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Old 06-20-2010, 01:33 PM   #41
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Good heavens! What are you supposed to do about this?

Ha
I'd start by arranging my schedule so that I was never alone in the building with her, that's for sure.
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Old 06-20-2010, 03:35 PM   #42
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This is scary. Few psychiatric patients actually harm anyone, but if they are delusional, reality goes out the window. First, it's a good thing that the psychiatrist has warned her. Prior to the Tarasoff case (1976) this would have been considered a breach of medical ethics. Luckily nowadays the psychiatrist is free to warn a potential victim and indeed has a duty to do so.

Tarasoff v. Regents of the University of California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It seems to me that the potential victim has a right to protection until it can be shown that the patient is no longer thinking harmful thoughts. Can any of our legal or law enforcement experts comment?
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Old 06-20-2010, 04:44 PM   #43
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Good heavens! What are you supposed to do about this?

Ha
DW will be out of the office for the next couple of weeks, so it will give time for management to do something about it (they are responsible for DW's safety while at work after all). IMO, they will likely move DW's colleague to a different company branch where she won't have any interaction with DW. I think that our best bet is to stay out of it. We certainly do not want the colleague to start blaming DW for her possible relocation.
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Old 06-20-2010, 04:47 PM   #44
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In my neck of the woods, it would lead to carrying a concealed handgun.
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Old 06-21-2010, 08:55 PM   #45
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ER is a rotten dream worth discarding. All your troubles won't disappear just because you stop going to work. On the contrary, you're just trading one set of troubles for another set. My advice - ditch ER. Focus on making your present life a joy to live. Happiness is the ultimate goal -- not cessation of work.

On a side note, your DW needs to ditch that 80 hr work week. It's going to harm her health immeasurably, which may, if she keeps it up, God forbid, even lead to a trip to the ER.
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Old 06-21-2010, 09:00 PM   #46
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I'm seeing a pattern here. The oily one is either displaying a textbook case of sour grapes since he/she apparently lacks the ability to FIRE. Or he/she's a troll...
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Old 06-21-2010, 09:07 PM   #47
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All your troubles won't disappear just because you stop going to work...
True. Only some of the troubles will disappear.

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On the contrary, you're just trading one set of troubles for another set...
True too. Like an ER will have to contemplate: "What will I do all day".

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ER is a rotten dream worth discarding.
Two "true" answers to the statements above still do not lead to that conclusion.
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Old 07-01-2010, 01:18 PM   #48
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My plan is to start living on a stricter budget starting next year. For that, I think, we need to stop seeing so much money coming into our checking account each month. So:

We happen to have a year worth of living expenses in a savings account right now. I would like to start sending 100% of our paychecks directly to our investment accounts and try to live for an entire year solely on what's currently in that savings account. I will force us to plan expenses better and it should help us transition from living on a large, ever expanding income to living on a smaller, fixed income.
Given the state of the economy, I decided there was no point in waiting until next year to start implementing the plan and cutting expenses. So, starting today, we are officially living on a fixed income. I have kept only 6 months worth of living expenses in our savings account and that's all the money we can spend until the end of the year. Our entire paychecks will go directly to our Vanguard account from now on. At the end of the year, our budget for 2011 will be adjusted based on the market performance in 2010, just like in retirement... If the market keeps tanking, then I guess we'll have to cut expenses some more next year! It could really test our fortitude and our desire to FIRE ASAP! It's strange, I kinda feel excited about the whole thing, even though it's probably going to be tougher than expected.
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Old 07-01-2010, 01:23 PM   #49
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Given the state of the economy, I decided there was no point in waiting until next year to start implementing the plan and cutting expenses.
As I read this I was halfway expecting to hear you say you were moving back in with your parents.

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I kinda feel excited about the whole thing, even though it's probably going to be tougher than expected.
If you didn't make draconian cuts in your budget you might be surprised how easy - and satisfying - the transition will be.
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Old 07-01-2010, 01:49 PM   #50
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Update:



Given the state of the economy, I decided there was no point in waiting until next year to start implementing the plan and cutting expenses. So, starting today, we are officially living on a fixed income. I have kept only 6 months worth of living expenses in our savings account and that's all the money we can spend until the end of the year. Our entire paychecks will go directly to our Vanguard account from now on. At the end of the year, our budget for 2011 will be adjusted based on the market performance in 2010, just like in retirement... If the market keeps tanking, then I guess we'll have to cut expenses some more next year! It could really test our fortitude and our desire to FIRE ASAP! It's strange, I kinda feel excited about the whole thing, even though it's probably going to be tougher than expected.
You might also want to keep a few thousand from your emergency fund, in your savings account even if you don't plan to spend it. You don't want to suck the bank accounts completely dry, down to $0.00 balance, on December 31st, right?
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:08 PM   #51
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As I read this I was halfway expecting to hear you say you were moving back in with your parents.


If you didn't make draconian cuts in your budget you might be surprised how easy - and satisfying - the transition will be.
My parents wouldn't take me back. They always made it clear that they have a "no return" policy...

We had to make some cuts. Looking at our budget overall, we will have to spend about $2K less per year than what we spent on average over the past 6 years. It doesn't seem too bad except that I am also planning to pay a lot more for health care than we did over the past 6 years ($10K instead of $2K/year on average). So that's $8K/year that needs to be cut from other areas of our budget. Out of the past 6 years, our leanest year spending-wise was in 2008. Our retirement budget is set about $3,000 below that. Since I do not remember suffering from deprivation in 2008, I think it is possible (in 2008, our income increased dramatically and so, while we reined in our spending due to the state of the economy, we didn't really feel the need to be overly cautious about our spending).
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:11 PM   #52
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Sounds like a sensible plan . It's better to be sure before you pull the plug .
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:22 PM   #53
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ESR is quite liberating and for us has been even better than we dreamed. If you decide to do it I wish you the best!
Just on a point of order: what is ESR? ER, I've worked out but I can't find the version with S in the FAQ.
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:25 PM   #54
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:30 PM   #55
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You might also want to keep a few thousand from your emergency fund, in your savings account even if you don't plan to spend it. You don't want to suck the bank accounts completely dry, down to $0.00 balance, on December 31st, right?
We still have plenty of cash at Vanguard for emergencies. But our budget includes emergency savings too, so I truly hope we don't have to get money from our Vanguard stash.

The account balance won't go down to $0. Our budget includes money set aside for car repairs, home repairs, car replacement and health care costs, all of which we are unlikely to spend down completely before the end of the year.

Our proposed annual budget includes:
1) $20K for fixed costs: auto (insurance, gas, tax), groceries, home (pest control, insurance, tax), pets (food, vet), and utilities.
2) $10K for health care
3) $9K for car replacement, home repairs and car repairs
4) $5K for his allowance
5) $5K for her allowance
6) $11K for large discretionary (travel, furniture, computers, gifts, etc...)
Total $60K

So I left $30K in our savings account to pay the bills until 12/31/10. Since we pay almost nothing for health care at the moment, 2) will remain mostly unspent and will simply be rolled over to next year, giving us a bit a cushion for later years. Since we have 2 new cars and we have updated the house over the past few years (new roof, new A/C, new appliances, etc..), 3) will also remain mostly unspent and will be rolled over to next year. So we should end the year with roughly $9.5K left in the account.
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Old 07-01-2010, 03:44 PM   #56
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That sounds reasonable. Just didn't want you to start bouncing checks on December 31st if you were a few pennies over budget.
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Old 07-02-2010, 10:30 AM   #57
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That sounds reasonable. Just didn't want you to start bouncing checks on December 31st if you were a few pennies over budget.
I hope I won't be bouncing checks! Bank fees are not included in my budget...

On a sad note, my employer just informed me that my contract won't be renewed at the end of the month. The company had been facing a cash flow crunch for months and, with the economy slowing down again, they can't afford to keep many of us.
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Old 07-02-2010, 10:45 AM   #58
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I hope I won't be bouncing checks! Bank fees are not included in my budget...

On a sad note, my employer just informed me that my contract won't be renewed at the end of the month. The company had been facing a cash flow crunch for months and, with the economy slowing down again, they can't afford to keep many of us.
Oh no! As John Lennon remarked, "Life is what happens when you are busy making other plans". But the timing of this non-renewal sure is inconvenient.

So, will ER will begin for you at the end of the month, or are you planning to look for another contract job?
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:13 AM   #59
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So, will ER will begin for you at the end of the month, or are you planning to look for another contract job?
I don't know. Looking for another contract is going to be tough without relocating (and then there is the awful job market). And relocating is not an option as long as DW can keep her job.

I will have to do the math on this. DW is the one making good money, plus I already get my health insurance through her company because, as a contract worker, I had no benefits. DW's income alone puts us in the top tax bracket, so my income is always heavily taxed (next year it would have been taxed at 39.6% federal + 5% state + 7.65% FICA = 52.25%). So perhaps, my time would be better served generating imputed income for the household. I am going to have to mull over all this and its implications for our FIRE plan.
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:16 AM   #60
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DW's income alone puts us in the top tax bracket...
I'm beginning to think you might figure out some way to muddle through...
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