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Old 12-05-2011, 11:42 PM   #21
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Work as a social outlet and fitness plan. Really? How is sitting in front of a computer writing crappy articles any more like exercise than sitting you're couch watching TV? As for the social aspect, I'd rather spend time with a couple of good friends than be forced to spend my time with a bunch of people that I fantasize about running over in the parking lot.
I would too, but I doubt if much time went into the article and she would have at least had to discuss it with an editor .... oh wait.....this is Yahoo! we are talking about....

Actually, writing an article (regardless of its merits or lack thereof) has to be more stimulating than merely sitting passivly infront of the TV?
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Old 12-06-2011, 12:31 AM   #22
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I call BS on the "I'll be bored" explanation. Anyone who says they would be bored if they retire early must therefore be planning to never retire. If you will be bored at 52, what would be not boring at 65, or 67, or 70 or whatever is not "early" retirement.?
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:17 AM   #23
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All 5 reasons are just excuses for many who do not have the courage to move on when it is time to do so. Whilst the 5 reasons sound so lame, it comes as no surprise that we hear them so often from our friends too. Granted there are quite a few who truly love their jobs - for these, I'll tell them to stay on since they are enjoying what they do.
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Old 12-06-2011, 04:54 AM   #24
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I'd rather spend time with a couple of good friends than be forced to spend my time with a bunch of people that I fantasize about running over in the parking lot.
Can you come to my parking lot...Please!
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Old 12-06-2011, 06:53 AM   #25
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But I'm glad some people think this way because that is more money that I can rely on that will go towards FICA. It's getting scary out there because the gov. is thinking of cutting taxes more, which will contribute less into the SS fund.
Don't worry. As long as the majority population is sharing the 5 reasons being given, the remaining ER minority should be fine.
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Old 12-06-2011, 07:41 AM   #26
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I think you folks are being too hard on the author. There are in fact people that love what they do for a living, don't have any outside interests, and would prefer to work and all that goes along with it. I personally know several people that could *easily* retire based on large inheritances they received, but they like there co-workers, they like their jobs, and like the routine they have - one is a school teacher, one is a nurse who just loves helping sick people.

I think its awfully presumptuous to assume anyone of us knows better how someone else should live their lives.
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:06 AM   #27
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I think its awfully presumptuous to assume anyone of us knows better how someone else should live their lives.
That is what she does in her article. It's just here people disagree with her. She wrote another article titled Keys to Health and Happiness After Retirement here. They are

Create a Social network
Reduce Stress
Have a Sunny Disposition
Abstain from tobacco
Don't diet

Regarding stress, she writes "While it may be tempting to go back to work or volunteer, consider first whether doing so would bring happiness or stress."

Perhaps the disagreement is she is just writing about a subject while people here are living it. There is little depth or analysis to what she writes, so this may be a case of much ado about nothing.
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:06 AM   #28
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I think its awfully presumptuous to assume anyone of us knows better how someone else should live their lives.
If everyone who posted here stopped being presumptuous this site would be really dull...

(...and yes, I realize it is presumptuous of me to say that.)
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:43 AM   #29
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So do I (and I reached that point long before my current age of 45), but it would appear that the author values money more than her remaining time. It looks like a poor deal to me, but she's entitled to spend her time how she wishes.
Time to pull out my favorite ER image:
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File Type: gif WhyRetire.gif (60.0 KB, 263 views)
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Old 12-06-2011, 09:02 AM   #30
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It's not all that simple for everyone.

While I don't have to work, I choose to do so. I like the people there, the unplanned-for income is gravy, (I certainly wouldn't have blown $12k on a motorcycle without it and if DW wants to spend more on gifts to nieces that's fine) the hours suit me, I can get time off when I want it, and the commute is 3.4 miles. If both traffic lights are red (rare) it takes eight minutes to get there. There's only one on the return.

That said, I've also got my KMA hat and if things go sour I'm outa there. I'm not getting an ulcer or stressed out over some supervisory lunatic. Nor am I personally defined by the job or the income. Those last two are issues for some people. We have no problem saying to others "We can't afford that." Or perhaps more accurately "We're not going to allocate that much of our available financial resources to that."

The unplanned-for income gives us options we wouldn't have had otherwise later on. If one thinks about it, that is an optimistic position to take since it requires assuming that there will be a "later".

And if there is no "later", well, I lost the bet. Happens all the time.
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Old 12-06-2011, 09:11 AM   #31
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Once I wore a pedometer to work and logged in 300 steps for 11 hours of work. If the printer had been closer to my desk it would have been so much less. So for me, the activity level has increased tremendously since leaving.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:03 AM   #32
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I have never regretted retiring at 62! I like to be with people but prefer people that I know well and like. At work I often was with people I knew well and didn't like.

The first 18 months of retirement didn't go as planned. I lost a finger in January 2011 by catching my ring on something - on a cruise. The time since then has been mostly spent resting and recovering. It's immensely stressful and I can't imagine how I could have worked during this time. It is mostly healed.

But more to the point - a lot of people talked about time. I resent this past year that I lost. I can't reclaim it but it cut a year off things I intended to do in retirement (art work, in particular). In addition, the clutter in the house expanded radically because I couldn't use my hand much. I'm just now barely able to work at stuff for more than an hour or two.

All this will pass: the house will get organized, the art work will resume, I won't leave a mess to sort out like my parents' house will be when my dad dies (he's 91). I do find that time is much more important than money. I mostly live in jeans and sweatshirts and t-shirts. Costco is a fine source for jeans... and cheap.

The time lost really bugs me but there's nothing - NOTHING - I can do about it or the missing finger. I don't see money as an issue at all. I have enough if I live reasonably and don't buy expensive clothes (which I don't need). I just hope to have time to make art and do other creative things, travel, etc., while I still have energy. 20 years will go by very quickly and suddenly I'll be 83. It's so different than when I was 30! Time was endless - now time is precious.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:18 AM   #33
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We need more people writing articles like this and thinking like this. Only the smart ones should be in ER. Will enable us slackers to continue enjoying our SS, medicare, etc.

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Old 12-06-2011, 11:02 AM   #34
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Good responses here, everyone, I liked reading them.

As for me, my 5 reasons for retiring early:

(1) I hated the increasingly sickening commute more every day.

(2) I had the money. (And even if SS is reduced or eliminated, I will still be just fine.)

(3) Working, even part-time (2 days a week in the last 17 months and generally part-time the last 7 years) had interfered with my growing outside life in those 7 years, as it had become a juggling act.

(4) I hated the increasingly sickening commute more every day.

(5) I hated the increasingly sickening commute more every day.

I never saw work as a social outlet. I was mostly a loner, especially from the mid-1990s and later. In my 23 years there I never had any interest in attending the annual December holiday party (and was proud of my non-attendance).
The problem with commuting in New York is all the New Yorkers.
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Old 12-06-2011, 03:23 PM   #35
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Once I wore a pedometer to work and logged in 300 steps for 11 hours of work. If the printer had been closer to my desk it would have been so much less. So for me, the activity level has increased tremendously since leaving.
Whoa, that was a truly sedentary job.

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Old 12-06-2011, 03:25 PM   #36
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Let's see...I did 36 minutes on an elliptical machine earlier today and then an upper body weight workout. After lunch I walked the dog for half an hour. Yeah...I guess I'd be in better physical shape if I spent that time in traffic on the Beltway, walking to the copier to make copies, etc.
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Old 12-06-2011, 03:46 PM   #37
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It is not about presumption- it is about logical consistency. My objection to the "I'll/You'll be bored" excuse is that it is irrelevant to the question of early vs late retirement. If you will be bored - you should NEVER retire -ever -if you can avoid it. That is another discussion...but not relevant to EARLY retirement decision making.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:44 PM   #38
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Two things I plan to do when I retire are: 1). Exercise more. 2). Eat healthier food. 3). Reduce work related stress in my life. Oh, thats three things. I can't help but think my health will improve.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:55 PM   #39
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20 years will go by very quickly and suddenly I'll be 83. It's so different than when I was 30! Time was endless - now time is precious.
I saw a t-shirt in Waikiki the other day on an elder: "Inside every 85-year-old is a 25-year-old wondering what the hell happened."
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Old 12-07-2011, 01:11 AM   #40
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My reason for not retiring early is I am too old.

I have what you would say is enough money but I hope to live a very long time and don't want to be 95 and out of money. Mom is 85 and said this summer she wished she was rich but she has enough. When you are that age you can't go back to work and she has been retired 26 years so far. She said she can only afford 12 years assisted living if she has to go. Her doctor said she has nothing to prevent living to 120. I will work until something happens so I don't have to worry in my 80s and 90s.

I don't mind my job most of the time except having to get up then finding a place to park. The job is kinda fun, problem solving and helping coworker and my boss thinks I am wonderful. I got two pay raises this year totaling 10% and will get a bonus and profit sharing of about 30% of my salary so I will make about 80K a year with the bonuses. To me that isn't bad since I don't have a good reason to quit. When I retire I need to really clean the house top to bottom floor to ceiling and paint everything and get new carpet. Seems like a lot more work that just going to the office.
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