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Old 04-04-2008, 02:31 PM   #121
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Come to Calgary...all we get up here is snow (and not even that much...thanks global warming )
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:35 PM   #122
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Phoenix: wildfire risk
I'm not sure how serious to take your post. I'm looking at a satellite view of Phoenix, and I'm having trouble finding many trees at all. How is "wildfire" a risk for a city in the middle of the desert?

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LV: fires, tornados, rampant VD.
Again, it's surrounded by dust and sand. How is it at risk of "fires?" As for tornadoes, apparently Vegas has been "hit" by just 11 tornadoes since 1950. I put "hit" in quotation marks because "No deaths or injuries were reported." The strongest was an F1 (the second-weakest possible).

Texas, on the other hand, has 110 tornadoes per year. That's literally 50,000% more.

That makes Las Vegas extremely low risk for tornadoes. If you live in Las Vegas, you can rest assured you're probably never going to be at risk of getting hit by a tornado. If you live in Los Angeles, on the other hand, you're pretty much guaranteed that someday you'll be affected by an earthquake.

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Detroit: Riots, fires, snow.
"Snow"? OK, now you're just reaching. This is getting ridiculous.

All I am saying is that certain locations are at much, much higher risk of certain catastrophes than other areas. Some areas are well-known to be at high risk for particular disasters. People who live there, don't prepare, and then suffer from said disaster, and then act surprised, are idiots.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:42 PM   #123
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What makes a city have an increased risk of fire, extensive wood use? What makes for an increased risk of "riot," and how does that have anything to with natural disaster risk? I think you're exaggerating the risks of natural disasters in an attempt (for unknown reasons) to show that all cities are dangerous. It indisputable that some cities and regions of the country are very low risk with respect to natural disaster damage. See insurance pricing.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:42 PM   #124
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If you cannot imagine how a city in the middle of a desert can be at risk of serious fires, I don't know how to help you.

As for the rest, lets just say that investing in catastrophe reinsurers is a great way to learn about how many insurable disasters with large property damage totals there are out there.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:48 PM   #125
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If you cannot imagine how a city in the middle of a desert can be at risk of serious fires, I don't know how to help you.

As for the rest, lets just say that investing in catastrophe reinsurers is a great way to learn about how many insurable disasters with large property damage totals there are out there.
Are there low risk areas? What cities are low risk, since it seems like you've looked into this?
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:50 PM   #126
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Phoenix: wildfire risk
Negative.

Serious wildfires require a lot more fuel than the relatively spread out saguaro, ironwood, palo verde, and creosotes can provide to be any serious threat to Phoenix.

We have the occasional brush fire in town like anywhere else, but the big fires you read about in Arizona are generally North of Phoenix where the rapid elevation change has allowed lovely pine forests, or farther SE in the mountains near Tuscon.

I've lived here 12 years and have yet to see the city threatened by some wildfire hopping across prickly pears to consume Phoenix.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:56 PM   #127
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I'm not sure how serious to take your post. I'm looking at a satellite view of Phoenix, and I'm having trouble finding many trees at all. How is "wildfire" a risk for a city in the middle of the desert?



Again, it's surrounded by dust and sand. How is it at risk of "fires?" As for tornadoes, apparently Vegas has been "hit" by just 11 tornadoes since 1950. I put "hit" in quotation marks because "No deaths or injuries were reported." The strongest was an F1 (the second-weakest possible).

Texas, on the other hand, has 110 tornadoes per year. That's literally 50,000% more.

That makes Las Vegas extremely low risk for tornadoes. If you live in Las Vegas, you can rest assured you're probably never going to be at risk of getting hit by a tornado. If you live in Los Angeles, on the other hand, you're pretty much guaranteed that someday you'll be affected by an earthquake.



"Snow"? OK, now you're just reaching. This is getting ridiculous.

All I am saying is that certain locations are at much, much higher risk of certain catastrophes than other areas. Some areas are well-known to be at high risk for particular disasters. People who live there, don't prepare, and then suffer from said disaster, and then act surprised, are idiots.
I would think that Phoenix one day may suffer from the greatest natural disaster of all. Water shortage. I realize there is an aquaduct, but if there is a water shortage, I'd bet you can be sure supplies would be cut back.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:07 PM   #128
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They have a lot of sources: underground watershed, local surface water from runoff, and remote lresevoirs like Mead that supply rivers.

Mead is still low and I believe the groundwater is also weak although improved lately, although ironically after the wet winter the surface water is overflowing from the runoff.

It's weird in that there are few if any water restrictions in town. Golf courses still lush green, public fountains, no pool covers, people put in lawns and water the hell out of them, no time usage restrictions, etc. This makes me believe that despite the heavy positive interstate migration rates there is a lot of wriggle room with water usage around here.

Regardless isn't as much a natural disaster as it was hundreds of years ago where limited supply lines meant no water = no crops = starve. Water might get more expensive and we might not be able to have lawns in front etc. but it's not really comparable to a sudden catastrophic event where your life is all jacked overnight.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:13 PM   #129
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related on the current drought conditions: SRP reservoirs at 93 percent capacity and rising | State News | eastvalleytribune.com

SRP reservoirs at 93 percent capacity and rising

Stored behind Salt River Project's six dams is the water that quenches our thirst, irrigates our crops and lights up our homes. This also is the water squandered by leaky faucets and air conditioners running full blast when no one is home.

In times of drought, such as the one parching the state since the mid-1990s, SRP relies on these reservoirs, located to the Valley's northeast, to meet demand.


And during wet winters, such as this one, the utility rejoices as rain and melted snow fill those lakes: Roosevelt, Apache, Canyon and Saguaro on the Salt River; Horseshoe and Bartlett on the Verde River.


Whether this winter will be an end to the drought or an aberration won't be known for at least another year.


SRP recently gave the Tribune a helicopter tour of the reservoir system, and from the air evidence of the recent rains is everywhere.


Months ago, on the morning of Nov. 30, the system was less than half-full - at 49 percent capacity. But after a series of well-timed storms, SRP now boasts of 93 percent capacity and rising.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:26 PM   #130
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Having no children I don't get the private schools thing. I have coworkers who pay outrageous amounts to send their children to private schools. Are they really that much better? I went to public only so I don't really know.
Often the word "private" is used for a religion-based institution, such as a Catholic (or Jewish, Hindu, etc. school) which the student is taught in a manner that also "teaches" in the religion or method of the selected practice of the parent(s).

I went to both Catholic and public schools. Each have their own advantages and disadvantages. Starting in Catholic grade-school (guess what religion my parents were ) I transferred to the local public school in 7th grade.

My son, who is disabled, always went to public school. They had much more "resources" to meet his "challange". Not saying one "type" of school is better, just to show that sometimes a "private" school cannot meet the needs of a public education. Private does not necessarily mean "better".

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Old 04-04-2008, 03:38 PM   #131
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LV: fires, tornados, rampant VD.

Detroit: Riots, fires, snow.

Boston: Major hurricane risk.

Chicago: Fires, flooding (its on the lake), boredom.
Lots of reaching going on here.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:41 PM   #132
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Lots of reaching going on here.
Hey, at least I didn't put the thing about space alien abductions down. That is specifically excluded from New Mexico homeowner's policies, although sometimes you can buy an anal probing expense reimbursement rider.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:46 PM   #133
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Lots of reaching going on here.
Lots of BS'ing going on, I'd say!
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:46 PM   #134
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Hey, at least I didn't put the thing about space alien abductions down.
I believe some of those aliens post here, daily!

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Old 04-04-2008, 04:19 PM   #135
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In particular, I think I'm already in love with miss Denise Janus: 25, mechanical engineer, smart about finances, hard working, nice smile, no husband and no kids. Wow, we may even have gone to the same school so that I can claim some alumni connection.
Kewl. An engineering hottie.
You guys could maybe tear down and rebuild an old big-block engine together and then cuddle up on the couch and solve some partial- derivative diff EQs. If ya really want to get her HOT (and I shouldn't tell you this), read to her out loud from Newton's "Principia Matematica" in the original Latin of course.

To really get her kinky, take turns writing out the Maxwell equations in the tub.
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Old 04-04-2008, 04:53 PM   #136
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That makes Las Vegas extremely low risk for tornadoes. If you live in Las Vegas, you can rest assured you're probably never going to be at risk of getting hit by a tornado. If you live in Los Angeles, on the other hand, you're pretty much guaranteed that someday you'll be affected by an earthquake.
Actually, the biggest risk in Las Vegas, believe it or not, is flashflooding. They don't get much rain (about 11 inches per year), but sometimes they get a lot of that all at once. A lot of the old arroyos (gulleys) have been built over and the flowing water goes into populated areas. They've been working on a multi-million-dollar containment system for about 25 years and it's still not finished.

I lived there for 40 years and never saw a tornado. We did have many "dust devils," which is a funnel of dust caused by ascending hot air (no puns, please) and look like a mini-tornado, but the most they do is throw your lawn chairs around.

The second biggest risk is gambling away your 401K and then some.
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Old 04-04-2008, 05:05 PM   #137
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Actually, the biggest risk in Las Vegas, believe it or not, is flashflooding. They don't get much rain (about 11 inches per year), but sometimes they get a lot of that all at once. A lot of the old arroyos (gulleys) have been built over and the flowing water goes into populated areas. They've been working on a multi-million-dollar containment system for about 25 years and it's still not finished.

I lived there for 40 years and never saw a tornado. We did have many "dust devils," which is a funnel of dust caused by ascending hot air (no puns, please) and look like a mini-tornado, but the most they do is throw your lawn chairs around.

The second biggest risk is gambling away your 401K and then some.
Yeah, I was there once when there was a downpour causing some minor flooding. Boy was I surprised.
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Old 04-04-2008, 05:14 PM   #138
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Chicago: Fires, flooding (its on the lake), boredom.
How much boredom insurance should I carry? Is it cheaper to get only liability coverage?
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Old 04-04-2008, 08:19 PM   #139
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How much boredom insurance should I carry? Is it cheaper to get only liability coverage?
No such thing as too much boredom insurance for some of us. I'd carry at least $10MM limit if I could find an insurer willing to write that much.
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Old 04-04-2008, 08:22 PM   #140
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Frank is my boredom insurance. Yearly premium costs nothing.
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