish when I lived in SoCal. I shopped in Chinatown and mostly saw seabass, snapper, tuna and other local fish, but that was along time ago.

BTW, not all wild salmon is deep red. Both Coho and kings are lighter in color than sockeye, but they do not have that striped look of farmed fish.

I just fixed a 1.5# sockeye filet I bought last night. Where I live now I cannot grill without going to a bit of trouble, so my favorite way to prepare is poached. I fill a fish poacher or a big tightly covered skillet with as much water as it will hold and still leave room for the fish without overflowing. I put a little celery, onion and carrot in, and bring it to a hard boil. Then I cut off the heat, and add the fish and set a timer for 20' or so. When it dings, I take it out, check to be sure it is done, and strip the skin off. This step is very easy while still hot, but much messier after it has cooled.

I eat it either hot, or after chilling with mayo and lemon or any other sauce. If I am going to have a party, I use a whole fish about 4-5#, and use my fish poacher the same way.

Ha
__________________

__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 09:29 PM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50
So I'm curious about this frozen product from Trader Joe's...
If or your wife prefer farmed fish, or are indifferent as to wild/farmed, I don't think that the Trader Joe product I mentioned would be a definite step up for you.
Actually, I think DW prefers the wild now, it was just a little bit of getting accustomed to the difference. But yes, it isn't a huge deal to us - more important that it is cooked properly (she almost always grills it over charcoal, dill, lemon, and other things). She's never sure if it's done though, and always asks me to check, and it seems reliable to catch it just as it is 'flaking'.


Quote:
From others' comments I get the idea that sometimes at least, good fresh wild fish is available pretty much all over the country. I never see it when I visit my sister in the midwest, or my brother in Ft Worth.
It might be that what we would call 'good and fresh' would not meet the standards of someone on the coasts. I'm that way with sweet corn, people will say 'yummm, so good' to stuff I wouldn't even think of putting in my mouth (if it looks bad, shriveled, dry kernels, it's not going to taste good). If it's mediocre corn, squeeze some fresh lime juice, salt & butter and hot sauce on it for something tasty. If it is fresh and a good ear, salt, butter and pepper only. When we lived on a farm, 'fresh' meant picked within a few hours of dinner - if it was picked earlier to sell at the stand, we went out and got 'fresh' corn for dinner. Anything left at the end of the day was fed to the cattle, our customers only got fresh corn.


Quote:
Where I live now I cannot grill without going to a bit of trouble, so my favorite way to prepare is poached. ...

I eat it either hot, or after chilling with mayo and lemon or any other sauce.

Ha
I think poaching can work well, but DW isn't so fond of it. I think it's especially good poached when you are using it as you say - served cold later with mayo & lemon, maybe capers. It seems to hold up well to that.

Thanks for the fish info, we really need to work more of it into our menu.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 09:34 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
When it's too hot (like now) to grill outdoors, I use a cast iron griddle on the gas range. My rule is cook about a third of the way through, flip, and cook another two-thirds, leaving the center pink. Yum! Seasonings might include lemon pepper, ginger, cajun spices, or all the above...
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 09:55 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,925
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
So I'm curious about this frozen product from Trader Joe's. Would I expect this frozen Alaskan Sockeye to be better than the Costco farm raised we can get here? Maybe the price is much more, I don't even know what we pay for salmon, but I could compare next time I'm out.

-ERD50
Just to add to what haha already said, this question is kind of comparing apples and oranges........sockeye (wild/red/less fat) vs Atlantic(farmed/dyed light pink/more fat). I personally like wild king (chinooks) but unless we catch them ourself and charge to the recreation budget, I find it hard to pay market price for them (probably >$15/lb). My second preference is the Atlantic because of the fat.......though I have to suppress the idea that contaminants concentrate in the fat and that dyes are petroleum products (I was surprised when I read that; correct me if wrong). The higher fat content makes it much more forgiving when cooking......harder to overcook).

Perhaps a fairer comparison would be to compare the fresh sockeye vs
the frozen sockeye. In principle, fresh is better since the freezing/thawing process causes some degradation in quality. In reality, you have the compensating factor that most "fresh" fish are mostly fresh in the sense of
not being frozen and not necessarily that they are fresh in the common meaning of the word. I hope that I won't destroy your fish-eating forever but I have come the conclusion that the supply chain time for fresh fish makes it hard to prevent some degradation (or more) of quality. I don't know if fish outgas but every time I unwrap fresh fish from butcher (waxed) paper, I always smell some degree of unpleasantness and I have never smelled that from fresh or fresh frozen thawed fish. There probably is a lot of variation in that "fresh" quality and so I suspect that a well controlled flash freezing process (I suspect true for TJ) could be better/more consistent than fresh.
__________________
kaneohe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 10:43 PM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
Dad worked in the Fulton fish market for north of 30 years (don't ask) and I was spoiled rotten with the best fish from childhood on. We also fished fresh and saltwater nearly to the point of compulsion and dad continues to do so. Fresh is fresh only if it is fresh. If you don't have access to a top shelf fish market, you would probably be better off with frozen. We had lovely dry scallops for dinner tonight here in Colorado, but I searched out one of the better/best retail fish markets here, drove out of my way to get there (in a raging thunderstorm), and turned my nose up at half or more of what they were selling. In contrast, when I go to Costco I can buy salmon or (to my surprise locally) wahoo in flash frozen, cryo-vacced individual servings that are perfectly acceptable (to my standards), if not up to the level of the really fresh fresh stuf.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 07:41 AM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewer12345 View Post
Dad worked in the Fulton fish market for north of 30 years (don't ask) and I was spoiled rotten with the best fish from childhood on. We also fished fresh and saltwater nearly to the point of compulsion and dad continues to do so.
I can sure relate to that. Growing up near Sheepshead Bay, we ate more fish than meat, much of it caught ourselves.

Another source of good fish I just thought of. We have an Asian supermarket in Cincinnati, and I suppose many cities do. They usually have a truly awesome supply of frozen fish of all kinds, and most of it seems to be very good quality.
__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 08:55 AM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
youbet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 9,965
The salmon we eat is primarily coho from the Great Lakes. Trout is from the White River system in northen Arkansas.

We haven't been doing as much salmon/trout fishing as in the past so currently the freezer is stocked primarily with the usual "Up Nort" gamefish: walleye, northern pike, crappie, perch and bass.

We're packing for a trip to northern Minnesota right now. Despite August not being prime fishing time, we always do well on this lake. Fishing was so good on the early June trip this year, we had limits in the freezer and were catch-and-release fishing by mid-week.

We'll be trout fishing in southern Missouri (Current and Jacks Fork rivers) and northern Arkansas (White River system) this autumn.

We enjoy a variety of commercially caught fish and seafood, but when fishing is one of your hobbies you don't get many chances to partake at the seafood counter at the local market.
__________________
"I wasn't born blue blood. I was born blue-collar." John Wort Hannam
youbet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 09:08 AM   #29
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
if you know what these different fish look like, you cannot be fooled. To the best of my knowledge, the only US farmed salmon is Atlantic salmon. Sockeye, king, silver (coho) are all wild.

Look at the filet- if it has big whitish fat separating the myotomes, it is farmed Atlantic salmon. It may be farmed in BC, but it is still Atlantic Salmon. If it is a deep ruby red, and it looks as if the fish might have weighed 4-8 pounds whole, it is sockeye, always wild.

Learn to recognize what fish looks like and you will be fraud proof.

Same goes for meat. I see shoppers who are plenty old enough to have figured out what they are buying ask the butcher amazing questions.

There are places for trust( like mutual fund salesmen) , but not meat or fish counters.

Ha
Absolutely true. I can tell simply by looking at it whether it was Wild or Farm Raised.

I am telling you all, try cooking the salmon on your George Foreman. It does a great job at it and you only need to lightly spray the surface with some Pam. No added calories from butter, oil, etc....
__________________
skyvue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 11:22 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,913
Here is my husband's favorite salmon fishing photo, Kenai River:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Big Salmon light.jpg (723.3 KB, 5 views)
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 11:47 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,323
You folks that grew up getting fresh fish...how lucky!!! I'm jealous. Not much fresh fish in the Midwest...unless you're into catfish with all the toxins in it which I love regardless, tho.
__________________
Please consider adopting a rescue animal. So very many need a furr-ever home and someone to love them! And if we all spay/neuter our pets there won't be an overpopulation to put to death.
Orchidflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 01:08 PM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
I can honestly say that I didn't notice the difference between the taste of this fish,

salmon3.jpg

that couldn't have been fresher, and the taste of farmed salmon that the grocery store got from Chile.

I'm good at telling how fresh a fish is (e.g. zero smell versus fishy smell), but the very fresh fish don't taste much better. I've even had previously frozen fish that taste great.

IOW, I think there's a significant placebo effect here, and I no longer worry if the fish I buy isn't super fresh.
__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 02:32 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Naples
Posts: 2,161
Went to Costco this morning for some shopping. After reading this thread, I was especially interested in fresh wild salmon. They had both the wild salmon and farm raised. Boy, the wild just looks so much better, probably the nice red coloring to the flesh whereas the farm raised looks more of a coral color. We're used to the farm raised. Decided to buy both. The wild was $7.99/lb and the farm raised was $6.99/lb. What I do like about the farm raised is that there is no skin. I can grill this in baskets, rotate it on the grille easily and get it browned on both sides. With the skin on, I put it skin down on aluminum foil and grille until it's done and then use a spatula, slide the flesh off the skin which sticks to the aluminum foil. I prefer the grilling in the baskets, but now that I have both on hand, I'll see if there is much difference. I'm kind of in T'Al's corner. Don't know if I'll be able to tell much difference.
__________________
JOHNNIE36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 06:38 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
You can get good at removing the skin. I almost always do it. Use a sharp filet knife. You can also buy a tool that does it.

If I spray the grill with Pam, and use a monster spatula, I rarely have trouble flipping it.

You probably know that the red color comes from pigments in the crustaceans that the wild salmon eat. When the packaging says "color added" it means that the farmers add those pigments to the food pellets that they feed to the fish.
__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 10:48 PM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
The skin is "good fat".
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2011, 07:36 AM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,589
I don't know about the nutritional aspects of the skin, but as someone who has eaten a lot of fish all my life, I've always eaten and enjoyed the skin. I've never understood why anyone wouldn't.
__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2011, 07:46 AM   #37
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: dubuque
Posts: 618
"he best wild Alaskan salmon I have had is caught by yours truly.
Also halibut. What we sent to Trappers Creek for smoking was out of this world.
Course the price was a bit more but included a lot of great scenery and bear watching. Going again in a couple of week." where did you go salmon fishing? have always wanted to go but never had the chance. do you use some service or guide to set it up? let me know.
__________________
frank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2011, 07:54 AM   #38
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by braumeister View Post
I don't know about the nutritional aspects of the skin, but as someone who has eaten a lot of fish all my life, I've always eaten and enjoyed the skin. I've never understood why anyone wouldn't.
Crispy salmon skin. Ummm. That is a dish in itself in Japan. Tasty and nutritious.
__________________
MichaelB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2011, 09:42 AM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNNIE36 View Post
Went to Costco this morning for some shopping. After reading this thread, I was especially interested in fresh wild salmon. They had both the wild salmon and farm raised. Boy, the wild just looks so much better, probably the nice red coloring to the flesh whereas the farm raised looks more of a coral color. We're used to the farm raised. Decided to buy both. The wild was $7.99/lb and the farm raised was $6.99/lb. What I do like about the farm raised is that there is no skin. I can grill this in baskets, rotate it on the grille easily and get it browned on both sides. With the skin on, I put it skin down on aluminum foil and grille until it's done and then use a spatula, slide the flesh off the skin which sticks to the aluminum foil. I prefer the grilling in the baskets, but now that I have both on hand, I'll see if there is much difference. I'm kind of in T'Al's corner. Don't know if I'll be able to tell much difference.
What's your report?
__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2011, 01:26 PM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Naples
Posts: 2,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
What's your report?

Haven't tried it yet Al. Decided we had a lot of leftovers to get rid of first. I'll be sure to let you know our opinion when we do the first grilling.
I guess the best way to compare is to grille both types on the same day using the same seasoning. The farm raised will be grilled in the basket and the wild salmon will be done on the aluminum foil, both methods we have used before. Don't want to introduce anything new. My prediction is that I will like the wild and DW will like the farm raised just because of the grilling in the basket. We've used that method for the last two years and DW loves it. She doesn't like change: except when it comes to furniture. That's different. Stay tuned.
__________________

__________________
JOHNNIE36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Considering selling TIPS and buying Treasuries Today Safe Harbour FIRE and Money 3 08-01-2011 11:46 AM
Buying a car for the first time and need one quickly plex Other topics 14 06-30-2011 08:16 PM
CSCO, Anyone Buying James5v Stock Picking and Market Strategy 13 06-29-2011 08:35 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:12 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.