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Wolf Dogs
Old 12-20-2009, 10:37 AM   #1
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Wolf Dogs

A few nights ago, around midnight, we were awakened by some heavy outside animal breathing and then some loud barking. I turned on the outside light, and saw these two animals, and thought "If I didn't know better, I'd say that those are wolves."

I finally tracked down the owner, and it turns out that they are wolf dogs (part wolf, part dog) and only 7 months old. I actually met of these a few weeks ago, when I walked out the door, and one of them was right there. We both jumped about a foot. He was skittish but friendly, and let me pet him a little. He was really fast, and "springy."

The owner has a kennel, but apparently they escape now and then, and there have been a lot of complaints from the neighbors.

They look very much like this:


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Old 12-20-2009, 10:53 AM   #2
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Watch out for waxed shirtless teenage boys hanging around, that and crowds of mooning twinkies or twirps or somesuch. Just saying.

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Old 12-20-2009, 11:14 AM   #3
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Back in the late '60s, my cousin who lived up the street from me, had a wolf dog...Tinker. He got it when it was only a little puppy, and in the beginning Tinker was a nice friendly, playful ball o' fur. However, as time went on and it got older, it's natural wolf tendencies took over, and it became one of the meanest, most vicious animals I've ever seen. It was always treated very good, and was never abused or mistreated...it's just that a wild animal will always be a wild animal. And it may be a happy, playful thing for quite some time, but someday it may, and most likely will, return to it's built-in natural instincts.

After several incidents of aggression, ol' Tinker finally had to be put down. And although my cousin understood why it had to be done, he was nonetheless devastated by it.....until my aunt brought home 2 cute little beagles for him!
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Old 12-20-2009, 12:15 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Goonie View Post
Back in the late '60s, my cousin who lived up the street from me, had a wolf dog...Tinker. He got it when it was only a little puppy, and in the beginning Tinker was a nice friendly, playful ball o' fur. However, as time went on and it got older, it's natural wolf tendencies took over, and it became one of the meanest, most vicious animals I've ever seen. It was always treated very good, and was never abused or mistreated...it's just that a wild animal will always be a wild animal. And it may be a happy, playful thing for quite some time, but someday it may, and most likely will, return to it's built-in natural instincts.

After several incidents of aggression, ol' Tinker finally had to be put down. And although my cousin understood why it had to be done, he was nonetheless devastated by it.....until my aunt brought home 2 cute little beagles for him!
When I was a kid a neighbor had a pet raccoon and the same thing happened - started out as a barrel of fun baby and ended up a snarling dervish. I'd be cautious of those dogs, especially together.
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Old 12-20-2009, 12:34 PM   #5
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Reminds one about the lady who's face and hands were ripped off by her friend's Chimpanzee.

Let me google that for you
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Old 12-20-2009, 01:26 PM   #6
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Never underestimate an angry Chihuahua....

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Old 12-20-2009, 01:44 PM   #7
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Dog photo threat!! Edit: I meant "dog photo thread!!" Wish I had a photo of the giant bear-size dog we see around the neighborhood. He has very long fur and his people take him to the groomers often.

There is a beautiful well-behaved dog in my bldg. that looks like part wolf (also no photo), even his name indicates a wolfish origin. Some of the neighbors tried to run him out of the bldg because he barks. duh.

Urban phenomenon: Why is it that people name their wireless connections after their dogs, they might as well call it “Joe’s Network in Apt. 306.” I re-named mine from my actual name to my apt’s nickname which the neighbors don’t know, I think.

I don't have a dog, this guy awaits his people at the store:
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Old 12-20-2009, 03:54 PM   #8
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Never underestimate an angry Chihuahua....
No Kidding. We babysat a chihuahua for a few months. Here is Paco 'attacking' 120 lb Moxie, Paco losing, all quiet later.
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Old 12-20-2009, 03:59 PM   #9
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Oh CI.....

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Old 12-20-2009, 04:52 PM   #10
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DD lives in a remote northern community where wolves and dogs are both common. She says that (unfixed) dogs have two things on their minds, food and procreation, wolves have one, food. For every person who claims their (female) dog was seduced by a big bad wolf there are 100 who claim their dog was eaten by one (or many).

I googled "wolf dog hybrid" and was surprised to find this. Seems humans aren't they only ones to try "getting it on with what's available".
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Old 12-20-2009, 06:07 PM   #11
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Having a wolf-dog hybrid as a pet is a very bad idea. Owning and breeding wolf-dog hybrids is prohibited in at least 40 states, for good reason (you might want to check out the laws regarding their ownership in your state, Al). They may be beautiful in appearance, but these animals are unpredictable in behavior, and can become very aggressive as adults.

Here is what the Wisconsin Wolf Management Plan has to say about wolf-dog hybrids:

Wolf-Dog Hybrids and Captive Wolves
A wolf-dog hybrid is the offspring of the mating of a wolf (Canis lupus) with a domestic dog (Canis familiaris). Normally these are bred in captivity because wild wolves rarely breed with dogs. These animals have rapidly grown in popularity in the late 1980's and 1990's and seem to be the pet of choice for a growing segment of the public that wants a pet that is different, intelligent, semi-wild, and independent. The characteristics of wolf/dog hybrids make them highly desirable to some people but also highly unpredictable. Estimates of the number of privately owned hybrids in this country run as high as 400,000 (Hope 1994).
The normal "predatory behaviors" of wild predators like the gray wolf have been lost in most domestic dogs. However, in hybrids these instincts are present to varying degrees yet the animals commonly lack a fear of humans.
Attacks, maulings, dismemberment's and deaths caused by wolf/dog hybrids have received national media attention. Four children are known to have been killed by hybrids between 1981 and 1988. The death of a four year old in Florida in August of 1988 seemed to heighten media attention on this subject. In this case a publicly trusted institution--an animal shelter--featured a hybrid as the "pet of the week". Two hours after the animal had been brought to it's adoptive home, it killed the neighbor's child. The shelter paid a $425,000 settlement to the boy's family. This tragedy set a national precedent for animal shelters/agencies: wolf/dog hybrids are to be put down or returned to their original owner, but are not to be adopted out to an uneducated, unsuspecting public.
This precedent makes it very difficult for distressed owners of unmanageable adult wolf/dog hybrids to find a "good home" for the animal they still love but just can't live with anymore. There are numerous wolf and wolf/dog hybrid shelters throughout the country, however, space is limited and such shelters are often filled. Unfortunately for the animals and the reputation of wild wolves, many overwhelmed hybrid owners resort to "setting their wolf free" when they cannot find a suitable home for them. These freed hybrids however lack the hunting skills and pack structure needed to survive by hunting wild prey. When these animals become hungry they instinctively return to humans for food, invariably get into trouble and often are shot to death by local enforcement officers. There have been twenty-one cases of free-roaming wolf/dog hybrids in Wisconsin between 1989 and 1998.
Free-roaming hybrids, and the problems they cause give wild wolves a bad reputation. Wildlife biologists may spend an extensive amount of time attempting to identify wolf-dog hybrids, document problems, and attempt to rectify such problems, which diverts time and expenses from management of wild wolves.
Wildlife biologists are concerned about escaped or released wolf/dog hybrids interbreeding with wild wolves--diluting the gene pool with the instincts and behaviors of domestic dogs (Hope 1994). Dog genes in a wolf population may reduce long term viability and increase rates of livestock depredation.
Attacks on humans by captive wolves and wolf/dog hybrids will continue to contribute to a negative image of wolves to the public. Additionally, released/escaped hybrids have the potential of destroying the genetic purity and hence, the legal status, of wild wolves in Wisconsin.
Possession of wolf/dog hybrids needs to be regulated due to their potential impact on wild, free ranging wolves.
Free-roaming wolf-dog hybrids trapped at depredation sites will be euthanized unless collars provide the identification of an owner. The owner of such an animal may be responsible for the cost of depredations. Legislative authority will be sought to allow Wisconsin Conservation Wardens to destroy free-roaming wolf-dog hybrids. Local law enforcement officers may kill animals which cause a substantial risk or threat to human life by attack or aggressive behavior.
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Old 12-20-2009, 06:33 PM   #12
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Dog photo threat!! Edit: I meant "dog photo thread!!" Wish I had a photo of the giant bear-size dog we see around the neighborhood. He has very long fur and his people take him to the groomers often.

There is a beautiful well-behaved dog in my bldg. that looks like part wolf (also no photo), even his name indicates a wolfish origin. Some of the neighbors tried to run him out of the bldg because he barks. duh.

Urban phenomenon: Why is it that people name their wireless connections after their dogs, they might as well call it “Joe’s Network in Apt. 306.” I re-named mine from my actual name to my apt’s nickname which the neighbors don’t know, I think.

I don't have a dog, this guy awaits his people at the store:
Awwww.....loyal companion. Here is a pic of my good buddy. As far as wolf dogs are concerned, I would try to stay on their good side.
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Old 12-20-2009, 07:09 PM   #13
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Why would anyone, living in the litigious society we have become, want to own a pet with a real or perceived proclivity to inflict grievous bodily harm?
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Old 12-20-2009, 08:03 PM   #14
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Old 12-21-2009, 04:35 AM   #15
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I would be very disturbed if these wolf dogs were in my neighborhood. What are people thinking? Well, I guess they are not. They are the same ones in many instances that have these giant snakes around children no doubt.
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Old 12-21-2009, 07:04 AM   #16
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My mother had two wolfdogs, the mama and the baby dog, for years and years as outside dogs. Very protective of her. Never had any trouble with either of them....must have been 2nd or 3rd generation I suspect. She still talks about them alot as they really were loyal to each other.
After reading these articles, Mom was pretty lucky I guess.
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:42 AM   #17
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Cool looking "dogs", but I don't believe I would want one that wasn't at least three or so generations after the original mating with a wolf.

Canis familiaris has been bred to accept humans not only as fellow pack members, but as the "big dog" in the pack. Wolf dogs might be able to accept me as a fellow pack member, but I don't think they will easily accept me as dominant.

Instead of the "big dog", I might be seen as more like that weird cousin from Jersey that was never all that well-liked and might have to be eaten if I get to be too big of a pain in the butt.

Any breed of dog is likely to want to go after a human under the right circumstances. Some breeds are more dangerous because they are just bigger, have more powerful jaw muscles, etc. But I think the wolf-dogs would be more likely to see humans as prey, or an illegitimate competitor for prey.
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:57 AM   #18
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I'll see if I can find out if they are first-generation wolfdogs, which are illegal in California.
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Old 12-21-2009, 01:24 PM   #19
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I googled "wolf dog hybrid" and was surprised to find this. Seems humans aren't they only ones to try "getting it on with what's available".
Gee, that was a scary article. Wolf-dog hybrids rank #6 in aggressive attacks despite being a tiny (barely over zero) percent of the doggie population. And, their favorite munchie is small children........

Sounds like wolf-dog hybrid owners should face stiff penalties if their dogs run free, purposely or accidentally. And bear full responsibility if the animal hurts/kills someone with the punishment being the same as if they committed the crime themselves.

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Between 1981 and 1999, there were 38 severe attacks and 13 fatalities caused by wolf hybrids in North America, with all victims being children.[30]
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Old 12-21-2009, 04:00 PM   #20
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Who needs a hybrid when you can have the real thing in your backyard:

Where for art thou Romeo? Juneau’s lone wolf elusive as ever - KTUU.com | Alaska's news and information source |





I've had two encounters with Romeo. The first was when he stalked us about 100' behind us, wanting to visit with our dogs. The second was on a trail where he was following another dog walker and was less than 25' away. He's been known to take small dogs home for dinner, but seems to want companionship of larger dogs. Of course there are a few idiots who tried to get him to mate with their dogs. I haven't heard if he's back this winter, but it's still early.
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