Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-21-2013, 04:23 PM   #21
Full time employment: Posting here.
urn2bfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 711
I would just add that if what you end up,doing is tied to Defense/homeland Security then there is no danger of outsourcing. I have heard that Boeing has jobs waiting for qualified US citizen engineers because so many of the applicants can't pass the security clearances.
__________________

__________________
urn2bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-21-2013, 05:54 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsmeow View Post
imoldernu - My son started community college at 16 since he graduated high school early. We've been glad that he did since he has changed what he plans to do with his life at least 5 times in the last 2 1/2 years. He is 18 now and still doesn't really know what he wants to do when he grows up. One thing we have encouraged him to do early in his college career is try to take a wide variety of college courses and see what lights his fire and what he is good at. After starting with psychology, moving to English, then to business, then to accounting, ....he is now back to English (and possibly law school at the end). It surely isn't what I would have advised him when he started college, but it is what he has most enjoyed and what he does well in. He turned away from it for reason 3, but is now moving back to it.
Sounds a lot like my grandson's situation. He's 14 and has also been in accelerated courses. His current SAT scores virtually assure acceptance at his choice of colleges. His heart is currently set on finishing HS at IMSA, here in Illinois. That usually leads to a science based course of education, but I can see he has wider interests in life. My liberal arts education, and the joy it has brought to my life, makes me want to stay out of the advice process, as his parents are more inclined to feel strongly about being assured of his financial security... understandable to be sure.

Somehow I feel that the most important need in the coming decades, will be for people who are couched in the humanities, to change the direction of a world veering towards self destruction, but that's just some old fashioned idealism peeking through.

Quote:
However, I don't think that the income that a field can bring to you should ever outweigh factors 1 and 2.
+1
__________________

__________________
Today is the oldest you've ever been, and the youngest you'll ever be again. - Eleanor Roosevelt
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 05:59 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
target2019's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3,705
Information Security.
Information Assurance.
Security Architect.
Security Engineer.
Information Management.
Supply Logistics Analyst.

Be prepared for continuous study after the degree to achieve certifications every few years.

If not desiring infotech, then Nursing or associated sciences like Bio Med.

I feel it is also important to have additional language such as French or Spanish.
__________________
target2019 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 06:00 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
obgyn65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: midwestern city
Posts: 4,061
I would advise the 17 year old to go into healthcare or learn Chinese. Both skills are even better, :-)
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post

If you were at the point of advising an educational pathway for a 17 year old, what direction(s) would you point to... for satisfaction and security?
__________________
Very conservative with investments. Not ER'd yet, 48 years old. Please do not take anything I write or imply as legal, financial or medical advice directed to you. Contact your own financial advisor, healthcare provider, or attorney for financial, medical and legal advice.
obgyn65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 06:27 PM   #25
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 728
Almost everyone is talking about college!

A huge minority of kids won't go to or graduate college. So, what should they do as they reach the critical age of 17 and face career decisions.

I know so many successful, happy construction workers, auto mechanics, plumbers, electricians etc. that are in high demand and make a good income. And, I also know many professionals that enjoy the same job security and inome. I guess what I'm trying to say is college isn't the only answer and we shouldn't push kids into college if it isn't right for them.

Within my own family we have a wide smattering of careers from truck driver to PHD college professor. I'm barely a high school graduate married to a Masters in fine arts and have 3 kids, all different....all differnt careers. And, my gradkids are each unique as well. I am personally lucky, however, since I've outearned most of them in my 3rd career which my Dad hated and told me I was nuts to even consider.

So what do I tell a 17 year old......my advice is similar to other on this post.Identify the 2 to 5 careers you would enjoy the most and pick the one that will pay you the most money and offer the most security. What I don't want to do is pressure those close to my as I was pressured and end up fighting with and being demeaned as I was. Did my Dad know how bad I felt......absolutely not.....he was trying to force me into a career that he would have loved buy when he was 17 his family didn't have the money to send him to school so he wanted me to have the opportunity he missed.

Finally, for a few years I was a part time musician. Every time I performed I would have still done it even if I wasn't paid. So, if you can find a job you love, make good money and focus on a quality personal live, you have won! It took me a while but I'm really lucky, I have my health, a great loving family and am retiring from a great career.
__________________
jerome len is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 06:58 PM   #26
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 63
As a recruiter, I would advise anything in business, IT, or engineering.

Anyone not going to college would do well with any skilled trade or as a machinist. Skilled machinists are one of the most difficult positions to fill nationally right now.

Good luck!
__________________
Papa bear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 07:31 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,038
Make money to support yourself first.
Save the world second.
__________________
In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.
Lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 08:29 PM   #28
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,348
My advice would be to do what you enjoy. And do it well. It will make the next 30-40 years of work worth living.
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 08:34 PM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Katsmeow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerome len View Post

A huge minority of kids won't go to or graduate college. So, what should they do as they reach the critical age of 17 and face career decisions.

I know so many successful, happy construction workers, auto mechanics, plumbers, electricians etc. that are in high demand and make a good income. And, I also know many professionals that enjoy the same job security and inome. I guess what I'm trying to say is college isn't the only answer and we shouldn't push kids into college if it isn't right for them.
I entirely agree about alternatives to a college degree. One point - while a bit more than a majority of people in the US attend some college, only a minority ever attain a bachelor's degree. The large majority of American's do not hold a bachelor's degree.

At the local community colleges you can train for a lot of careers that don't require a bachelor's degree. And, for many students - in fact, I would argue for most students - they are better served by such a course of training.
__________________
Katsmeow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 09:21 PM   #30
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 46
Nursing. Bang for the buck the best career choice in my opinion. 2 yr degree and there is always a demand.
__________________
UnderTheRadar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 11:02 PM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTheRadar View Post
Nursing. Bang for the buck the best career choice in my opinion. 2 yr degree and there is always a demand.
DS is taking an LNA training course right now. It is a lot more involved than I thought it would be and that is but the first baby step. He's using it to get a better sense if he likes that kind of work (and be able to support himself). If he likes it, then I hope he'll move on into nursing.

He's not much for academics tho, more a hands on kind of kid with a good heart.
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 06:48 AM   #32
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post

more a hands on kind of kid with a good heart.
Just the kind of people we need more of to make this a truly wonderful world .
__________________
boatfishandnature is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 10:55 AM   #33
Full time employment: Posting here.
citrine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 944
I could never understand finding a job/career and doing it for 30-40 years....what a boring way of life for me!!
I did the college thing, the corporate thing....and now I do what I love so it is not work for me at all.

Physical therapy/Rehab
Nursing
Neuromuscular Massage therapist/Trigger Point Therapist
Auto-mechanics (DH cannot find a decent mechanic because no one is going into this)
Nursing
Business (Geriatric care, Pet sitting...one of my clients in NY makes over 100K doing this!)
__________________
citrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 11:10 AM   #34
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Little Trailer Down By The River
Posts: 172
Engineering will be outsourced to the lowest international bidder (ask any big firm architect about outsourcing to India). If it is about staying employed, find things that have to be done locally, heavy equipment maintenance, skilled auto/diesel mechanic, skilled machinist (to the degree anything will ever be machined in the US again), primary medicine, nursing, PT.
__________________
"Here's to them who would read,
Here's to them that would write.
There's none ever feared that the Truth would be heard,
But those whom the Truth would indict."

Robert Burns
poorcarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 11:17 AM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
Tyro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Upstate
Posts: 699
An activity (in lieu of "j*b") you love is not w*rk. You will do your best and beyond, especially if/when it's something you believe in as well as love (sleeping at night and being able to look at yourself in the mirror are more important that salary, IMO). I've done this twice during my life -- most satisfying and worst paying occupations I've ever had, and wish I were still doing either if I could.

Doing something you hate (and/or w*rking for someone you hate) "will only make someone work just hard enough not to get fired."*

*Quote from Office Space. I'd sit down with any kid and watch it, and then discuss careers afterward.

Tyro
__________________
Yeah well, that's just, ya know, like, your opinion, man. ~ The Dude
Tyro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 04:55 PM   #36
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,528
Also consider something that requires a physical presence. It is difficult to imagine outsourcing firefighting, plumbing, or electrical work. We settled today on FIL's house, not luxury lving but not a starter home either, and the buyer is a young Master Electrician. They don't give those certs out in cereal boxes.

Construction is another, if one likes building things. Design (architect) is one thing. Making it go from paper/computer to real is quite another.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 07:36 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by obgyn65 View Post
I would advise the 17 year old to go into healthcare or learn Chinese. Both skills are even better, :-)
Truer words have not been posted!
__________________
ERhoosier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 09:41 PM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jollystomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,358
I am biased towards anything in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) fields, as those are the skills even basic jobs are going to require more of.

However, more important than going off to college to study is to get involved with people. Get involved in a student organization or seek an internship or volunteer in a field they think they might want to work in. Contact people who are in that field not to ask for a job, but to find out how they got there and what they attribute to that success.

Finally, cultivate skills that, in my view, will be applicable to any field and can make a difference:
- The ability to continually learn and apply new things.
- The ability to listen and actually hear what others are saying.
- The ability to speak and present a topic in front of others (bonus if you can present it in terms that .
- The ability to work with others on a project and meet deadlines.
- The ability to disagree without getting angry or insulting.
- The ability to thank and praise others when they have done something well.
__________________
jollystomper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 10:04 PM   #39
Recycles dryer sheets
ICNTR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 79
Tough question. It gets back to the age old delima of..."Shall I follow my passion, or shall I choose a lucrative, logical career?"

I chose Mechanical Engineering which was not my passion. I actually struggled at math prior to college. My logic was, if I could master my weakness then I would be much more well rounded and equipped for anything. (......strange, I know!)
Good news is that math got easier. Better news is, a good work ethic, remembering to focus on my customer, and my "logical career choice" allowed me to retire at 41.
So now I am trying to remember what my passions are so I can get back to those!

That was a very long way to say that in my experience, engineering was a great choice that always seemed to have a very high demand.
__________________
ICNTR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 06:49 AM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
Also consider something that requires a physical presence. It is difficult to imagine outsourcing firefighting, plumbing, or electrical work. We settled today on FIL's house, not luxury lving but not a starter home either, and the buyer is a young Master Electrician. They don't give those certs out in cereal boxes.

Construction is another, if one likes building things. Design (architect) is one thing. Making it go from paper/computer to real is quite another.
Good point.

I'd add HVAC, automobile repair and telecom specialists to the list.

These trades continue to get more and more technical, requiring good problem solving and computer skills.
__________________

__________________
JoeWras is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:32 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.