Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-28-2009, 05:35 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,925
When you use the plank, do you
1) put fish on plank, put plank on grill or
2) put plank on grill to "ignite", wait x min, then put fish on plank?
__________________

__________________
kaneohe is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-28-2009, 06:33 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohe View Post
When you use the plank, do you
1) put fish on plank, put plank on grill or
2) put plank on grill to "ignite", wait x min, then put fish on plank?

I let the plank get about a 3 minute head start after grill has come up to temperature. Then put the salmon on. Got a bit charred yesterday more than normal.
__________________

__________________
Notmuchlonger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2009, 07:26 PM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohe View Post
When you use the plank, do you
1) put fish on plank, put plank on grill or
2) put plank on grill to "ignite", wait x min, then put fish on plank?
The instructions I have been following say to heat the grill to aprox 350 degrees. Put the plank on the grill to preheat it for 3 minutes or until a light smoke appears. Then flip the plank over (using tongs) and put the fish on the preheated side of the plank. Close lid and cook.

A properly soaked plank should not ignite, but you should always be close to the grill and have a water bottle handy just in case. Also, be careful where you put the hot plank once you take it off the grill.

Audrey
__________________
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2009, 09:22 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,925
Thanks for spilling your secrets, A & NML........should have asked yesterday.
Inspired by your tales and having recently discovered where the remaining 3 boards
from a set purchased many yrs. ago had taken refuge, I made an unsuccessful attempt today.......I didn't give the plank a head start so it didn't smoke very much and it also got warped. Not sure why it warped.....I did cut the board in half thinking to get 2x as many pieces ; also soaked it for about 6-7 hrs and removed it from soak about 1 hr
before use; also put salmon in alum foil "cup" to contain sauce/glaze and fish juices.
Also done over direct heat. Fish was fine, just no planked taste....also took forever
which is my experience .....about 27 min.

Looking for suggestions.......when I did my first planking yrs ago didn't have trouble w/
warping or getting plank to smoke but might have been using instructions that came w/
plank which are long gone........
__________________
kaneohe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 07:44 AM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Ed_The_Gypsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: the City of Subdued Excitement
Posts: 5,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
I have not grilled salmon on planks, but have learned this trick from a cookbook: salmon on aluminum foil, skin side down. The advantage is that the foil spreads the heat for even cooking, keeps the fish from burning, and sticks to the skin making removal of the latter after grilling a cinch. Curving the foil also helps holding in any basting sauce you fancy to use.
My father experimented with cooking salmon for many years (we ate a lot of salmon) and liked this method the best. We haven't found a better way yet.
__________________
my bumpersticker:
"I am not in a hurry.
I am retired.
And I don't care how big your truck is."
Ed_The_Gypsy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 09:00 AM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,457
Kaneohe - my boards warp after soaking. I just put the fish on the convex side and let the juices run off. The way my grill is designed run-off doesn't cause flare-ups because the burner under the grill is not exposed (i.e. the grates are solid just over the burner).

I've been served planked fish in restaurants where the board was warped - so I don't think it is unusual at all. In fact one fine dining restaurant in Missoula MT was using 1" thick cedar planks (wow!) and it was warped!

I don't get a super strong wood flavor in the food - it's more subtle. But it sure smells good while it's cooking and the house (uh, motorhome) smells great after the food on plank is brought inside. I've only used alder so far. I expect giving the plank a "head start" preheating helps with the smoke flavor. And having the fish in direct contact with the wood is probably important. Still, I think it is going to be a gentle flavor.

Soaked wood chips (in a metal box) under the grill is very effective for a strong smoke flavor (no plank - just direct heat grilling). The way the Weber Baby Q is designed I don't think this is an option for me now, but I did it with a larger gas grill I owned a long time ago and it worked very well.

Cooking time depends on how big the piece is. Most recipes I've read for salmon fillets to cook for 15 mins, so yes it's slow. I did whole 2 pound fillet the other day and it took 25 mins. I don't see a problem with the longer cooking times unless you are in a hurry.

But definitely preheat that plank! 3 mins minimum. This also helps disinfect the cooking surface and then turn the plank over so that the fish is put on the hot surface. Might save a few minutes cooking time too!

Considering I've only cooked fish on a plank twice myself, I'm not an expert yet! Just been reading about it a great deal for the past week.

Audrey
__________________
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 01:07 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,925
Audrey.......thanks for the info. Much appreciated. So sounds like
1) 3+ min head start for plank
2) Turn over
3) No foil...direct contact
4) subtle flavor and long times expected (useful to know)

.....just one step behind you
__________________
kaneohe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 04:11 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 197
What do you soak the planks in?
__________________
RedHawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 04:12 PM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjpatt View Post
What do you soak the planks in?
water
__________________
Notmuchlonger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 07:42 PM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
I've done this a few times, and concluded that there was very little flavor added to the fish from the plank. I get better grilled flavor if the juice from the salmon drips into the grill and the surface of the fish is actually exposed to some flames. On a plank, you may as well cook the fish in the dishwasher, which is an even better crowd pleaser than the plank method.

And while I'm being a naysayer, soak your wood for a few hours and then cut it with a saw. You'll see that the water only penetrates a microscopic amount into the wood. When I smoke things, I don't bother to soak the wood chips.

Sorry for the negativity.
__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 07:44 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
I've done this a few times, and concluded that there was very little flavor added to the fish from the plank. I get better grilled flavor if the juice from the salmon drips into the grill and the surface of the fish is actually exposed to some flames. On a plank, you may as well cook the fish in the dishwasher, which is an even better crowd pleaser than the plank method.

And while I'm being a naysayer, soak your wood for a few hours and then cut it with a saw. You'll see that the water only penetrates a microscopic amount into the wood. When I smoke things, I don't bother to soak the wood chips.

Sorry for the negativity.
Its ok to have an opinion and be wrong.
__________________
Notmuchlonger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 08:51 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Naples
Posts: 2,161
I have had success grilling salmon two ways. Early on I bought the salmon with the skin on and there was only one way for me to do it. I make a rectangular tray out of aluminum foil and put the salmon in the tray skin down. Two trays, one for DW and one for me. Spray butter, lemon and Old Bay seasoning. Grill on medium until you can see the edges of the salmon starting to get dark (like burn). The skin will stick to the aluminum foil. With a spatula, slide the salmon off the skin and serve. Works great. Later on I found salmon at Costco without the skin. I purchased two football shaped wire baskets and I just cut the salmon to fit the baskets. Season however you want and you can turn the baskets on the grille to the desired temperature. I like this method best as there is less prep time (no aluminum trays to make up) and I just put the wire baskets in the dishwasher. Some additional cleaning required. DW prefers this method as she likes thinks well done and I get better results with the wire baskets.
__________________
JOHNNIE36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2009, 10:38 PM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
I've done this a few times, and concluded that there was very little flavor added to the fish from the plank. I get better grilled flavor if the juice from the salmon drips into the grill and the surface of the fish is actually exposed to some flames. On a plank, you may as well cook the fish in the dishwasher, which is an even better crowd pleaser than the plank method.

And while I'm being a naysayer, soak your wood for a few hours and then cut it with a saw. You'll see that the water only penetrates a microscopic amount into the wood. When I smoke things, I don't bother to soak the wood chips.

Sorry for the negativity.
No prob Al! Grilling this way solves several problems for me given the limitations of my particular grill, and I did get some nice smoke smell/flavor.

Unfortunately, I don't have a way to smoke stuff with my set-up.

Audrey
__________________
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 08:50 AM   #34
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,424
Hey Audreyh1, great thread.

We have had mixed results with cedar planks. The tip on preheating one side looks good -we'll try next time.

What planks did you use? We've had mixed results which I'm certain are the result of planks used. (Certainly can;t be my world class grilling skills ) Some were quite thin and burned easily, some smell like they are treated wood ...you get the picture.
__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 03:02 PM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Hey Audreyh1, great thread.

We have had mixed results with cedar planks. The tip on preheating one side looks good -we'll try next time.

What planks did you use? We've had mixed results which I'm certain are the result of planks used. (Certainly can;t be my world class grilling skills ) Some were quite thin and burned easily, some smell like they are treated wood ...you get the picture.
The preheating tip I got from that Fire & Flavor site - Fire & Flavor .

I have used alder planks so far from that company. About 3/8 inch thick, looks like I can still reuse even though they aren't that thick. I like the alder smoke smell, and they smelled really good! I got some cedar too - I just haven't tried it yet.

I've been using fairly long soaking times - 4 to 6 hours - so I haven't been getting that much burning.

Yes - definitely do NOT use treated wood! And the only type of cedar you can use is Western Red Cedar - the other cedar types have resins that can pop/burn/explode. I guess you have to be real careful about getting untreated wood if you go to a hardware store to buy your planks.

That web site also has an amazing number of plank grilling recipes.

Audrey
__________________
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 05:29 PM   #36
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
The preheating tip I got from that Fire & Flavor site - Fire & Flavor .

I have used alder planks so far from that company. About 3/8 inch thick, looks like I can still reuse even though they aren't that thick. I like the alder smoke smell, and they smelled really good! I got some cedar too - I just haven't tried it yet.

I've been using fairly long soaking times - 4 to 6 hours - so I haven't been getting that much burning.

Yes - definitely do NOT use treated wood! And the only type of cedar you can use is Western Red Cedar - the other cedar types have resins that can pop/burn/explode. I guess you have to be real careful about getting untreated wood if you go to a hardware store to buy your planks.

That web site also has an amazing number of plank grilling recipes.

Audrey
Thanks for the info and link
__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 09:33 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Hey Audreyh1, great thread.

We have had mixed results with cedar planks. The tip on preheating one side looks good -we'll try next time.

What planks did you use? We've had mixed results which I'm certain are the result of planks used. (Certainly can;t be my world class grilling skills ) Some were quite thin and burned easily, some smell like they are treated wood ...you get the picture.
You need to make sure the packaging says the planks were not treated or for culinary usage. Make sure you do not use a really high grilling temperature. Nothing over 375. Also the planks need to soak for about an hr at least. They do get a nice smokey flavor. As you can see from my pictures there is a nice smoke on the outside of the salmon.
__________________
Notmuchlonger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2009, 08:46 AM   #38
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notmuchlonger View Post
You need to make sure the packaging says the planks were not treated or for culinary usage. Make sure you do not use a really high grilling temperature. Nothing over 375. Also the planks need to soak for about an hr at least. They do get a nice smokey flavor. As you can see from my pictures there is a nice smoke on the outside of the salmon.
Thanks. We have had good results and then not so good. I bought one set of cedar that never made it onto the grill - they smelled funny right out of the wrapper but there was no indication anywhere about being treated.

I'm taking away from this -

red cedar, more than 1/2" thick, has to say untreated
longer soaking
preheat one side, then use the other
keep the temp below 375
find a good retailer - like Audrey's link.
__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2009, 10:06 AM   #39
Recycles dryer sheets
LoftyNotions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Billings
Posts: 96
If you order planked salmon in the Pacific Northwest it will probably come on a Cedar plank. I much prefer almost any of the deciduous hardwoods, such as Alder (which Audrey mentioned), Cherry, Maple, Oak, or Hickory. I typically just go grab a scrap of wood out of my wood shop to cook on. I have 2 criteria: It needs to be a hardwood and the fish needs to fit on it.

I do soak my planks for at least a couple hours, but for the 4/4 (1 inch) stock I use it's probably unnecessary. Probably all this does is slightly reduce the mild smoke flavor. I would gauge presoaking based on the amount of charring I get on the plank bottom. I don't pre-char 1 side of my plank. If I reused the planks I definitely would do this step though. My planks warp. That's what happens to wood that is dampened and then differentially dried. I just looked at 3 previously warped planks I used within the last couple months. The warp is now almost gone.

Audrey, if you want to add a little more smoke flavor with your Weber, just roll up some smoker wood chips in aluminum foil, crimp the ends, and stick the doobie under your grill but on top of the flavorizer bars. I usually put mine almost directly over one of the burner tubes. Experiment with placement and prewetting to get the amount of smoke you want.

Depending on the thickness of the fish I'm cooking, it's usually on the grill for 30 to 40 minutes at 350 to 400.
__________________
LoftyNotions is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2009, 07:10 PM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoftyNotions View Post
Audrey, if you want to add a little more smoke flavor with your Weber, just roll up some smoker wood chips in aluminum foil, crimp the ends, and stick the doobie under your grill but on top of the flavorizer bars. I usually put mine almost directly over one of the burner tubes. Experiment with placement and prewetting to get the amount of smoke you want.
I don't think the Weber Q design has flavorizer bars. Now that I look at what they are on the web - pretty sure not. And my burner tube is very very close to the grill itself - there is really not a place to put anything under the grill. I think that's just one of the drawbacks of the grill I have.

Otherwise - thanks!

Audrey
__________________

__________________
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Generation Jones - WOO HOO!! queeneev Other topics 57 01-21-2009 03:46 PM
Grilling Chicken. chinaco Other topics 24 08-19-2008 10:49 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:51 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.